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Violation of Environmental Norms by Fertilizer Plants, Thermal Power Plants, Sugar Industry, Distillery, Cement Plants,in india, environmental laws in india,


Lanco Power fails to fulfill Green Norms 

The Lanco Power has a 1920-Mw power station in Pathadi village . Besides two units of 300-Mw each, the station has two units of 660-Mw.


  The company was supposed to develop a green belt  in 210 acres in the premises besides utilization the fly ash under the plan it had submitted. But the company allegedly failed to do so.
   Chhattisgarh Environment Conservation Board (CECB) has threatened to close the power production of the plant if it fails to execute the green norms. The notice was issued by the Regional Officer of the board.. more




Violation of Environmental Laws by Cement Plants
Six cement plants have been issued directions for violating environmental laws.Out of these, one cement plant has been issued directions under Section 5 of the Environment (Protection) Act 1986, the five other cement plants have been served with directions under Section 18(1)(b) of Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974 and Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981. These are (i) ACC Limited, Jamul Cement Works, Durg, Chattisgarh, (ii) Cement Corporation of India Ltd, Bokajan, Assam, (iii) Bagalkot Cement & Industries Ltd, Bagalkot, Karnataka, (iv) Travencore Cements Ltd, Kottayam, Kerala, (v) Orient Cement, Devapur, Adilabad, Andhra Pradesh (vi) ACC Ltd, Keymore Cement Works, Keymore, Madhya Pradesh.

There are two cement plants owned by M/s. Jay Pee at Rewa in Madhya Pradesh under the names of M/s. Jay Pee Bela cement and M/s. Jay Pee Rewa cement plant. M/s. Jay Pee Bela cement plant was found to be marginally exceeding the emission standards for which Madhya Pradesh State Pollution Control Board was asked to take corrective action. 

The Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) informed there are 128 cement plants in the country out of which, six have been reported to be non-compliant with the prescribed standards. 16 may 12














Dolphin Habitat gets Protected by  Environmental norms    Your grand children will continue to see the dolphin frolicking in the north eastern rivers thanks to the efforts of our environmental minister JAYANTHI NATRAJAN. 
Jayanthi Natarajan, minister for environment allayed all apprehension over violation of environment norms in construction of dams in the North-east.

Specific rules are drawn for the protection of wildlife.

Natarajan, referring to dam projects in the Brahmaputra, said there are specific steps for wildlife management that are laid down in the rules of environment and wildlifeclearances

The dolphin has been declared a ‘National Aquatic Animal'and steps are taken to safeguard its natural habitat not just in the dam area of Subansiri but all along the Brahmaputra

more


Ginger Hotel of the Taj Group sealed for violating Green norms

 The rod than the carrot has more effect in teaching a lesson.

In gurgaon the Ginger hotel had not complied with green norms;the effluent treatment was inadequate.

The kitchen has been sealed by the pollution control department.

more

Karnataka pays lip service to protection of Environment

  A gruop of industrialists had been  allotted land in the catchment area of the Arkavathi river. The Karnataka State Pollution Control Board (KSPCB) and the Union ministry of environment and forests (MoEF) raised objections as the industries in question were ‘red’ (highly polluting) units.

   The industrialists were willing to take alternate sites if offered by the govt.However no such action has been taken by the state.

The investors have crores[Speaking to Bangalore Mirror, a hardware entrepreneur who has paid Rs 1.71 crore for three acres of land ] locked in disputed land and are not able to move forward.

 Caught in a pincer between the rules and the mounting anger of the investors, KIADB probably thought evasiveness was the best policy.

 more

Violation of Environmental Norms
Firm fined Rs.100 crore for violating environmental lawsHimachal Pradesh,Immigration/Law/Rights, Fri, 04 May 2012IANS

Shimla, May 4 (IANS) In a landmark judgment, the green bench of the Himachal Pradesh High Court Friday imposed Rs.100 crore in damages on Jaiprakash Associates Ltd. (JAL), a subsidiary of the JP Group, for having set up a cement plant and the dismantling of a thermal plant, both in the state's Solan district, by violating environment laws and making false pleas before the authorities and the court.

