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                  TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

LATEST NEWS AND VIEWS

BOSCH E-BIKE

AUDI E-BIKE

VW E-BIKE

MERCEDES BENZ ELECTRIC BIKE

BMW E-BIKE

FORD SOLAR E-BIKE

PORSCHE E-BIKE

MARRS ELECTRIC BIKE

KAYLAD 2.0

HONDO STEP

LEXUS E-BIKE

 


LATEST NEWS AND VIEWS 

 

*

Visiobike e-bike makes your phone into a rear-view mirror

 

 

 

 

visiobike-2014.jpg Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Claiming your bike is the "smartest in the world" is a bold statement to make, but Visiobike founder Marko Matenda isn't all talk. His Visiobike, currently looking for funding on IndieGogo, is packed full of technology, from its design to its deep smartphone integration. I caught up with Marko to take Visiobike for a spin.

"I was studying economics and I saw that the e-bike market is growing a lot," Marko told me. "I recognised an opportunity. My dad had brought an e-bike over from China, but it wasn't very good."

 
visiobike-2014.jpg                 visiobike-2014-4.jpg visiobike-2014-5.jpg visiobike-2014-6.jpg visiobike-2014-3.jpg visiobike-2014-10.jpg visiobike-2014-12.jpg visiobike-2014-14.jpg visiobike-2014-13.jpg visiobike-2014-16.jpg visiobike-2014-11.jpg visiobike-2014-15.jpg visiobike-2014-2.jpg visiobike-2014-7.jpg visiobike-2014-8.jpg visiobike-2014-9.jpg  

"Most e-bikes have typical bike frames with a battery just stuck on and you can see even from a distance that it's an e-bike. We decided to change that. We have hired professional designers and we made this sleek, unique, unisex design. It's different. People have never seen anything like this before."

 

visiobike-2014-4.jpg                                                              

The bike is certainly striking. The frame is made entirely from carbon fibre which, apart from making it lighter than similar aluminium bikes, makes it incredibly strong. It's so strong in fact that it doesn't need a central column where the saddle would sit, which lends the bike an extra modern twist. In fact, our meeting on London's South Bank was interrupted on several occasions by passers-by who had wandered over to ask about the bike -- which wasn't at all annoying, when trying to take notes. Thanks, Londoners.

The bike isn't just a design statement though. "E-bikes today have very basic controls," explained Marko. "My other passion is technology and gadgets, so my logical conclusion was to combine technology [with an e-bike]."

 

visiobike-2014-12.jpg Andrew Hoyle/CNET

The Visiobike relies entirely on connecting with your smartphone -- the accompanying app will be on iOS and Android. To even turn the bike's motor on, you'll need to connect your phone over Bluetooth and input a security code. Once in, you're able to use Google Maps, track your route over GPS (as well as receive an alert if the bike is moved when you're not on it), and increase and decrease the amount of assistance the motor provides. Best of all, you can see behind you using a rear-facing camera positioned on the back of the saddle.

That camera is crucial to the bike's safety features. Its position lets you see traffic behind you, without needing to physically turn your head around, allowing you to focus on riding safely through traffic ahead. If you do have an accident, crash-detection sensors will set off a 60-second timer, after which your GPS location and a message will be sent to an emergency contact, unless you're able to stop it beforehand.

 

visiobike-2014-11.jpg Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Of course, all the tech in the world won't mean a lot if it's horrible to ride. Thankfully though, the Visiobike is anything but. During my tour around the South Bank, dodging between tourists, I found it extremely comfortable. The electric motor kicks in gradually, slowly increasing its assistance (you can use the app to set how much help you want from the motor) while the automatic NuVinci gears use moving spheres instead of cogs to provide a seamlessly smooth transition through the range of gears.

The motor means that there's very little effort required on your part to get round. The instant power of the motor makes setting off from stationary at traffic lights is extremely easy. Even going at high speed -- the motor can take you up to 45kph (28mph) with a range of 120km (75 miles) -- I didn't feel like I'd exerted myself. If you want a bike to cruise across the city in your suit, arriving at your meeting not having broken a sweat, the Visiobike will do the trick admirably. On the other hand, if you want a bike to help get some exercise, I recommend looking elsewhere -- the low effort involved in riding isn't going to help burn those calories.

 

visiobike-2014-10.jpg Andrew Hoyle/CNET

The downside to all this technology, however, is that it doesn't come cheap. It's on IndieGogo now, with a lofty target of €180,000, to be met by 7 July. A pledge of €3,900 (£3,170, $5,300, AU$5,730) is the minimum required to secure yourself a stripped-down model, with a slower 24kph (15mph) motor and without the automatic gears and rear-facing camera. You'll need to shell out €4,450 (£3,610, $6,050, AU$6,540) for the complete package.

The first run of bikes is scheduled to ship globally at the end of August, with following models being delivered on a "first come, first served" basis.

 

source

 

 

  A carbon fibre e-bike: built for Batman

 

Bike blog: Visiobike Visiobike: great design and tough, but expensive at £3,660. Photograph: Karl Mathiesen

 

The latest competitor in Europe's e-bike sector looks cool, but in a mean, angular way. And the design matches the price tag: £3,660.

 

Made of carbon-fibre and serious gadgetry, the Visiobike looks as if Batman decided to fight crime on low emissions. Its makers are billing it as a 'high-tech electric bicycle' and it certainly comes with a range of bells and whistles (but disappointingly it lacks an actual bell). The bike is controlled via a handlebar-mounted smartphone, giving riders the chance to stuff yet another aspect of their life into an app. While riding you swipe through a series of screens that show your navigation (via Google maps), speed, battery level and most interestingly the view from a rear vision camera set underneath the seat. The litigiously minded bike will also record and save the last three minutes of your ride if it senses a collision.

 

The operating system is also the main security feature. The bike requires a pin code to unlock the wheels, meaning the only way to steal it is to pick it up and lug it. If the bike senses it is being carried away it will send a message to your phone asking you if you wanted your bike moved. It will then keep you updated on its whereabouts until the police arrive. According to London e-bike dealer Justebikes , security features such as this deter thieves. Most bike theft in the capital is performed by experienced criminals, who know ebikes are more trouble than they are worth.

 

But it's not all high tech trinkets, there's some serious engineering too. When I get it humming along Regent's Canal and the back streets of King's Cross, the graduated gearing and practically silent 250W motor sense how much help I require and adjust automatically. There is a slight delay before the cavalry arrives, but when it does it makes the riding practically effortless.

 

The battery lasts between 25 and 62 mile depending on what 'assistance level' you set. Along the canal I leave it at 3 out of 10. It's a noticeable, if subtle difference. When I hit the traffic I use the smartphone control to dial it right up to the maximum, the transition comes with a little jolt and immediately the inner-city speed limit becomes a concern.

 

This is not a bike for cycling purists. But it's not pitched at the average cyclist. Up to 2m e-bikes were sold in Europe last year, mostly to commuters who want to cycle but still wear cool clothes. The Visiobike is pedal-assisted, rather than self-propelling. This collaboration with the motor gives a real reward-for-effort feeling. There's an ill-conceived ego boost as I shoot beyond the red light clutter without lifting out of the saddle. No one noticed it was an e-bike did they? Just a regular guy on some bike.

 

The downside is manoeuvrability. The motor is deliberately designed to delay before kicking in; otherwise it would throw the bike out of slow, tight turns. But this leaves you to muscle the 21kg brute alone. I struggle to tell it from a Boris bike as I wrestle it through the canal-side bike locks.

 

Here is a glimmer of what future cycling will be like, especially the camera and GPS. There are also plans to install a brake light on the next edition – all clever features that will probably be fitted to all bikes one day. But I would question whether this is revolutionary technology to match the revolutionary price tag. At nearly double the price of other commuter e-bikes, or indeed the price of a pretty decent used car, the Visiobike will need to attract people who simply would not have bought a bike unless it has a rear vision camera. This market (cyclists with neck problems perhaps?) may exist but I'll keep looking over my own shoulder.

 

 

Visiobike

source

 

 

 

 

 

 * solar-powered bike lock of the future

n addition to solar energy, the Skylock device boasts Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, keyless entry via a iOS or Android mobile app, and even motion sensing capabilities.

By Craig Manning, Daily Digest News
Saturday, May 17, 2014


Meet the solar-powered bike lock of the future

 

If you have ever had to deal with a stolen or stripped bicycle, pay attention: Velo Labs, a company co-founded by former Boeing engineer Jack Al-Kahwati, has invented a new solar-powered smart lock for bicycles, and it is the kind of innovation that could change the game as far as bike security and safety are concerned.

In Al-Kahwati’s estimation, “the bike is still stuck in the 19th century,” even as virtually every other form of transportation has received sleek modernized updates that make them safer, more secure, and infinitely harder to steal. Velo Labs wanted to take those same adjectives and apply them to the bike, and they have done so by developing a bike lock that sounds like it could outsmart a lot of would-be thefts.

source 26/5/14

 

 

World's First Electric Wooden Bike Leads The Charge To Sustainable Cycling 


Bough Bikes is a world leader in the field of handmade all-wood bicycles, having produced over 300 pedal-powered two-wheelers from sustainably harvested French Oak. Now the Dutch manufacturer is, ahem, branching out into electrobikes, showing off two prototype electric wooden bikes at this year's NYCxDesign

The basic model Bough Bike has been turning heads and changing minds for several years now though most of the company's output has stayed in their native Holland. Bough Bikes CEO and co-designer Piet Brandjes has always kept the focus on quality rather than quantity, specifying the use of high quality parts to complement the bike's precisely engineered and carefully balanced wooden frame.




Though Bough Bikes have generally received glowing reviews from owners and testers alike, the sturdy cycle does have one drawback: at 20 kg (44 pounds), it's kind of heavy. If only there was some way to make driving the Bough Bike easier... and actually, there is! These days electric motors are more powerful than ever before and the batteries needed to power them continue to shrink in size and weight. The time is right, thought Brandjes, for an electrified version of his wooden wunder.

- See more at: http://inventorspot.com/articles/worlds-first-electric-wooden-bike-leads-charge-sustainable-cycli#sthash.LhMudE4e.dpuf

 

* World's first Wooden Electric Bicyle !

World's First Electric Wooden Bike Leads The Charge To Sustainable Cycling       7 submit to reddit    


Bough Bikes is a world leader in the field of handmade all-wood bicycles, having produced over 300 pedal-powered two-wheelers from sustainably harvested French Oak. Now the Dutch manufacturer is, ahem, branching out into electrobikes, showing off two prototype electric wooden bikes at this year's NYCxDesign

The basic model Bough Bike has been turning heads and changing minds for several years now though most of the company's output has stayed in their native Holland. Bough Bikes CEO and co-designer Piet Brandjes has always kept the focus on quality rather than quantity, specifying the use of high quality parts to complement the bike's precisely engineered and carefully balanced wooden frame.




Though Bough Bikes have generally received glowing reviews from owners and testers alike, the sturdy cycle does have one drawback: at 20 kg (44 pounds), it's kind of heavy. If only there was some way to make driving the Bough Bike easier... and actually, there is! These days electric motors are more powerful than ever before and the batteries needed to power them continue to shrink in size and weight. The time is right, thought Brandjes, for an electrified version of his wooden wunder.

- See more at: http://inventorspot.com/articles/worlds-first-electric-wooden-bike-leads-charge-sustainable-cycli#sthash.LhMudE4e.dpuf World's First Electric Wooden Bike Leads The Charge To Sustainable Cycling       7 submit to reddit    


Bough Bikes is a world leader in the field of handmade all-wood bicycles, having produced over 300 pedal-powered two-wheelers from sustainably harvested French Oak. Now the Dutch manufacturer is, ahem, branching out into electrobikes, showing off two prototype electric wooden bikes at this year's NYCxDesign

The basic model Bough Bike has been turning heads and changing minds for several years now though most of the company's output has stayed in their native Holland. Bough Bikes CEO and co-designer Piet Brandjes has always kept the focus on quality rather than quantity, specifying the use of high quality parts to complement the bike's precisely engineered and carefully balanced wooden frame.




Though Bough Bikes have generally received glowing reviews from owners and testers alike, the sturdy cycle does have one drawback: at 20 kg (44 pounds), it's kind of heavy. If only there was some way to make driving the Bough Bike easier... and actually, there is! These days electric motors are more powerful than ever before and the batteries needed to power them continue to shrink in size and weight. The time is right, thought Brandjes, for an electrified version of his wooden wunder.

- See more at: http://inventorspot.com/articles/worlds-first-electric-wooden-bike-leads-charge-sustainable-cycli#sthash.LhMudE4e.dpuf World's First Electric Wooden Bike Leads The Charge To Sustainable Cycling       7 submit to reddit    


Bough Bikes is a world leader in the field of handmade all-wood bicycles, having produced over 300 pedal-powered two-wheelers from sustainably harvested French Oak. Now the Dutch manufacturer is, ahem, branching out into electrobikes, showing off two prototype electric wooden bikes at this year's NYCxDesign

The basic model Bough Bike has been turning heads and changing minds for several years now though most of the company's output has stayed in their native Holland. Bough Bikes CEO and co-designer Piet Brandjes has always kept the focus on quality rather than quantity, specifying the use of high quality parts to complement the bike's precisely engineered and carefully balanced wooden frame.




Though Bough Bikes have generally received glowing reviews from owners and testers alike, the sturdy cycle does have one drawback: at 20 kg (44 pounds), it's kind of heavy. If only there was some way to make driving the Bough Bike easier... and actually, there is! These days electric motors are more powerful than ever before and the batteries needed to power them continue to shrink in size and weight. The time is right, thought Brandjes, for an electrified version of his wooden wunder.

With electric power, weight is no longer an issue – ever try lifting one of the more popular electric bicycles or scooters? The remarkably unobtrusive and easily removable power pack can get a Bough Bike moving at up to 15 mph and keep it moving for up to 30 miles.




Riders enjoy a certain amount of flexibility on how they apply electric power to their riding experience. See, not every bike rider wants their journey to be effortlessly smooth. With that in mind, Bough installed a compact speed regulator just beneath the bike's handlebars.

Riders can select from Low, Med or High settings – after a single pedal, the motor kicks in to the degree chosen with the net effect being a heavy bicycle becomes instantly lighter, quicker and more maneuverable. The regulator also features a battery charge display and speaking of which, the battery can be fully charged in 3 to 6 hours.




As mentioned, only two prototype electric Bough Bikes have been produced. Real-world testing on the mean streets of New York City has already offered a number of possible improvements that could see the light of day on production versions, such as energy-harvesting wheel hubs that are the biking analogue of the regenerative braking systems used in hybrid automobiles.

When actual production electric Bough Bikes will be available, however, is a question that has no answer at present. Hopefully that day will come sooner rather than later. Wood it be good? You'd better be leaf it! (via PSFK, photos by Dave Pinter

- See more at: http://inventorspot.com/articles/worlds-first-electric-wooden-bike-leads-charge-sustainable-cycli#sthash.nvg9Cjpr.dpuf

source  24/5/14

 

 

 

* SRKR Engg college !

Solar-powered tricycle for physically challenged    T    Solar-powered tricycle for physically challenged developed by S.R.K.R. Engineering College students on display at Bhimavaram in West Godavari.

 

The Hindu Solar-powered tricycle for physically challenged developed by S.R.K.R. Engineering College students on display at Bhimavaram in West Godavari. TOPICS A group of engineering students from S.R.K.R. Engineering College develop the cycle. A battery fitted to the tricycle stores solar power and helps it run for 5-6 hours.

It is nice to see College students and colleges are getting interested in coming up with innovative products, particularly using solar energy.

The future is bright for India . This is the way to go for Indian college students and academia.

A solar-powered tricycle fabricated by a group of engineering students from S.R.K.R. Engineering College here helps the physically challenged defy their disability and move around freely like any other normal person.

The students developed the vehicle with a financial aid of Rs. 50,000, extended by the Institute of Engineers, Kolkata, in a period of six months under the guidance of V. Durga Prasad, Professor in Civil Engineering. The students involved in the project were Vivek, Lokesh, Bhavishya, Sudha, Chandini and Sadgun, all from the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Eco-friendly

A battery fitted to the tricycle stores solar power and helps it run for 5-6 hours. Mr. Durga Prasad said the tricycle could accommodate two-persons, including the driver, and run at a speed ranging between 15-20 km. He said the solar power-based tricycle was developed in their college when only hand-driven vehicles were in use. It is 100 per cent eco-friendly and pollution free, he asserted. Mr. Durga Prasad said the upgraded tricycle could run manually and with solar power as well. The college principal D. Ganga Raju appreciated the students for their novel initiative.

According to Mr. Durga Prasad, the college management has permitted the Department of Mechanical Engineering to fabricate the latest version of the tricycles in large numbers, depending on the demand from the physically challenged. A few physically challenged students of the college are using the power-based tricycle presently.

source 24/5/14

 

Solar battery charging stations for Solar bicycles : Cost  & Benefits

 

4

By Pat Young

For Hometown News

John Esposito and his wife, Kathleen, live in a comfortable Port Orange home.

They each have a vehicle, but neither one fits in the two-car garage. That's because Mr. Esposito, a self-described "tinkerer," has appropriated the garage for his workshop, where his ever-active mind is forever creating things -- most recently an electric bike.

"I wouldn't describe myself as an inventor," he says. "But I'd like to help with the overall problem with global warming and reducing our dependence on carbon fuels."

That's where his interest in alternative energy transportation kicks in.

The seeds for his "lifelong interest in electrical propulsion systems" were planted years ago in his youth, when he said he "put motors on everything," from model planes and cars to go karts and bicycles. That morphed into machining, wood-working, electric hobbies, radio control, computers, anything with wheels, and many things that make music.

He built many musical instruments, including a banjo he taught himself to play.

Mr. Esposito has degrees in physics and electrical engineering from the State University of New York-Buffalo. As an aerospace and satellite engineer, he worked for Lockheed Martin, General Electric and Hughes Aircraft Co. in California, Seattle, Washington, New York and Pennsylvania. He worked on many launches at Cape Canaveral for both shuttle and Titan programs.

The semi-retired engineer said, "I worked with a lot of pioneers and innovators in avionics and space industries. I got very interested in alternative energy transportation."

His interest in electro-mechanical systems continues to grow.

A Florida transplant of one year, he now spends a lot of time on E-bikes (electric bicycles), building a few for himself as a hobby, and then for friends.

He noticed electric bicycles were selling -- big time. In China, sales went from 56,000 to 120 million in 12 years. They now sell more than 30 million a year. In Western Europe and India, sales are similarly explosive.

There is a "massive uptake" worldwide, except in the United States. But the U.S. is becoming more "bike centric," he believes, as we become more energy conscious.

The cost of using an electric bike compared to a car is dramatic. It costs about 20 cents to charge an electric bike (to go about 35 miles). A week of commuting costs about a dollar, compared to a car at about $40-50 in gas. (Of course, there is the foul-weather factor and the time factor.)

The electric-assist bike (E-bike) travels at about 20 mph, similar to a Moped. (In Florida, if an E-bike travels 20 mph or less, it is an assisted bike, not a motorcycle.) The E-bike is a new concept in transportation, according to Mr. Esposito. Also known as a Pedelec ("pedal-electric"), this human-electric hybrid is a normal bike with a lithium ion battery and a small electric motor, increasing the range and speed of the bike.

"So, for the person who wants to commute to work or the store without getting sweaty, these bikes are a great solution," he said. He added they are good for the person of limited physical ability as well.

"However, for a fit/normal person who utilizes bicycles for exercise and enjoyment, the E-bike opens up new vistas. A 40-mile ride is now routine, expanding dramatically both the distance and duration of the bike riding experience while still getting excellent exercise."

An E-bike can be bought online or at a bike shop for between $1,400 and $3,000. To build one costs about $600.

"Bikes are the most efficient mode of transportation humans have invented," Mr. Esposito said. "But with the advent of new lithium ion batteries and lightweight motors, they represent a breakthrough in transportation."

But Mr. Esposito not stopping with bikes. He's working on an electric propulsion for kayaks, and he's thinking of building an electric trike for people with limited mobility. He's also thinking about an economic way to convert cars to electric.

"I'd like to take one old car and put an electric motor in it," he said. "From a hobby point of view, we have all these wonderful cars around us, and I'd like to figure out a way to convert them economically."

He's working on a solar charging station for batteries, to extend the E-bike's potential. He routinely travels from Daytona Beach to Ormond Beach and back in a few hours on his E-bike, saying he gets plenty of exercise and enjoys the scenery. He noted not many people are using E-bikes -- yet. But those who do ride them find the bikes handy, especially when crossing causeways or going up hills.

He's looking for like-minded individuals who have an interest in E-bikes, and he's thinking of starting a MeetUp group for this. (Interested people can reach him at jaespojr@gmail.com.)

"Technology is going to get a lot easier to use," Mr. Esposito said, pausing, the wheels turning in his head. "I might even put an iPhone app on a bike."

This article should give confidence to the Indian students and academia, to work on Solar battery charging stations for solar bicycles . This will generate

considerable jobs for Indian students. Like petrol bunks, we can have solar battery charging stations. Solar cycles can be parked and charged.

 

costs in INdia will be much lower than is mentioned in the article.

source 24/5/14

 

 

 

* eLECTRIC BICYCLES / SOLAR BICYCLES - A SOLUTION TO POLLUTION !!?

n China, it's not uncommon to see electric bicycles, or e-bikes, racing down roadways, keeping up with the heavy automobile traffic. No testing requirement exists for e-bike drivers, and the cost in human terms is grisly.

In 2007, there were 2,469 deaths in China from electric-bicycle accidents, up from just 34 in 2001, according to government statistics. That's 4.1 percent of the 60,000 deaths China sees from road accidents each year, according to police statistics. The US, by comparison, had about 33,000 road traffic deaths in 2010, according to the World Health Organization's (WHO) 2013 road safety report.

E-bikes were involved in 57 percent of serious nonfatal road accidents in a hospital in Suzhou, Jiangsu province, according to a Peking University-led research study conducted between October 2010 and April 2011. Some 36 percent of injured riders suffered traumatic brain injuries, according to the study.

E-bikes are "involved in crashes at a very high level," possibly because of their speed, according to

Brent Powis, a WHO road safety consultant. The users tend to be former cyclists who are ignorant of traffic rules and prone to "lots of risky behavior and a lack of risk awareness," Powis said.

 

 

China has become a giant test case for the electric-bicycle revolution. But can it prevent this potential solution to the country's transport and pollution problems from becoming a public health risk? That is the question.

Electric bicycles were around for a couple of decades before China embraced them wholeheartedly. Today, some 200 million Chinese ride e-bikes. Around 90 per cent of the world's e-bikes were sold in China in 2012, according to Colorado consulting firm Navigant Research. Another 249 million are expected to be sold in the country by 2020.

Rechargeable e-bikes began appealing strongly to residents as Chinese cities began limiting the number of cars on roads to hold down pollution. Although e-bikes can travel up to 40 km/h, authorities tend to regard them as bicycles.

China's e-bike industry started in the 1960s but the battery and engine technology of the time was deemed unsuitable. With China's opening of relations in the West came an effort to popularize e-bikes. As a 1990 ban on motor scooters and mopeds kicked in, electric bikes gained government support. An epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, in 2003, drove up e-bike sales as commuters sought an alternative to crowded public transport, where germs spread quickly. Unfortunately, e-bike fatalities rose, too. In 2003, 87 people were killed in e-bike accidents. A year later, 589 died.

The deaths led to a backlash. Some cities imposed bans on e-bikes or handed out tickets for e-bikes that violated weight and speed restrictions, or didn't have proper registration.

There's an economic downside to the accidents as well. Road crashes cost 1 per cent to 5 per cent of gross domestic product in developing countries, World Bank president Jim Yong Kim wrote in the foreword of a March report on the growing burden of all traffic injuries.

But as pollution afflicts Chinese cities, municipal restrictions on vehicle ownership have increased.

"Simply put, e-bikes couple very low costs with very high mobility, making them very attractive," Christopher Cherry, associate professor in civil and environmental engineering at the University of Tennessee, who has researched the two wheelers in China, was quoted by Bloomberg.

In the end, road safety proponents aren't arguing for fewer e-bikes - just more regulation. "Helmets, driving lessons, road safety rules - how they tackle this can define the direction of green transportation around the world," Powis said.

Riders' willingness to be responsible - that is, making an effort to be aware of what's around them at all times - ultimately will determine the resolution of this issue.

SOURCE 21/05/14

 

LG Entering E-Bike Batteries Market??? LG Chem (part of the Korean electronics giant LG) is reviewing a plan to plunge into the business of making e-bike batteries after seeing a clear sign that the market is indeed growing. This was reported yesterday by the Korean IT Times. After Samsung, Bosch and Panasonic this is he next world electronics player stepping into the e-bike market.

Other consumer electronics giants involved in e-bikes are Samsung, Bosch and Panasonic. - Photo Bike Europe

Other consumer electronics giants involved in e-bikes are Samsung, Bosch and Panasonic. - Photo Bike Europe

The Korean Times reported further that Samsung SDI president Park Sang-jin said: "If the main means of transportation in the future are restructured around electric cars and rail cars, most short distance travels will be covered by electric bikes. We are very optimistic about the battery market for e-bikes. About 30% lighter than the same-class lead-acid batteries, lithium-ion batteries can travel 60 kilometres of distance at 25 km an hour in a single charge."