 

The bench cancelled permissions for the 62 MW captive thermal plant and directed that it be dismantled within three months.

 

The court also set up a Special Investigation Team (SIT) to fix official responsibility for allowing the illegality.

 

The court's order came on a Public Interest Litigation (PIL) filed by Nalagarh-based environment NGO Himparivesh Environment Protection Society, which had been fighting the battle against the company on different fronts.

 

The division bench, comprising Justice Deepak Gupta and Justice Sanjay Karol observed that the entire foundation of the environmental clearance obtained by JP Associates is based on falsehood as the company lied about the cost of the cement plant.

 

The court said that JAL managed to get permission for the thermal plant without Environment Impact Assessment (EIA) clearance. "Even after it was brought to the notice of the company that EIA clearance was required, it continued to build the thermal Plant," it said.


*I n a landmark judgement, the Himachal Pradesh High Court has asked Jai Prakash Associates Limited (JAL) to pay Rs 100 crore as damages for flouting environmental laws to build its cement plant in Solan district of Himachal Pradesh. The court also cancelled the environmental clearance granted to the company’s 25 MW thermal power plant. The projects are at Bagheri village in Nalagarh tehsil. The court has ordered the company to dismantle its thermal plant within three months from the date of judgement.

The verdict, delivered by justice Deepak Gupta and Sanjay Karol on May 4, 2012, said JAL is “guilty of making false statements for obtaining environmental clearances for all its projects.” These include its cement grinding and blending plant of 1.75 million tonne per annum capacity and the coal-fired power plant.http://www.downtoearth.org.in/content/high-court-slaps-rs-100-crore-fine-jaypee-flouting-green-laws


JP cement indicted . Fails triple bottom line test


Q: What are the important Environmental Laws in India? 
 Ans:  Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974; 
 Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981,  Cess Act, 1977, 
 Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 and 
 Rules there under  Public Liability  Insurance Act,  1981, 
 National Environmental Tribunal Act, 1995 
 National Environment Appellate Authority Act, 1997 
Q. What are the different programes/activities implemented through State Pollution Control Board? 
Ans: State Boards are implementing following programmes Pollution control in 17 categories of highly polluting industries Pollution control from industries discharging waste water into rivers and lakes Inventorization of pollution industries in the State and ensuring their compliance to the Pollution control norms Restoration of environmental quality in critically polluted areas Monitoring of water and ambient air quality in the States Hazardous waste Bio-medical and Management of Municipal Solid Wastes 


Q. What are the laws enforced by of the Pollution Control Boards in India ?
Ans : The Central and State Pollution Control Boards were set up for enforcement of the Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act, 1974. Over the years, the Boards have been assigned additional responsibilities which include the following : 
Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Cess Act, 1977. 
Air (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act, 1981 
Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 and Rules made thereunder 
Hazardous Waste (Management & Handling) Rules1989.
Manufacture, storage and Import of Hazardous Chemicals Rules, 1989 
Bio-medical Waste (Management & Handling) Rules, 1998 
Municipal Solid Waste (Management & Handling) Rules, 2000. 
Plastics wastes Rules, 1999 o Coastal Regulation Zone Rules, 1991 
Public Liability Insurance Act, 1991 
Q. What are the specific functions of the Pollution Control Boards in India?
Ans : Functions of Central Pollution Control Board : 
Advise the Central Government on matters relating to pollution; Coordinate the activities of the State Boards; Provide Technical assistance to the State Boards, carry out and sponsor investigations and research relating to control of pollution; Plan and organize training of personnel; Collect, compile and publish technical and statistical data, prepare manuals and code of conduct. To lay down standards; To plan nation wide programme for pollution control. 
Functions of the State Pollution Control Boards: 
To advise the State Government on matter relating to pollution and on siting of industries 
To plan programme for pollution control; 
To collect and disseminate information; 
To carry our inspection; To lay down effluent and emission standards; 
To issue consent to industries and other activities for compliance of prescribed emission and effluent standards

more 

 