 

Primary growth area

 

The Korean Times report also says: "LG Chem is reviewing a plan to plunge into the business of making e-bike batteries after seeing a clear sign that the market is indeed growing."

 

LG Chem Ltd. is a 14 billion US dollar Korea-based company. Lithium-ion batteries are part of LG Chem's Information and Electronic Materials business and have been identified as a primary growth area for the company. In fact, investment in lithium-ion batteries has grown five-fold over the past seven years.

 

Panasonic Cycle Technology

 

Other consumer electronics giants involved in e-bikes are Samsung, Bosch and Panasonic. At last year's Eurobike Panasonic presented the world's smallest e-bike drive system. Panasonic Cycle Technology's direct drive mid-motor features 3-sensors and maximum torque stands of 65 Nm. The company installed a Munich-Germany based service-team for the European market last year Courtesy

 

First ever electric motorcycle : sneak peek

Cut above the rest??

Watch video

 

The Brammo Empulse is one badass electric motorcycle, and this cutaway video goes beneath the skin of this electric crotch rocket to show what makes it go.

As we covered in our reviews, the Brammo Empulse is no joke on either the streets or the race track. But what makes it all go? That’s where Brammo’s Brian Wismann comes in, as he takes us on a technical overview of the high-tech inner workings that make the Empulse one of the best electric motorcycles on the market.

With a 110 MPH top speed and up to 128 miles of city driving (55 miles of highway cruising) between charges, the Brammo Empulse is also the only electric motorcycle with an on-board 3kW charger. This gives it access to over 7,000 Level 2 fast chargers, which allows the 9.3 kWh lithium-ion battery pack to be completely recharged in less than two hours. All of that for a starting price of $16,995, or $18,995 for the hotter-performing Empulse RR.

The almost-six-minute video gets pretty damn technical, and I know some of you really love this sort of thing. So instead of me babbling on about this and that, just hit the play button and let Brian explain to you what makes the Brammo Empulse so damn awesome. Courtesy: Cleantechnica

 Solar Glow bicycle : Amazing design

 

A bicycle which lights up in the dark could be the next big trend for urban cycling.

Lumen is a patented design which features reflective particles embedded in its steel frame, which is an iridescent grey color by day. However, once evening falls, the entire bike frame reflects light, making riders extra visible to city traffic.

No batteries or on/off switch are required, as the microscopic reflective spheres are built into the design principle. The ‘glow' effect is visible from up to 1,000 feet (over 300 meters) away.

The brainchild of San Francisco-based studio Mission Bicycle Company, the inspiration for the design came from the reflective effect found on street signs. The brand worked in collaboration with Halo Coatings to develop an innovative technology which allows reflective particles to be applied to 3D structures.

Similar concepts include the solar-powered Glow Fixie luminous bike frames and Monkeylectric's LED wheel art lights.

Currently listed on crowdfunding website Kickstarter, Mission Bicycle guarantees that the Lumen will function for 50 years. Shipping is expected to begin this July 

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A fully GLOW-in-the-dark fixed gear bike!

Get ready to take your night riding to a whole new level. After months of experimentation, we've perfected the GLOW, our newest line. The name says it all, it actually glows. The paint is solar-activated, so just give your bike an hour of daytime sun for an hour plus of night-time fun. Whether you're a night owl, a raver, or just want to trip out your friends, this is the bike for you. Courtesy

The most inspirational story of Rhyno electric motor-cycle: Chris Hoffmann interview

Six years ago, Portland-based engineer Chris Hoffmann was driving with his 13-year-old daughter Lauren to go fishing. On the journey, out of the silence, Lauren said, “Daddy, I’ve been thinking about this one-wheeled motorcycle I saw in a video game. Could you actually build something like that?" What happened next changed his life.

 

In the next few months, Chris begins shipping the first production version of the Ryno, a self-balancing, one-wheeled US$5250 personal mobility device that has caused tidal waves of interest across the internet with global distribution and manufacturing on several continents in planning. This is Chris Hoffmann’s story of what happened in the intervening six years, in his own words.

 

The Dragon Ball video game that Lauren Hoffmann asked her father about six years ago

 

The Dragon Ball video game that Lauren Hoffmann asked her father about six years ago

 

 

 

Chris takes up the story: “I said to her, ‘what does it look like?’ While we were riding along, she got out a piece of paper and sketched it and that’s where it all started. She showed me the sketch and we started talking about it and she knows I’m an engineer and we talked it through while we were driving."

 

This is the original sketch that Lauren Hoffmann drew for her dad that day in the car six ...

 

This is the original sketch that Lauren Hoffmann drew for her dad that day in the car six years ago

 

 

 

"I said, ‘you know, there’s self-balancing technology that is used on the Segway that could work on something like that, and if we took a big motorcycle tire and … hmmmm … it’s definitely not impossible.'

 

"So I started thinking about it and it got me intrigued.

 

“When I got home I got on the internet and started looking for that one part that’s missing and is going to stop you from doing what you want to do, and I couldn’t find it. I just kept finding what I wanted. It was around 2008 when gyro technology started getting really cheap. All those little radio-controlled helicopters have gyros in them now and the sensors you need for that technology are also cheap and actually predate the iPhone because it has one inside. Back at the time the Segway came out, that type of technology cost you $500 and now it’s more like $10, so that didn’t stop me."

 

The beginnings of the journey - a bunch of parts ordered over the internet

 

The beginnings of the journey - a bunch of parts ordered over the internet

 

 

 

“I looked for motor controllers and servo motors and things like that and … you know it’s funny that this Battlebots TV show and all these competitive robot competitions have created a whole cottage industry of geeks making controllers and boards and motors for these robots and they were all the perfect size for this little transportation device I was scoping. So I was able to search on the internet and I was able to go, 'here’s a little motor controller for $150' and 'here’s another bit I need' and … pretty soon I was doing some sketches to figure out how to package all the bits together."Courtesy : GIZMAG

 

Chris Hoffmann's workshop where the formative ideas took shape

 

Chris Hoffmann's workshop where the formative ideas took shape

 

 

 

“It’s amazing what you can do on the internet these days – what you can pull together just sitting in front of your computer. I quite literally found my software-hardware guy on the internet because he had posted a web site about how to make a wooden Segway as a kit project. Most other things I needed I found there too.

 

“Then I took a machine shop class and using the skills I acquired, I built the first prototype. I’d spent 15 years in the auto industry designing big heavy plant-sized machinery, so I’m a pretty good mechanical engineer and I spent five years in consumer product development doing circuit boards and electronics and communications gear, so I know how to talk to those guys.

 

“The very first prototype was just an exploration. I took my mountain bike and cut the frame in half and took the seat off and put the handlebars where the seat was and then put some foam on the parcel shelf on the back and tried to see if I could ride it around. I did that just to get my head around how you would ride on one wheel and that was … well … impossible.

 

Chris experimenting in order to get the gyro stabilization worked out

 

Chris experimenting in order to get the gyro stabilization worked out

 

 

 

“So it was important to get the gyro stabilization sorted out … I didn’t want to make three prototypes, I just want to make one that worked and looked great, … so I built this beautiful hammered aluminum, aircraft-looking prototype and figured it would just steer around a turn like a coin rolling around a corner, but when I got on the thing, it was … impossible."

 

Chris Hoffmann on the first full RYNO prototype: 'I built this beautiful hammered aluminiu...

 

Chris Hoffmann on the first full RYNO prototype: "I built this beautiful hammered aluminium, aircraft-looking prototype and figured it would just steer around a turn like a coin rolling around a corner, but when I got on the thing, it was … impossible."

 

 

 

"I mean you could hardly get it to go in a straight line because it was just an anvil on one wheel. It would balance front-to-back, but there was just no way to impart a twist on the thing.

 

“So my software guy and I got together and said, ‘now what?' We were thinking about all types of crazy ideas such as flywheels spinning and two tires side-by-side and he was looking at me going, ‘dude, it’s a controls nightmare. It’s going to be too expensive to build and it’s going to be too complicated – it’s gotta be dirt simple.’

 

“Well, in the end, the thing I figured we could do was just add steering. He was like, ‘well that doesn’t make sense – it’s only one wheel – how does that work’?

 

Chris Hoffmann on the second RYNO prototype: 'I got on it and I just rode off, just like a...

 

Chris Hoffmann on the second RYNO prototype: "I got on it and I just rode off, just like a bike. I was riding around the neighborhood inside 15 minutes. I was riding around doing figure eights. It just totally blew me away because it worked really well."

 

 

 

"In the end, we built a frame and just added handlebars. He loaded the software and we took it over to my house and I got on it and I just rode off, just like a bike. I was riding around the neighborhood inside 15 minutes. I was riding around doing figure eights. It just totally blew me away because it worked really well.

 

“We had both got to that place of ‘maybe this is gonna work and if it doesn’t work, we’re done, we gotta go get jobs.’

 

“But it did work, so we took it back to the shop and welded some body panels on it and bondo'd it and painted it and filed some patents and shot some videos and put them on the internet and it got picked up and we started watching the number of views grind away and before long we got to the point where we realized that people really liked this thing and that it was viable.

 

“It wasn’t until we took it downtown and started riding it around that we realized just quite what a utilitarian product it is. When you ride it onto the train and no-one says anything, and you go in an elevator with it and no-one is backing away from it and people start asking you about it and when you go on the street and people start pulling their phones out and begin taking pictures of it, you realize that this thing had something going for it.

 

“Then we built another prototype. We figured we could take it another step. We said, ‘what’s this thing really gotta be’?

 

“We figured that we would make it street legal like a scooter, 25 mph less, 750 watts of motor power, add suspension, a bigger seat, euro styling … so I actually sold my house and got some cash together and we spent about $45 grand on this one prototype and … it was a total failure.

 

Chris Hoffmann on the third RYNO prototype: “We figured that we would make it street legal...

 

Chris Hoffmann on the third RYNO prototype: “We figured that we would make it street legal like a scooter, 25 mph less, 750 watts of motor power, add suspension, a bigger seat, euro styling … so I actually sold my house and got some cash together and we spent about $45 grand on this one prototype and … it was a total failure."

 

 

 

“It failed on so many levels. 750 watts is not enough power for this thing to do what it needs to do and we had added suspension to it which had sort of decoupled the handlebars from the gyros inside the wheel.

 

“There’s a very subtle way you pilot one of these … by pushing the handlebars down to go faster or pulling pack to slow down … and having the suspension was like you were pushing against a marshmallow. I’d never thought about that on the drawing board but I got on it and tried to ride it, it was like … OMG, this totally fake.

 

“When you’re a start-up, there’s just not a budget for doing a lot of engineering prototypes. You can’t just take half a dozen fabricators and knock some stuff together and test it and go back and do it again and again. You don’t have the money for a test stand or a dyno … you just have to take your best shot.

 

“What was funny about that prototype though, was that we put some pictures up on the internet and we started getting a lot of emails of people that wanted to buy it because it looked so cool.

 

“I think we got five people who were prepared to give us US$25,000 apiece for these things … and here I was struggling to get it to even work properly.

 

“So to fit all that stuff inside the wheel we needed a big wheel and it’s not so much that...

 

“So to fit all that stuff inside the wheel we needed a big wheel and it’s not so much that we wanted the bike to have a big wheel so it looked bad-ass, it’s just that the wheel IS the body, so we looked around to find the right tire and we came up with an off-the-shelf, 18 x 240 sports motorcycle tire and rim."

 

 

 

“It was right at this point where I met my operations guy Tony Humpage, he’s my right hand man. He has an MBA, and he’s an old school British guy who has done a lot of start-ups and he looked at me and said “dude, if you build those five bikes, you’re gonna get stuck in a garage building one-wheel bikes for the rest of your life, so stop doing that and let’s get together and write a business plan and let’s see if we can get this thing to scale.’

 

“And that’s when we started working together and we wrote that plan and raised the first US$1.3 million.

 

“He pushed me out of that classic inventors dilemma. Inventors always feel frustrated and they want to make progress so they go back to the garage and just keep polishing up the same thing, thinking they’re adding value when it’s not always the right thing to do. There are times when you need to stop doing that and do something that’s a little outside your comfort zone.

 

“For me, that was the beginning of a completely different journey in becoming the CEO and manager of a company.”

 

“If you want to drive down the road at 25 mph or faster, then go buy a Vespa scooter.”

 

“If you want to drive down the road at 25 mph or faster, then go buy a Vespa scooter.”Courtesy : GIZMAG

 

 

 

Gizmag: What’s next in the evolution of the Ryno?

 

“Obviously we will develop the next version of the Ryno. It’s obvious what we need to do. It will be better if we make it lighter, a bit smaller, extend the range, but I think the sweet spot is still in that 10 mph range because it’s a low-speed, meandering-around-town mobility solution that mixes with pedestrians and let’s you hang out with other people without scaring them and making them back up.

 

“If you want to drive down the road at 25 mph or faster, then go buy a Vespa scooter.”

 

Gizmag: I noticed that you are not using lithium ion batteries in the standard US$5250 Ryno, and that you can have lithium Ion batteries if you’re prepared to pay extra. Obviously, that additional cost is considerable right now, but is there a time when you foresee it being part of the standard offering?

 

“We’re tracking battery technology very carefully right now along with everybody else, and the lithium ion battery manufacturing process is getting really refined and it’s going through a transition right now into a more mature technology – it’s a bit like the hard drive industry was a few years back where the material science all of a sudden gets really good and the cost starts to fall quickly.

 

“Lithium ion batteries have always been made by a couple of big companies that have managed to get the chemistry right and they have to get the separator materials perfected and they do it in-house. Now, we’re seeing mid-level suppliers emerging that sell rolls of separator material and they’re selling the good chemistry and they’re selling the packaging so there’s all these companies now that are able to layer up this little lithium ion sandwich and seal it up in a little tin-foil bag that looks like a pop-tart, and they’re getting really good at it, so the price is starting to come down.

 

“So adding lithium ion batteries to the Ryno will probably come down to around US$1000 in the next year, which will make everything a quantum leap more viable again for really useful, viable personal mobility appliances. It’s an exciting time, because the technology is finally maturing.”

 

Gizmag: The tire is a motorcycle tire. How did that come about?

 

“The iconic thing about a Ryno is that everything is inside the wheel and then you have this tubular steel frame that sits up on top and it kinds of looks like magic, because people look at it and say ‘hey, where’s the motor?’

 

“So to fit all that stuff inside the wheel we needed a big wheel and it’s not so much that we wanted the bike to have a big wheel so it looked bad-ass, it’s just that the wheel is the body, so we looked around to find the right tire and we came up with an off-the-shelf, 18 x 240 sports motorcycle tire and rim.

 

“So instead of having spokes on the rim, we built a wheel center just like the spare tire on a car, and we mounted it way over on the side, so we have a conventional motorcycle rim and there’s an offset, stamped steel wheel center that allows us to mount all the machinery and electronics and batteries and the wheel sits around the outside.”Courtesy : GIZMAG

 

Gizmag: Will Ryno develop other products?

 

“Ahhhh … (reluctantly) … I can probably talk about it, mainly because I don’t think anyone else is going to do it, but I wouldn’t mind doing a self-balancing hydrofoil jet ski. Hydrofoils are very efficient, they take out all the friction, so much great speed on water is possible. Just look at what they’ve done for Americas Cup sailing speeds."

 

'A self-balancing hydrofoil jet ski like one of those hydrofoil wakeboards, but without th...

 

"A self-balancing hydrofoil jet ski like one of those hydrofoil wakeboards, but without the ski boat, now that will be really bad-ass for a whole new bunch of people. That’s one of the things I’ve been looking at doing."

 

 

 

"A self-balancing hydrofoil jet ski like one of those hydrofoil wakeboards, but without the ski boat, now that will be really bad-ass for a whole new bunch of people. That’s one of the things I’ve been looking at doing."

 

Gizmag: What makes the Ryno different as a Personal Mobility Product?

 

“As cities get more crowded and people are forced to get closer and crowd together in big cities, there’s something about the Ryno’s ability to spin around on its axis, and that most of the machinery is hidden and silent, that makes it non-threatening. The rider-to-pedestrian interface is a leg-to-leg interface, an eye-to-eye interface, a person-to-person interface. Unlike a car or a motorcycle or a pushbike, there’s no barrier, so the Ryno feels approachable … and the fact when I stop I put my feet on the ground and the vehicle feels and looks very stable, so people don’t feel like they need to back up and get away from it, like it’s going to run their toes over.

 

“It’s funny how the non-threatening nature of the Ryno has such an impact when you roll up to a group of people. It’s more like you’re hanging out with them … everyone feels like they are at the same level. It’s eye-to-eye, like the rider is accepted as a peer, like we’re together, as opposed to other vehicles where either you’re eight inches higher than pedestrians and need to get down and step off to one side, or a bicycle where you’re sitting on this thing and if everybody needs to move a little to the right, you need to get off and wheel it around and … it’s not the same.

 

Even though you ride the RYNO solo – it doesn’t mean you can’t take things with you. The U...

 

“The Ryno is different because it can move and pivot freely, like a human can, so the rider can mingle with footpath users, just meander and flow with the movement of the people. I think that ability to mix with people is the Ryno’s biggest attribute – it’s ability to move gently in slow motion in a crowd, its non-threatening movement in a crowd, it’s ability to appear as stable as a human and just hang out in the crowd, to move 50 feet up the pavement and stop and put your feet down and look in the window.

 

“It’s not like a Vespa scooter where you get on it and just commute – that’s what a scooter does. It goes on the road an it commutes, like a car. The Ryno is different. It’s not necessarily going to get people out of their car, but if you can picture how you transition from one form of transportation to another, if you think about pedestrian traffic, where people are on foot, and as pedestrians they are on foot, and can only really comfortably go about ten blocks before they get tired, that’s the Ryno’s environment.

 

“There’s this unconscious notion we all have that we have to get into a car to go farther than five blocks. Well, the Ryno is going to push those boundaries outwards … a lot. It’s a mobility aid for people who aren’t mobility impaired. Instead of meandering five blocks, you can meander five or ten miles and back and you won’t get tired … and you can do it at the same pace as a professional athlete, and you still won’t get tired.

 

“It’s funny how the non-threatening nature of the Ryno has such an impact when you roll up...

 

“I think things are going to change a lot due to the advent of these new personal micro transportation devices. Now they’re available and affordable and viable, we can now put the cars on the periphery of a much larger area and allow people to just wander around without having to mingle with big metal objects that weigh a ton potentially running over someone and hurting them – these devices will enable people to wander around in an assisted way – in a way that allows them to cover more ground.

 

“So whether it’s the Ryno or whether it’s some sort of small one- or two- or three-wheeled device, I think as people can mentally start to think about this middle ground of personal mobility, then new things are possible. We now have technologies available to us, so we can rearrange what we have to make it more liveable, more pleasant ... much safer. This new way makes more sense.

 

“If you start thinking about how that level of personal mobility, with its very small footprint that’s not much bigger than a human being, can get onto a train, and the train can transport it to the general area of where they want to be, then they use the mobility device to complete the journey, then you see a very different transport ecosystem, one for which the transport infrastructure is largely in place already.

 

The Ryno has a top speed of around 10 mph. It comes with two operational settings, “beginn...

 

“Trains could begin with a compartment or car allocated to personal mobility products, and if more people start to use them, then more cars on the train could be allocated over time. I’m not talking about a bike rack in the front of the train, I’m talking eventually a whole train where the door opens up and everybody with their little mobility products get on and off, and everyone can go from one point in a city to another, or even from city to city. The train takes them from inside one personal mobility circle to another personal mobility circle.

 

“When you do that, things start to change. We don’t need to have a city street wide enough for a massive truck to reach every front door in a city.

 

“To me, this concept looks viable. I would challenge people – academics, city planners, students, to do a study, a computer simulation, an impact assessment and take that concept to the next level because I really think that is where we need to go in the future.

 

“I was surprised at first because I’d go into a presentation and I would start talking abo...

 

“I was surprised at first because I’d go into a presentation and I would start talking about the product and how awesome it is and all the technical part and they’d say, ‘we don’t care about that, we get it, we get the one-wheeled thing and you’re an engineer and we believe you can build it, now tell us how we’re going to make money?’Courtesy : GIZMAG

 

 

 

Gizmag: So what have learned about business and the entrepreneurial process that you can pass on to your fellow entrepreneurs and inventors?

 

“Wherever the idea comes from, whether it’s pure inspiration, or trying to solve a problem or wherever, you must take that idea into the marketplace and show it to people and see if it shows up the way you think it does. If you’re a band, you have to go play the subway at some time and see if people put money in the hat. That’s the first step. That prototype, that proves that the thing exists and embodies the features and benefits that you think it does, is all you need to do.

 

“You build a prototype that captures the essence of what you have in a way that you can scale it. You’ve solved all of the technical challenges, maybe the software isn’t perfect but you know the software issues can be solved, and you have all the major components and you don’t have to invent something that doesn’t exist and you know that you have a system that fundamentally works and stop at that point, because investors, they understand the rest of it.

 

“I was surprised at first because I’d go into a presentation and I would start talking about the product and how awesome it is and all the technical part and they’d say, ‘we don’t care about that, we get it, we get the one-wheeled thing and you’re an engineer and we believe you can build it, now tell us how we’re going to make money?'

 

“A, you’re building stuff but B, when you’ve built your first prototype, put it in front o...

 

“To go to the next level, you have to switch into a completely different mindset … or find other people who can play that role … and you have to build a plan with real sales numbers and real dealer channel information and show how your idea will actually make money.

 

“Another thing is that when you go in to talk to investors, don’t go there trying to sound like you know all the answers. The more you sound like you are flexible and open to discovering what’s going to happen and that there’s enough money in the budget if things aren’t going to plan that you can and will pivot and do it differently, investors actually like that.

 

“Investors like the fact that you’re trainable, that you’re aware, that your ego is not tied to your ideas, that you know you’re managing a business, and that you have a process. Investors are more interested in that you are aware there is a process to get there, as opposed to always knowing what the right answer is.

 

“It’s been a really interesting journey of being open and transparent and saying, ‘I’m not perfect and I don’t have all the right answers straight up, but I have developed a process and a timeline and a budget on how to get there and that’s what I’m selling. I’m selling an opportunity, I’m selling a journey.’

 

“I’m selling finding out the answer to this question and if the answer is yes, then we all make a pot of money and if the answer is no, then we fall into the nine out of ten companies that fail. It’s up to you to decide if this company is worth investing in, and my job is to reduce the risk that you’re trying to come to grips with.

 

Gizmag: What advice would you give to inventors out there?

 

“A, you’re building stuff but B, when you’ve built your first prototype, put it in front of people who know, and if they think it can fly, you need to turn into a businessman pretty quick.

 

“Another bit of advice I’d give to inventors is that when an inventor embarks on a journey, there’s a certain amount of letting go. You almost have to be ready to let go, to be ready to give yourself to the process and the process is not so much willing and forcing something to happen, it’s about reducing the obstacles for something to show up, for good things to happen.

 

“So my job as a company leader is how to reduce the chances of failure or reduce the chances that something bad can happen, because I can’t always control the good things that are going to happen quite as much. It’s becoming emotionally unattached.

 

“If you get too emotionally attached to what’s going to happen tomorrow you’ll give yourself an ulcer or a heart attack. So for me, it’s 'how am I going to show up today?' and 'am I going to do the best job I can and stick to the plan?' You must always have a plan in play. I don’t necessarily know where the road is going but I need to stick between the guardrails.

 

"If you have a destination, it doesn’t matter so much how far your headlights reach into the future, just don’t rub against the guard rails for too long. You have to stay as close to the middle of the road as you can so you can feel the momentum growing, and the growth and journey progressing. If it’s not fun any more, it’s because you don’t see it as a journey, and how you’re going to evolve as a person, and effectively learn the lessons that present themselves, and the lessons that you’re going to help the people around you learn. Why are the people around you there? What’s their motivation? Why are we all working so hard on this?"

 

Gizmag: Where does the journey lead from here?

 

“We’re within a few months of shipping the bike which we showed to the market, the one that’s on our web site and in the videos and what the public has seen, so that’s pretty exciting. In the space of one year, we’ve taken the lessons learned from three prototypes and baked them into a product that’s pretty bad-ass.

 

“What we’re now doing is being very strategic and careful about how we scale the business, how we roll it out, the level of noise we’re creating that we need to support with the resources we have and developing a global strategy on how we would duplicate manufacturing in different geographical areas around the world and how we’ll have different types of distribution in different countries and how it will be supported.

 

The Ryno is designed to resemble a conventional motorcycle in its controls and riding posi...

 

“We are getting a lot of interest from around the world from different companies that want to license and manufacture the Ryno – from places like India and Brazil, or companies that want to distribute the product. It really has been an amazing reaction globally. So we’re looking at all the different ways we can service different countries and allow people to adopt this new and quite unique form of urban transport. If companies are interested in becoming part of the ecosystem we’re building, they should contact us soon, while the strategies are being decided.

 

“We’re orchestrating a staged global roll out and distributed production is the strategy, without manufacturing and distributing it all from one place in Portland, Oregon. So we’re being very careful, taking our time to ensure the brand is really clean. It’s more of a bigger chess game right now, rather than making a lot of money as fast as we can selling product in the short term, we’re continually adding long term value to the company by moving slowly but strategically instead.'

 

The Ryno has a top speed of around 10 mph. It comes with two operational settings, “beginn...

 

Gizmag: Why are you doing this?