 

 

 

                     For prioritizing the actions for securing pollution control compliance in highly polluting categories of industries, the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) has identified 17 categories of such units which include Fertilizer Plants, Thermal Power Plants, Sugar Industry, Distillery, Cement Plants, etc. The Central Government has notified environmental standards for these highly polluting industries under the Environment (Protection) Rules, 1986.  These norms are available on the website of the Ministry of Environment and Forests as well as that of CPCB.

 

                       The aforesaid environmental standards are enforced by concerned State Pollution Control Boards (SPCBs) and Pollution Control Committees (PCCs). CPCB also undertakes surprise inspections of 17 categories of industries under Environment Surveillance Programme.  There are a total number of 2609 such highly polluting industries out of which, 347 industries are reported as non-compliant.  A list indicating the status of 17 categories of highly polluting industries is annexed.

 

The CPCB issues directions under sub-section 18(1)(b) of the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974 and the Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981 to concerned SPCBs.  The CPCB has issued 101 such directions to various SPCBs and PCCs during last three years.  In addition, CPCB has also issued directions to industrial units under Section 5 of the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986.

 

            The Central Government reviews the functioning of the CPCB from time to time. The Government has also undertaken the task of establishment of continuous stack emission monitoring in select industries.

STATUS OF  17 CATEGORIES OF  HIGHLY POLLUTING INDUSTRIES

 

S.No.

Name of the State/ Union Territory

Complying

Not complying**

Closed

Total

1

ASSAM

20

4

0

24

2

ANDHRA PRADESH

352

67

31

450

3

BIHAR

17

0

0

17

4

CHATTISGARH

70

5

0

75

5

GOA

16

1

       0

17

6

GUJARAT

142

53

60

255

7

HARYANA

68

10

4

82

8

HIMACHAL PRADESH

14

0

3

17

9

JAMMU & KASHMIR

7

0

3

10

10

JHARKHAND

22

0

5

27

11

KARNATAKA

119

9

12

140

12

KERALA

24

8

17

49

13

MADHYA PRADESH

42

18

5

65

14

MAHARASHTRA

237

8

69

314

15

MEGHALAYA

9

2

0

11

16

MIZORAM

1

0

0

1

17

ORRISA

38

7

8

53

18

PUNJAB

57

13

20

90

19

RAJASTHAN

82

30

26

138

20

TAMIL NADU

215

9

9

233

21

TRIPURA

8

1

0

9

22

UTTRANCHAL

21

17

2

40

23

UTTAR PRADESH

281

71

38

390

24

WEST BENGAL

54

10

21

85

25

CHANDIGARH

0

0

0

0

26

DAMAN

2

0

0

2

27

DELHI

2

0

3

5

28

PONDICHERY

4

2

3

9

29

SIKKIM

0

0

0

0

30

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

0

0

0

0

31

MANIPUR

0

0

0

0

32

ANDAMAN & NICOBAR

0

0

0

0

33

NAGALAND

0

0

0

0

34

LAKSHADWEEP

0

0

0

0

 

Total

1924

345

339

2608

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* State Pollution Control Boards are not submitting updated status regularly. Therefore, the above status is compiled on the basis of data available in division upto December 2010.

** Not complying: Industries with Effluent Treatment Plants/ Emission Control Systems installed but found not complying with few parameters of prescribed standards at the time of last monitoring.

This information was given by the Minister of State for the Ministry of Finance Shri Namo Narain Meena who is Incharge of Environment and Forests in a written reply to a question by Shri Ramkishun and Shri Hansraj G. Ahir in Lok Sabha today.

 

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