 

“I’ve been with my software guy, Tony O, for quite a few years now and one night we were sitting there really frustrated with a problem and I turned to him and said, 'why the hell are we doing this?' and he stopped and disconnected from the problem for a moment, thought about it, and said, 'because no-one else is doing this, and if we can make this thing do what we think it’s gonna do, that’s pretty awesome, and I’d much rather be doing this than working as a lab rat in some company.'

 

"He said, ‘Man, I’m in the game.’ Courtesy : GIZMAG

 

Now convert any bicycle into a electric bicycle with no modifications : New concept

 

A team of London-based engineers has come up with anew electric assist concept that mounts a motor to any bikes seatpost, which in turn drives the rear wheel.

 

Dubbed the Rubbee, the patent pending system will power a bike for over 15 miles on a two-hour charge. The creator's main selling point revolves around the ability to turn any bike into an electric driven bicycle in a matter of seconds, minus the need to make any adjustments to the bike itself. The system is throttle operated

Click to watch the video

Introducing Rubbee, a new electric bike conversion concept

 

Weight is also another unique selling point for the Rubbee, which comes in at 6.5 kilograms, around half the weight of many other conversion kits on the market.

 

The flywheel that drives the rear wheel is made from a specifically developed polyurethane formula, designed to efficiently move the bicycle forwards, but without wearing the rear tyre down too much. The battery is good for 200 charge cycles, apparently without any drop off in performance toward the end of its life. more....

 

Electric scooter that can carry goods as well!!: futuristic

Electric scooters aren't new, by any means, but an electric scooter that can carry you and your gear, cleanly and quickly, certainly could be a new and innovative way to get around the city.And if the latest project from Lit Motors gets fully funded (as it seems to be well on track to be), we may be seeing these two-wheeled mini-trucks scooting around town in the near future.

Lit Motors has been making waves in electric transportation options with theirself-balancing, enclosed motorcycle, but that might be too much vehicle (and at too high of a cost) for many people who want a smaller option for a quiet, clean, and cheap to operate, personal vehicle.

kubo electric scooter from Lit Motors

The company's kubo scooter, however, might be the perfect option for hauling not just ourselves around, but also all of our gear or groceries, without having to fit it all in a backpack.

Designed and built as a side project, the idea for the kubo came about because they "couldn't find a good quality electric scooter anywhere". This 100% electric scooter looks a bit odd, when compared to traditional moped and scooter designs, but that's because it's made specifically to haul more than just a person. The 22" square cargo area within the frame of the scooter has loops, hooks, and rails to secure your gear while in transport, and the kubo can handle up to 300 lb (rider's weight plus the cargo).

kubo has a top speed of 45 mph, and a range of 50 miles per full charge. The onboard charger can be plugged into any standard outlet and is said to charge the scooter "in a few hours".more..

Electric Cargo bicycle : amazing use

The FEDDZ is designed to carry all kinds of cargo for work and play

As always, autos were the main focus of this year's Geneva Motor Show, but a smaller category of vehicle made its presence felt. Electric bikes and scooters, such as the Kia Electric Bicycle and Qoros eBIQE, had a strong showing. A third interesting design we found in the halls of the Palexpo, the FEDDZ strikes a balance between electric cargo bike and motor scooter.

 

 

 

 

 

There are a number of electric cargo bikes on the market, but many of them are large, cumbersome affairs that seem to place "cargo" well ahead of "bike." The FEDDZ is a slimmer, more streamlined design that does away with the extended front beds and buckets inherent in other designs, like the 2x4 cargo bike and Urban Arrow. It won't shuttle your children downtown or haul a chest of treasure home from the sea, but it packs enough room for many common items.

 

The FEDZZ's hollow center provides room for the battery and cargo

 

Germany's Emo-Bike took a look at the typical motorcycle and realized it could free up a lot of storage space by removing the gas tank. The use of an electric hub motor allowed it to pull out not only the gas tank, but also the bulky, centrally mounted gas drivetrain, while returning only a flat battery pack. That opens up 23 liters of cargo space in the heart of the FEDDZ frame, space enough for things like a motorcycle helmet; a gym bag; or a football, jersey, cleats and a water bottle, as Emo tells it. The cargo section includes two belts to secure the goods for the ride.

 

The 48-volt lithium-ion battery is integrated into the lower rear section of the central cargo area. It is easily unlocked, removed and carried via a fold-out handle, allowing riders the ability to charge it in a home or office. Two battery options are available to FEDDZ buyers: a 1,600-Wh ECO battery that offers up to 43.5 miles (70 km) of range on a charge and a 2,100-Wh Premium battery that spins the wheels for up to 68 miles (110 km). The ECO battery takes 5.5 hours to charge, and the Premium takes 7 hours. Both are guaranteed for 500 recharging cycles.

 

The battery unlocks and removes for charging and storage

 

With its diamond-frame and mountain bike-like Manitou suspension fork, the FEDDZ could easily be mistaken for an electric bicycle. However, it lacks a pedal drivetrain and is classified as an electric motor scooter. The handlebar-mounted drive switch lets the rider control the rear hub motor's output through three modes, which free up to 15.5 mph (25 km/h) or 28 mph (45 km/h) worth of speed, depending upon model. A central display shows key info like speed, battery life and driving range. The battery also powers a Philips front-rear lighting system, and a USB port allows the rider to tap into it to charge his or her smartphone.

 

The FEDDZ has an aluminum frame with a 1,320-mm wheelbase. It weighs 73 lb (33 kg) before the 25-lb (11.5-kg) battery gets locked into place. Components include the Manitou suspension fork, which offers up to 80 mm (3.1 in) of travel, Magura hydraulic disc brakes and 26-in Schwalbe Crazy Bob tires. Both the seat and handlebars adjust to fine-tune fit around the rider, and anodized footrests give idle feet a place to hang out.

 

The FEDDZ hit the market last year and is available for €5,990 euro for the 25 and 45 models with ECO batteries and €6,990 for models with Premium batteries (US$8,340 to $9,730). The 45 km/h models require a motor scooter or car driver's license in Emo-Bike's home country of Germany, while the 25 km/h models require only Mofa approval. They both require a helmet and insurance but do not need to be registered or inspected. Regulations will vary in other countries. more..


 

 

Stromer 2013 electric bicycles has a flaw??: recalled

The bicycle fork can break, posing a crash and injury hazard to the rider.

The company has received one report of a fork breaking, resulting in minor scrapes and bruises to the rider.

This recall involves all 2013 Stromer ST1 women’s and men’s pedal-assist electric bicycles, models M33 Elite and P48 Platinum. The bikes were sold in three colors; black, red and white. They have an integrated lithium battery located inside the down tube, motor on the rear hub and a three-button LCD system display on the handlebars. “Stromer” is printed on the top tube of the bicycle frame and on the seat and chain guard. The fork’s serial numbers for the recalled bikes start with: ST1S2F, ST1S2G, ST1S2H, ST1S2I, ST1S2J, ST1S3A, ST1S3B, ST1S3C, ST1S3D and ST1S3E. The serial number is etched at the bottom of the rear fork.

The bicycles, manufactured in Switzerland, were sold through authorized Stromer dealers nationwide and online from January 2012 to May 2013 for between $3,500 and $4,000.

Consumers should immediately stop riding the bicycle and take it to an authorized Stromer dealer. Consumers with a recalled bicycle will receive a free replacement fork and have it installed at no cost.

Consumers may contact BMC-USA at (800) 819-4262 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or by e-mail at andrew.gelles@bmc-switzerland.com.

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 *You need  a licence to drive a electric bicycle in india??


According to officials, there have been several accidents involving battery-operated two-wheelers and since one does not require to wear a helmet or possess a driving licence, it puts not only the rider but also other road users at risk.In some cases, the riders could not be traced and in the absence of mandatory insurance cover for other two-wheelers, the victims were also unable to claim any damages. 

Also, there have been violations which have come to the notice of the Transport department wherein the engines are above the permissible power limits under the Motor Vehicle Rules and the riders are not fulfilling the necessary conditions to ride such vehicles.A senior official of the Transport department said that there were at least half a dozen models of these two-wheelers available in the market, which operate on more than the mandatory 0.25 KW or 250 W power and without the models being registered with the Regional Transport Office (RTO) in gross violation of the Motor Vehicles Act. 
Consequently, even buyers do not check if the model has been approved by the RTO, as any vehicle operating on more than 250 W requires a registration as well as a valid driving licence.Under the stipulations, a battery-operated two-wheeler with an electric motor that has a power rating below 250W or an electric bike with a travelling speed is restricted to 25 to-35 kmph can be sold and operated on the roads without the need for a formal registration.

Users do not require a driving licence for using such a two-wheeler. However, one needs to check if the manufacturer has obtained a No-Objection Certificate from a testing/validating agency such as the Automotive Research Association of India.Suresh, a dealer in battery-operated vehicles, said: “Currently, the market for battery-operated two-wheelers is unregulated and many companies sell these two-wheelers by importing kits from China and assembling them in small workshops and thus violate the prescribed norms, as the battery-operated two-wheelers are almost outside the purview of the Motor Vehicles Act.”more..


 

*  Sizzling hot electric bicycle launched

 The KEB City has a step-through frame, rear-mounted battery, 28-inch wheels and mud-flaps

South Korean automotive manufacturer Kia looks set to return to its bicycle-manufacturing roots with the showing of two prototype electric bikes at the Geneva Motor Show. Already given a brand name – Kia Electric Bicycle (KEB) – both prototypes are of the "pedelec" variety, meaning they can be pedaled and powered electrically, with one a "City" and the other a Mountain Bike (MTB).

Kia's beginnings in 1944 were as a bicycle producer and it went on to become Korea's first mass producer of bicycles before growing into one of the world's largest automotive manufacturers. Fittingly, the two prototype KEBs were displayed alongside the company's first globally-available electric vehicle – the Soul EV. Also worth noting is that KEB's bikes will, should production be sanctioned, be manufactured in an innovative fashion.

The bikes originated from Kia’s Namyang Research & Development Centre in Korea, and use a monocoque metal frame that is manufactured by combining an advanced metal stamping technology and a robotic automated welding process.

The MTB has RockShox 100 mm front forks, 26-inch wheels, weighs 20 kg, an electric top spe...

Kia's new metal stamping technology is a production method specifically developed at the Namyang R&D Centre for manufacturing the KEB’s frame, an indication that production is inevitable. After pressing a metal sheet for each half of the frame, the two are welded together by an automated robotic welding process.

Kia claims a number of significant advantages for the robotic manufacturing process, including a greater choice of metals (metal stamping will allow the frame to be made from aluminum, high-tensile steel or stainless steel), "automotive standard" quality control, a less complex and cheaper manufacturing process, a greater degree of design freedom, and an array of surfacing details that can be added during the pressing of the metal frame.

Both models use the same drivetrain and power pack – a 250 watt hub motor and a 36 volt, 10 amp lithium-ion polymer battery pack which can be removed for charging, and recharged inside four hours from a domestic powerpoint.

Both also weigh around 20 kg (44 lb), have a top speed of 25 kph (15.5 mph), a 40 km (25 mile) range and brake and gear componentry from Shimano. Courtesy :gizmodo

The Electric Bicycle that can reach 40mph!!!??: speed just got redefined

Qoros has shown off a suitably futuristic electric bicycle at the Geneva Motor Show. The mountain bike styled machine, named eBiqe, uses a battery and motor, along with pedals, to achieve speeds of up to 40mph with a 75-mile range.

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This bike might be a concept but it's not the first time this type of machine has been built. You can buy the Stealth Electric Bike now if you've got £9,000 spare, and that will hit 50mph. But what makes the eBiqe special is its connecitivty - it's always on 3G.

 

The eBiqe features a 5-inch touchscreen display that's mounted to the handlebars. This will connect to the QorosQloud platform for advanced route planning, intelligent navigation, social networking and the ability to check the bike's tyre pressures, battery charge and range.

 

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The QorosCloud navigation currently found in Qoros cars has been adapted to suit cyclists. It still incorporates real-time incidents, travels times, weather and even charging points. The bike will charge to full in 80-minutes from a standard power outlet.

 

The eBiqe has three modes: Power for a top speed of 40mph and 50-mile range; Street for a legal limited 15mph with 75-mile range; and Eco for a speed of 37mph and 62-mile range. These will vary depending on how much the user pedals, as it can be ridden purely with electric drive. Range is also affected by how much the regenerative braking is used.

 

Qoros has not mentioned plans to release the eBiqe as it's just a concept right now. But if it were to hit the streets we'd expect a price of at least £5,000. But as a motorbike or car replacement, which doesn't require traditional fuel, that's not so bad. more...

 

*Electric bikes just got hotter:mind-blowing design

 

 

 

 

A typical electric bicycle tries to hide the motor inside. Some have clunky, bulky frames, and some, like the new Faraday Porteur, manage to disguise all of the gadgetry so the bike looks as much like a classic ride as possible. And then there are ideas like this one: The INgSOC concept bike looks nothing like any bike you’ve ever seen before.

 

The bike, originally designed a few years ago by Edward Kim, Benny Cemoli, and Stephan Mora, was never intended to be made. Kim compares it to a concept car that's not ready for the real world. Instead, it was meant to get people thinking. “It attempts to give a glimpse into the future of bicycle design and technology by choosing to let go of many aspects of practicality for the sake of expressing an idea,” he says.

Like some other electric bikes, the INgSOC gives a choice of modes. A removable battery pack behind the seat runs an electric motor. The rider can choose to sit back and let the bike do all the work, or switch to a mode that just helps make pedaling easier. Or--if someone wants to actually get some exercise--they can switch to pedal-only mode. As they ride, some of that energy will be captured to go back into the battery pack and power lights and a smartphone dock.more...

 

NEW Cargo storage electric bicycle

 

Bicycles built specifically to carry cargo, instead of just one person and what they can fit on an aftermarket bike rack or panniers, can open up a lot of options for wider use of bicycling for transportation for more people. And when you combine the load-carrying ability of a cargo bike with the option for electric pedal-assist, it not only allows for more flexibility for daily use, but also makes getting around with a full load of gear much easier on the body. Integrate a solar panel for charging, and you've got a potential game changer in green transportation.

 

As a family guy and former bike commuter, I can attest to the fact that getting the weekly groceries home on a bike was pretty challenging, and only after getting a bike cargo trailer (mine is a BOB Trailer) was I able to manage it without feeling like I was one of the Joads, but with a bicycle instead of a truck. During that time, I also knew many people that wouldn't use their bicycles for running errands because they not only had no space for it on their bikes, but also felt like they didn't have the energy or weren't fit enough to haul their stuff, even with a trailer. But if they had an electric cargo bike that would enable them to ride farther and faster, while carrying their gear with them, then those types of excuses wouldn't carry any water.

 

Electric cargo bikes aren't new, but the most recent release from NTS Works, the SunCycle, adds a twist, by integrating a renewable energy aspect to the bike with a 60W solar panel and charging system. The SunCycle is based on the company's LockerCycle, which has a locking cargo area and electric assist from its front hub motor, but with the solar panel, it's possible to also get a charge without plugging in.

 

"The NTS SunCycle integrates an incredibly small, lightweight and powerful solar panel. It weights about two pounds and is rated for 60 watts of power. We also make our own solar charge regulator that protects the battery from overcharging.

The noncrystalline solar cells used on our panels are over 19 percent efficient. Our panel is approximately 4 square feet." - NTS Source video


 

 

Japan’s Terra Motors unveils Rs. 18 lakh electric superbike

Terra Motors Corporation CEO & Founder Toru Tokushige unveiles the 1000 cc class Kiwami electric superbike in India, in New Delhi on Tuesday. Photo: Shanker Chakravarty

 

Japanese electric two wheeler maker Terra Motors Corporation on Tuesday unveiled an electric superbike, Kiwami, in India priced at Rs. 18 lakh (ex-showroom Delhi).

 

The company, which plans to start selling the bike in next couple of months, also plans to bring in a premium electric scooter, a range of affordable electric bikes and electric three wheelers into the Indian market.

 

“Besides, Kiwami, we plan to bring in a premium electric scooter and an electric three-wheeler this year. We will also consider launching affordable range electric bikes in the future,” Terra Motors Chief Executive Officer Toru Tokushige told reporters in New Delhi.

 

The Tokyo-headquartered firm, which will be importing the superbike initially into the country, is looking to garner 25 per cent market share in the Indian electric bike segment.

 

“We are targeting 25 per cent market share this year in the electric bike segment. We also plan to invest Rs 30 crore during the year,” Mr. Tokushige said.

 

The Indian electric bike market is estimated to be around 60,000 units per annum.

 

The 1000cc Kiwami can cover a distance of 200 km with a single charge and achieve a top speed of 140 km/hr.

 

Terra Motors, which sold 20,000 electric vehicles in Japan last year, is also in the process of finalising dealer partners in India.

 

“With immense knowledge of electric vehicles, we will associate ourselves with the dealers who are well experienced in service quality,” Mr. Tokushige said.

 

Terming India as an important market, Mr. Tokushige said the company wants to be a front runner in the electric two-wheeler segment in the country.

 

“India is the second largest producer of two-wheelers in the world. Hence it is an important market in our strategic growth plan,” Mr. Tokushige said. source


 

 

INSURANCE FOR ELECTRIC BICYCLES!!!!

Can we have it in india??

E-bikes, bicycles with power assist provided by an electric motor activated by pedaling or a handlebar mounted power lever, are rapidly gaining popularity as an alternative to a 100% human pedal power bicycle. Until recently it was almost impossible to find a proper insurance policy to cover an e-bike for theft or damage and the rider for liability.

Image by Richard Masoner.  (PRNewsFoto/Velosurance)

E-bikes, bicycles with power assist provided by an electric motor activated by pedaling or a handlebar mounted power lever, are rapidly gaining popularity as an alternative to a 100% human pedal power bicycle. Until recently it was almost impossible to find a proper insurance policy to cover an e-bike for theft or damage and the rider for liability. Velosurance, a Fort Lauderdale, FL based bicycle insurance agency that launched a bicycle-specific insurance policy in 2012 now has extended this policy to cover electric-assisted bicycles.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20131210/MN31076)

The addition of electric power assist to bicycles will extend the distance riders can travel and encourage more use of the e-bike as a viable alternative to making short around town trips in a car. Because an e-bike with a 750 watt (or less) motor is still considered a bicycle, e-bike excursions will not be restricted into areas that ban motorized vehicles, such as natural areas and cross country trails.

 

Recognizing the emerging market of electric-assist bicycles, Velosurance partnered with an A-rated U.S. insurance company to offer an e-bike insurance product with one goal in mind – to allow clients to create insurance policies that would protect the bicycles they ride.  

 

Electric-assist bicycles look very similar to normal bikes: they have pedals and two wheels. E-bikes are great  for commuting around town or scooting off road. What makes them special is that when the rider needs a little help climbing a hill, additional power is available. The electric motor allows the rider to cruise along with less effort and up to 30 miles before recharging. Unlike other electric vehicles that require special charging stations, electric-assist bicycles charge quickly from a normal household outlet.

 

The e-bike revolution has already taken hold in Europe: bike shops in Western Europe and the UK carry a variety of electric bikes and several U.S. based manufacturers are jumping onboard as well. Most notably, Specialized released the Specialized Turbo, a high-end e-bike fit for the urban cyclist with a 250 watt motor. Other bike manufacturers such as a Felt and Niner are following suit. Trek has 3 e-bikes in their 2014 lineup.

"There are over 15 million bicycles sold each year in the U.S., of which 4 million bicycles are of higher value and sold through specialty bicycle shops. Electric-assist bicycles are readily available at bicycle retail shops and the popularity of electric-assist bicycles is becoming a booming segment of the bicycle industry," said Dave Williams, CEO and co-founder of Velosurance. "A good quality entry-level e-bike costs upwards of $1,000 and an average value of $3,000, with high-end e-bicycles costing as much as $12,000. Until Velosurance, cyclists had very limited options to protect their bicycles with adequate insurance coverage."

 

Each policy is customized by the client and can include coverage protection on the e-bike for damage caused by theft, crash, collision, fire, attempted theft, vandalism or hitting another object.  In addition, coverage of spare parts, cycle apparel, and rental reimbursement are included at no additional cost.

 

Optional coverage includes: Liability coverage to cover the rider in case of injuries or property damage caused by the insured cyclist; Medical Payments to cover medical costs of the policyholder associated with a cycling accident; and Vehicle Contact Protection for medical costs associated with accidents caused by an automobile. Additionally, Roadside Assistance is available, providing the cyclist a service vehicle ride of up to 35 miles.

 

Williams added, "In most cases, homeowner or renter's insurance will not cover e-bikes for theft, damage, or liability because the bike has a motor and auto insurance companies will not offer e-bike insurance because e-bikes under 750 watts are not required to be registered, and e-bike riders do not need to be licensed. This is where Velosurance steps in with a stand-alone e-bike insurance policy that insures e-bikes with power assist up to 750 watts, and covers just about anything accidental that can happen."

 

To enhance their e-bike policy service, Velosurance partnered with local bicycle shops nationwide to provide repair or replacement services to Velosurance policy holders. According to Williams, "No matter where our client is riding, there will be a Velosurance Trusted Partner bicycle shop nearby".

 

E-bike policies start at $100 per year and offer a variety of coverage levels and deductible options.

 

Velosurance Electric Bicycle Insurance provides policies in the following states: AlabamaArkansasArizonaCalifornia,ColoradoConnecticutFloridaGeorgiaIowaIdahoIllinoisIndianaKentuckyLouisianaMassachusettsMaryland,MichiganMinnesotaMissouriNorth CarolinaNew HampshireNew JerseyNew MexicoNew YorkOhioOklahomaOregon,PennsylvaniaSouth CarolinaTennesseeTexasUtahVirginiaWashington, and Wisconsin. COURTESY

ONE- WHEELED ELECTRIC BIKE : TRUE INNOVATION!!!

RYNO market photo.jpg

The owner of Beaverton-based RYNO Motors says his offbeat electric vehicle resonates with people because it “looks like the future.”

The RYNO consists of a lightweight frame set atop a single wheel powered by an electric motor. It can go up to 10 mph and travels about 10 miles on one fill of its rechargeable battery.

For a $150 refundable deposit, RYNO Motors is now offering customers the chance to get in line for the $5,295 microcylce, advertised as a transitional vehicle that can traverse sidewalks or bike lanes. The company started accepting preorders on Dec. 4, and the first production run of RYNOs will be in early 2014

The Beaverton Leader sat down with Chris Hoffmann, the owner of RYNO Motors and mastermind behind the distinctive cycle. Here’s what Hoffmann had to say:

On the inspiration behind the RYNO

Hoffmann was fishing with his then-13-year-old daughter about seven years ago.

“She said, ‘Daddy, I saw this one-wheeled motorcycle in a video game. Could you actually build that?’”

Hoffman thought he probably could.

He has no formal engineering degree but worked in design, engineering and invention in Detroit, Michigan, before moving himself and his inventing career to Portland in 1996.

“It’s been a long journey for me from getting doughnuts and running blueprints. That was in 1976 that I got my first engineering job … But for me, engineering was always about figuring out how to make it my own.”

On the product name

The name RYNO, like the design, stemmed from a video game Hoffmann’s daughter played,“Ratchet & Clank.” The toughest weapon in the game is the R.Y.N.O. Hoffmann says the acronym for his product is open for interpretation – he usually goes with Ride Your New Opportunity. 

On the challenges in creating the RYNO

“I’ve learned a lot as an entrepreneur. I think the biggest take-away is what not to do.”

Hoffmann’s first attempt at building a one-wheeled electric vehicle failed.

“I cooked it up with some circuit boards and the motor, and literally fire came out of it. And I thought, ‘OK, this is the part I don’t know how to do.’”

He found software engineer Tony Ozrelic, who managed to pull together Hoffmann’s work and his own to create a system that didn’t burst into flames.

“So we got together and we built something and we got on that thing, and it was impossible to ride.”

The vehicle wouldn’t steer and went little more than 10 feet before the rider lost control. 

On overcoming those challenges

“There were as many crazy ideas as you can think of to get this going. And then I realized this thing has to be dead simple.”

Hoffmann decided to put a basic bicycle-like steering system in place, though he wasn’t sure how it would work with only one wheel. He and Ozrelic gave themselves a month to build something. If it didn’t work this time, they’d give up the project.

They put a relatively moveable frame over a thick single wheel, one that would allow the seat and handlebars to move naturally with the rider’s body so he or she wouldn’t lose control.

“I was dumbfounded by how easy it was to ride, and then I though, ‘Now what?’ It started out as an idea for my daughter, and it wasn’t until I was riding this around town that I realized what it was.”

 

SOLAR JUNK BICYCLE!!

 

Take 13 college students from diverse backgrounds, ask them to build something purposeful out of junk and voila! — the result is a pair of funky three-wheeled bikes, powered by renewable energy, that transport people and cargo anytime, anyplace.

 

The band of students at Macomb Community College collaborated for 14 weeks on the “trikes,” which run on a combination of pedal power and an electric hub motor using a battery charged with solar power.

 

The students, who are earning certificates in Macomb’s renewable energy technology program, kept the designs environmentally friendly by incorporating the “reduce, reuse, recycle” mantra of the sustainability movement.

 

Frames are made of discarded steel. Moving parts come from old bicycles, garden equipment and other sources. The battery pack for one of the trikes comes from a delivery truck. The goal was to keep the purchase of new components to a minimum.

 

Lisa A. Richter, a professor of engineering technology at MCC who worked for Ford Motor Co., said her team of students — four women and nine men ranging from a 20-year-old bike tech to a 60-year-old automotive mechanic — amazed her with their ability to bring their special talents to the project.

 

Most are working to earn the renewable energy certificate as a complement to an associate degree in another field. Each student brings a much-needed skill set to the task, such as project management, power systems engineering, automotive mechanics, advanced engineering or design. COURTESY



 

 Stevenson High School's Bareq Ibrahaam, left, and Shayan Waseem take a spin Macomb Community College in Warren last week.

 

SUPERPEDESTRIAN STARTS SELLING ELECTRIC BIKE KITS : MIT : $ 699

Do you like the idea of riding your bike to work, but don't want to arrive drenched in sweat? If so, a Cambridge-based startup has an answer for you: an easy-to-install hybrid motor that gives your bike extra power for moving faster on long trips, and making it easier for you to ride up hills. 

The startup, Superpedestrian, is selling the product online — dubbed the "Copenhagen Wheel" — for $699, and will start shipping in the first quarter of 2014. Users ride the Wheel like a normal bicycle; as they pedal, and the motor phases in and out. 

By learning about the user and analyzing the upcoming topography, the Wheel determines how much support the user needs. Moreover, the Wheel locks the bike when the rider walks away, and unlocks it when she returns. Riders can remove and carry its rechargeable battery. 

As CEO Assaf Biderman explained in a November 27 interview, the Copenhagen Wheel is "a self-contained unit that snaps easily onto the back of any ordinary bicycle and turns it into an electric hybrid. With extra power at the riders' feet, regenerative braking and advanced control systems, the wheel promotes cycling, so that long distances or steep up-hills are no longer a barrier to a comfortable ride." 

The technology behind the product was refined in a project that MIT's SENSEable City Laboratory did for the city of Copenhagen. Mr. Biderman was the lab's associate director before he moved to Superpedestrian as CEO and a part-time role at SENSEable City. more.. source 2

*ELECTRIC BICYCLES IN CHINA ARE INCREASING AT A RATE OF 15% PER YEAR

 India will follow suit soon !!?

There are about 160 million electric bicycles in China.The numbers are increasing at a rate of 15 percent a year.The growing number of electric bicycles on the road has also increased the fatality rate.

Last year alone, more than 5-thousand people were killed riding an electric bicycle.

Li Rong, director of the World Health Organization's road safety project in China, says the high accident rate is due partly because riders don't know how to ride the electric bicycles properly.

"Some of the electric bike riders don't obey traffic rules. Speeding, carrying passengers, going in wrong directions, running red lights, and making phone calls while riding are five dangerous behaviors, among which speeding is the most common in China. Many of the electric bike riders are not familiar with traffic rules and they don't wear helmets while driving. "

National regulations are supposed to cap the speed limit for electric bicycles at 20 kilometers per hour.

However, high-power bicycles can reach 40 or even 60 kilometers per hour.

Brant Powis, advisor to the WHO road safety project, says in most developed countries, electric bicycles are more of a recreational tool.

Here in China, electric bicycles are mainly considered an environmentally-friendly transportation tool.

"In Europe, the primary focus is on what may see behind this. I guess it's in a smaller version: light-weight, particularly using light-weight batteries and having a very low potential speed. And it's used often for recreational purposes. It's used in many big cities for the particularly aged. This is a big advantage for an aging population throughout the world. In many cities, bicycles are used by older people."

Proponents of electric bicycles contend they reduce air and noise pollution, as well as increase city traffic efficiency. 
But Li Rong says more regulations are still needed to ensure people's safety.more..

 

 

 

*BANGLORE BASED E SCOOTER MAKER TO RAISE RS 30 CRORE FROM PRIVATE EQUITY FIRMS

Bangalore-based  plans to raise Rs 30 crore ($5 million) from  firms or impact investors to fuel its expansion. Impact investors want to make a social impact with reasonable returns.

The company, which claims to have developed India's first  that gives a mileage of 100 km with a single charge, will invest Rs 18 crore to set up an integrated plant to manufacture motors, controllers, ABS plastic parts and other accessories required to assemble electric scooters.more..

 

 

 

 

SOLAR E BIKE DO IT YOURSELF!!

 

This project was a way of using the ongoing power I am producing both from my 100w wind generator and 5w solar panel.

The basis of the project was a second hand Sinclair Zeta II bought on eBay for �21 ($40) - originally manufactured from 1997 - 2000

The Sinclair ZETA II consists of a rechargeable battery pack, which powers a lightweight motor unit over the front wheel. Touch a lever, and the unit pivots to bring a pulley-mounted belt into contact with the tyre. Press a switch, and the belt drives the wheel. This belt system is patented by Sir Clive Sinclair. When you no longer need power assistance, a flick of the handlebar switch takes the belt out of contact with the tyre.

Specifications

 Battery 12v 7Ah Yuasa sealed lead acid.

Motor 12v dc - 168 W max (thermal cut-out)

Charge time 14 hrs@ 500Ma

Max speed 11mph

Range Approx 5 miles on level road - no headwind.

 

        

Handlebar motor controls.                                                           12v 7ah battery and fuse.

        

Zeta motor disconnected from tyre.                                                               Zeta motor engaged.

  

The addition of my 12v 500Ma (5w) solar panel with a 1 amp inline fuse connected was all that was needed to charge my bikes battery.

A silicone blocking diode connected to the positive terminal of the solar panel is necessary to stop reverse current from the battery.

If on a cloudy day I need more charging power I hook the battery to my 100w wind generators battery through a controller box to limit the current

to 1.5 amps and that takes 4.5 hours to fully charge from flat. I check the voltage regularly with my digital multimeter, a charging regulator could be

used if the bike is left for long periods of time in sunshine, they are available from maplin electronics price �9.99 code N82AU  wiring examplehere

I use it daily to travel the 2 miles to work, however as expected the power from such a small motor is not great, best not to rely on the units power solely.

Best to consider it as pedal assistance, it really helps the old legs. I have read the zeta 3 (again no longer made) had a more powerful motor and quieter gear train.

 

                                                                                                    

 

 

SOLAR E- BIKE WITHOUT BATTERIES : INNOVATION 

 

 SolarCross e-bike with solar panels photo

An electric bicycle powered by solar panels that are on the bike rather than by a battery. Now that's something I haven't seen before! This is more a "cool project, but not quite practical yet" rather than "this will be mass-market soon", but that's ok. We always learn more by trying things that seem a bit crazy at first!

 

Terry Hope is the DIYer behind this project, which he calls the Solar-Cross ebike.more...

 

A SOLAR BICYCLE THAT RUNS AS AN E BIKE TOO! DEVELOPED IN INDIA!:LATEST INNOVATION

 

 

A young engineer from the city has developed first of its kind cycle that runs onsolar power and also works as electric bike.With small solar panels installed on a normal cycle, this solar cycle is a zero energy model. After receiving success from its first working model, Abhishek Avrani (29), who had developed the cycle for a school project, plans to make it more affordable for commuters who want to champion the green cause.

"Like any conventional cycle you can pedal this one. If you don't want to pedal, it works like an electric bike," says Avrani, who has developed the solar cycle with a battery and an electric motor. "The battery mounted on the cycle gets charged through the small solar panels mounted on the shed of the cycle. There is an electric motor which enables this cycle to work like an electric bike," says Avrani, an engineering graduate from Vallabh Vidyanagar-based Sardar Patel University, who set up a start-up in 2008 which works on solar based projects. "Advantage of this solar cycle in comparison to electric bike is that you have to leave the electric bike wherever you are once the battery gets discharged. In case of this solar cycle, all you need is to keep it in front of sun shine to charge the battery. Within half-an-hour, it gets sufficient charging to drive for another ten kilometers," he says. According to Avrani, the battery of the solar cycle developed by him gets sufficient charge in two hours to run nearly 25 kilometres.

"A commuter does not need to hunt for electric points in order to charge the battery. All he or she needs to do is park the cycle at any place where it gets sufficient exposure to sunlight," says Avrani. He has developed the working model of the solar cycle equipped with speedometer and LED lights which work on lower power input.

While the youngster has developed the first sample that costs Rs 28,000, he is making more changes to the model to make it cheaper and aesthetically appealing to commuters.

"It is already a light-weighted model, but I am modifying it so that it finds greater acceptance among commuters," he adds.

more....

 

A NEW CONCEPT OF ELECTRIC BICYCLES

 

The launching of the ALTER BIKE, a new concept of electric bicycles which relieves the user from most of the usual constraints of electric mobility: No plug-in infrastructure for charging is necessary, lighter weight and range availability on demand.

 

Presented on the 30th of May 2013, at the 20th Congress of “Le club des Villes et Territoires Cyclables” in Nice, ALTER BIKE is a real revolutionary innovation in electric bicycles. A partnership of three French firms – Cycleurope, Pragma Industries and Ventec – have developed this new bicycle concept with the target of being a highly ecological and economical means of powered transport.more..

 

A PEDAL ASSIST UNIT THAT CAN CONVERT ANY BIKE TO ELECTRIC BIKE

 

It could be possible in the near future to arrive to class looking just as good as when you left, not like you just biked two miles. FlyKly has recently unveiled their prototype for Smart Wheel, a pedal assist unit that can transform almost any bike into an electric bike. For a community like Davis, where biking is not just a form of transportation but a lifestyle, Smart Wheel and its mobile phone app are an exciting development.

 

The 9-pound Smart Wheel contains the motor, battery and electronics inside a unit that is affixed to a 29-inch rear wheel. It can replace almost any bike’s rear wheel and is simple to swap in and out. Smart Wheel’s motor turns on when you start pedaling to assist you in your journey. It can help you reach speeds of up to 20 miles per hour and can travel up to 30 miles on a single charge. It will come in a variety of colors to suit bike frames and customer preferences.more,,

 

 TOP 5 E BIKE COMPANIES IN INDIA

 

Leading Electric Bike Companies in India

 

  • Heroelectric
  • BPG
  • Bsa  motors
  • TVS
  • EKO

 

BUILD YOUR OWN E BIKE FOR 25% OF THE COST OF AN OFF THE SHELF BIKE

 

What if you could easily build your own electric bike for less than an annual car payment? What if you could be zipping around town on two wheels, passing cars in traffic and spending only pennies on electricity to do it?
Well it's easier than you think! This is the only guide you'll ever need to teach you all the basics of building your own electric bike that can take you anywhere you need to go. Electric bikes are one of the best ways to get around and are much faster and cheaper than being stuck in traffic in your car. It's time to turn your boring commute into an exhilirating electric-powered joyride! source

 

5 APPEALING FACTORS ABOUT E-BIKES!!!

1) Converting a bike to an e-bike is slightly more common than buying an e-bike from scratch.

2) E-Bike conversions are usually cheaper than purchases, but not always. 

3) E-bike trips seem especially good at replacing car trips. 

4) E-bikes turn people into daily riders.

5) The biggest complaint with e-bikes is their weight SOURCE

CYBERABAD GOES CYCLE CRAZY ???CYCLEABAD?!!

IT IS A GREAT INITIATIVE!!!

Employees of MNC companies usually complain that they are so strapped with work that they don't have time for exercise. Or that cycling is tough on our roads, or some such. But now, all these excuses can be thrown out of the window as a state-of-art bike station has been inaugurated at Gachibowli.
Around 1,000 commuters, from youngsters to elderly persons, participated in Bicyclon 2013 MORE..

 

 BMW E-BIKE 2014 LAUNCHED!!!!

BMW Cruise e-Bike 2014 is a “pedelec,” suggesting that, as you pedal, the Bosch electric motor also puts out 48 Newton meters of torque (35.4 pound-feet) to help you along. The added momentum comes with any tiny amount of action. This is a BMW — good to remember if you are leaving a position of inactivity. Once you start any push towards movement again, equip yourself for a quick engagement with accelerated spring.MORE..

bmw ebike

Read more at http://cleantechnica.com/2013/10/24/bmw-electric-bike-bmw-cruise-e-bike-2014/#OTzcefJ8om4T3Dce.99

 

BMW Cruise e-Bike 2014 is a “pedelec,” suggesting that, as you pedal, the Bosch electric motor also puts out 48 Newton meters of torque (35.4 pound-feet) to help you along. The added momentum comes with any tiny amount of action. This is a BMW — good to remember if you are leaving a position of inactivity. Once you start any push towards movement again, equip yourself for a quick engagement with accelerated spring.
Read more at http://cleantechnica.com/2013/10/24/bmw-electric-bike-bmw-cruise-e-bike-2014/#OTzcefJ8om4T3Dce.99

bmw logo

bosch

*SOLAR SCOOTERS REVEALED IN THUNDER BAY!!!29 OCTOBER 2013

 

A Thunder Bay company has imported two solar-powered scooters — but there's some uncertainty over where riders can legally use them.

 

The Highway Traffic Act forbids light motorized scooters or “go-peds” on roads, but Solar Logix spokesperson Jason Ritchat said a police officer told him there would be no issue.MORE..

 

 

BOSCH REVEALS SOLAE E-BIKE!!!!!!!!!!!!28 october 2013

Debuting the Bosch system to U.S. consumers for the first time, four bike companies are offering e-bike demos at the Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon at Irvine’s Great Park in southern California. The event opened last Thursday and closed Sunday. A second public session will run from this Thursday through Sunday

 

http://www.bicycleretailer.com/sites/default/files/images/article/The aptley named Haibike Super Race flat-bar road bike is a departure from the company's mountain line.jpg

 

more..

 

 

Mercedes electric bicycle, VW electric bicycle,  BMW bicycle, Audi bicycle, Toyata electric bike, Honda step, etc etc

Mercedes Electric Bike




Smart Electric Bike

BMW Electric Bike 


Audi Electric Bike


VW Bik.e

Toyota / Yamaha Electric Bike





Honda Step




Lexus Electric Bike

Ford Electric Bike



Porsche Electric Bike


* An electric bicycle from Merecedes Benz
Daimler-Benz's motorized smart ebike will be available at your local smart store in July starting at $3,240. (Richard Russell photo)
Daimler-Benz's motorized smart ebike will be available at your local smart store in July starting at Rs 1, 80,000/-


The smart ebike is powered by a propulsion system developed and supplied by BionX of Aurora, Ontario where Dartmouth native and award-winning designer Matthew Finbow is the in-house industrial designer. (Richard Russell photo)
The smart ebike is powered by a propulsion system developed and supplied by BionX of Aurora, Ontario where Dartmouth native and award-winning designer Matthew Finbow is the in-house industrial designer. (Richard Russell photo)





 Glow in the dark solar bicycleThe frame's paint is solar-activated and requires one hour of sunlight for one hour plus of night-time glow. And for you hipsters out there, the bikes come equipped with a flip-flop rear hub that allows bicyclists to ride fixed or single speed source





A special mount on the handlebars allows you to integrate your Smartphone with the ebike through an app, which automatically activates the electric drive system and becomes a control and information centre advising of everything from route information to battery status, average and current speed. (Richard Russell photo)
A special mount on the handlebars allows you to integrate your Smartphone with the ebike through an app, which automatically activates the electric drive system and becomes a control and information centre advising of everything from route information to battery status, average and current speed. (Richard Russell photo)

The smart ebike is an award-winning design enclosing , housing more high tech stuff than your average small car. Designed and developed by smart, it is being built by noted cycle-maker Grace in this city of 3.5 million people. Not only is it the capital of Germany, it is bicycle crazy! I had the opportunity to drive a smart ebike over a kilometre route that crossed the Spree River twice and ran alongside the famous Berlin Wall for more than a kilometre.  

The smart ebike is pedal-powered bicycle with electric assist, powered by a propulsion system developed and supplied by BionX of Aurora, Ontario where Dartmouth native and award-winning designer Matthew Finbow is the in-house industrial designer. Finbow designed the BionX G2 control system which became popular with a number of electric bicycle manufacturers before being selected by smart.

The sleek pedelec (pedal electric cycle) looks like no other. There is a chunky heftiness about it, sort of like a heavy duty mountain bike. But that sturdy, thick center portion houses the 39-volt/9.5 aH lithium ion battery pack which can be removed and charged from a household circuit in three to four hours.

There are Magura hydraulic disc brakes front and rear. Instead of a greasy chain connecting the pedals to the rear hub, you get high tech, toothed carbon belt. A large, thick, disk-like rear hub contains the 250-watt brushless electric BionX motor.  

Getting on the smart ebike is difficult for anyone with less than a 30-inch inseam, even with the seat in its lowest position. Centered atop the handlebars is the BionX control unit with four buttons flanking a small screen. The two on the right determine which of four levels of power assist you want from the electric motor while those on the left select the level of regenerative braking desired.

The right hand twist grip controls the three- speed shifter. The brake lever, the rear brake. The left side brake lever handles front wheel brake, duty but also the regenerative braking system at the rear hub. As you squeeze this lever you can instantly feel the retardation of that regenerative braking system, long before the brake itself is activated. The wheel hub motor becomes a generator when the brakes are applied, sending the recuperated energy to the battery.  You can see the amount of recharge activity on the control display as you slow. The switch on the bottom left of the controller allows the rider to use leg power to recharge the battery. Instead of taking power from the battery to run the electric motor and help propel the bike, it uses you physical input to recharge the battery. The most aggressive of these settings requires some serious physical work.  The experience is akin to riding a normal three-speed bike up a hill - successfully steeper hills as you go through the four levels available. It doesn’t take more than a second to see why they call that top setting the “workout” mode.

While the electric assist on most other pedelec bikes is controlled by a twist grip, the direct current motor on the smart ebike activates the moment you start to pedal.  Depending on the terrain, speed and amount of assist used, the ebike has a range of 30 – 90 kilometres on a full charge.

The electric motor will help you achieve speeds of up to 25 km/h. I did so repeatedly and effortlessly. As you pedal you add your leg power to that of the motor, powered by the lithium ion battery. That battery pack helps explain the ebike’s 22-kilogram heft, despite the use of aluminum and other weight-saving measures.

Want more technology? The front headlight is an LED unit with a daytime running light function. A special mount on the handlebars allows you to integrate your Smartphone with the ebike through a special app.  When mounted, the phone automatically activates the electric drive system and becomes a control and information centre advising of everything from route information to battery status, average and current speed. There is even a heart rate monitor included. You can also play your favourite tunes. source



Solar assisted trike

*CHANDIGARH TO GET SOLAR POWERED CYCLE STAND

After proposals to install solar power plants atop several buildings, the UT Administration has now decided to install solar-powered cycle stands in schools. The pilot project, for which a tender has been issued, will first be undertaken in Government High School, Sector 46 and be replicated in other schools if it is successful. The cycle stand, made of galvanised iron, will have a shed on which the solar panel would be installed.

 

The capacity of the power plant would be 15 kilo-watt power, while the cost of installing is expected to be around Rs 18 lakh. A tender for the same has been allotted.

 

Director (Environment), Santosh Kumar said, "Proposals were being sent by schools for construction of cycle stands with sheds in order to save cycles from the vagaries of weather. It was felt solar cycle stands would serve two purposes. Apart from the cycles being protected, power would be generated. We will replicate the model at other places if it proves successful."

 

With Chandigarh being declared a solar city, emphasis is being laid on installation of equipment to generate solar energy on government buildings. Such equipment is already installed at Model Jail, Paryavaran Bhawan and the Secretariat. Also, proposals have been prepared for several colleges and schools.

 

Officials claim this will reduce consumption of electricity to a certain extent, thus reducing bills.

 

Meanwhile, the approval for grid connectivity is awaited from the Centre. This would ensure excess power produced could be transferred to the grid, while in case of shortage it could be withdrawn.

 

The solar power plants are also being installed on government houses. Gradually, it will be replicated on private residence as well.

 

Santosh Kumar added the aim was to promote use of solar equipment among residents.MORE,,

 

He said efforts would be made to ensure the equipment was easily available to all. With increased accessibility, the prices would also reduce and demand for electricity would lessen.




*  
Helicopter bike conquers bad traffic, tall buildings
Helicopter bike conquers bad traffic, tall buildings

A Czechoslovakian design firm has joined forces with a Czechoslovakian light aircraft manufacturer and a Czechoslovakian bicycle company to make this flying Czechoslovakian bicycle electric helicopter thing.

If if weren't for the fact that this 200-pound bike is ridiculously giant and unwieldy, we might be sold on this idea. Theoretically, the FBike (it's called the "FBike") uses two main lift fans along with two side-mounted propellers to enable vertical take-offs and landings and three-axis control. It's all electric, but the battery system is minimal: expect just three to five minutes of flight time at 30 miles an hour.

This doesn't sound like a lot of airtime, but the idea is that you don't need a lot. The FBike is a bike that flies, not a helicopter that you can ride around (or, for that matter, ahoverbike). Short vertical hops have the potential to get you from place to place muchfaster by negating key obstacles. Traffic in the way? Fly over it. Tall building blocking your patch? Fly over it. Need to cross a river but all the bridges are clogged? Fly over it. Can't find a parking spot? Well, try the roof.  source

*

Marrs Cycles Brings Style 

Both stylish and green, this bespoke work of art packs a lithium battery that will power an average 175lb. rider 20mph across a range of 20 miles, and make sure they look good doing it.

What’s more, the frame, forks and handlebars of this 1920′s Harley meets beach cruiser bike are all handcrafted at their Southern California design studio. And like their Milwaukee based, gas powered counterparts, the guys art Marrs take serious pride in American-made craftsmanship.

The flagship M-1 is 36” tall from ground to handlebars, weighs 140lbs, fully charges in 7 hours, and comes painted or with gorgeous wood paneling.

marrs-cycle-bike-backmarrs-cycle-bike-frontmarrs-cycle-bike-side-view

Additionally, the bike features a 48V lithium battery, brushless DC rear hub motor, hydraulic disc brake, air cooled battery box, 3-piece crank case, as well as motorcycle quality wheels, tires, hubs, controls, seat, and grips.

Needless to say, this level of design, quality parts, and labor doesn’t exactly come cheap. The starting price to ride around on built-to-order luxury is a hefty $7,500.

Although they only offer the M-1 at this time, Co-Founder Brad Fanshaw told Gadizmo “we have others in the works.” Looks like I’ll be putting my name on yet another newsletter list!

Kaylad 2.0 electric tricycle concept

source  22/6/12

 

BMW's i Pedelec electric bike mates with its green i-series vehicles

Handy: BMW's i Pedelec fits in the boot of its i3 electric concept car and is powered by an electric motor which harvests power when going downhill

BMW has been trying to improve its green image lately with the i series of green concept vehicles. Apparently not satisfied with the greenness of its funky i3 electric, the car maker added a pair of folding electric bikes to the bargain.

 

i

 

BMW has paired its latest electric concept car with an even greener transport accessory - an electric bicycle which folds up into the boot.

The new BMW i Pedelec (Pedal Electric Cycle) Concept fits into a special slot in the boot of the German car giant's i3 electric hatchback.



BMW isn't the first luxury car company to get into cycling; Audi too has produced an electric, the Worthersee, and Audi and McLaren both produced rather striking traditional bikes in partnership with existing bike manufacturers. source

Top 10 Purpose Built Electric Bikes

23/6/12


* Biking on a Sunny Day
 The sun on your face, the wind blowing in your hair and you on a solar powered electric bike is the complete recipe for a blissful journey.

The electric- motor bicycle uses a battery that is recharged in a solar powered recharger.

 The bike had limited top speed of 25kmh and had a range of 100km.

 

*Frustrated over the fuel price hike and frequent power cuts, two college students have designed a solar bike in Madurai which runs a handsome 30 km when fully charged.

O K Karthick, doing his first-year MBA and K Harish Kumar, a final-year mechanical engineering student from KNL Engineering College, have come out with a design comparable to e-bikes. "E-bikes are a good option when petrol prices are soaring, but where do we go for electricity in this scenario," Karthick says.

The idea struck him one month ago, when one of his professors brought a solar mobile phone charger. "As an MBA student, I thought that this could become a business model when there is a severe power crunch," he said. Along with his friend Harish, he started researching the topic. The boys decided to use all scrap and hence fished in items such as a bike chase, shock absorbers and seats from the Sunday market. The solar panels cost them more since they could not find many dealers in such items. They shelled out Rs 6,000 each for a panel. But they are optimistic such panels will be cheap in cities like Bangalore and Coimbatore and decided to procure them from these places for their next venture, they said.

They have fixed four 20 watts solar panels with one at the front and the other three in the rear. Out of the three, two can be foldable while riding, thus not hindering navigation in crowded traffic. When parked, the solar panels can be unfolded to receive maximum sunlight. The photovoltaic cells in the panels create energy and save it in the batteries, fixed in the bike, which powers the motor attached in the rear wheel like normal e-bikes. "When charged for six hours in daylight, the bike runs for 30 km. During rainy days, the bike can be charged with normal electricity," Karthick said.

Another novel idea the boys struck upon was to use old dynamos found in bicycles to power the head lights. "The two dynamos attached to the front wheel power the headlights at night and during day, the minimum power they generate will be sent to the batteries," Karthick said. "In fact, finding dynamos was a tough task since they are almost obsolete. We found two of them in a village after a lot of searching," Harish said.

 

source

 

Solar powered bikes will catch on once the states provide the necessary infrastructure, solar powered docking stations 

Many states are organising bike sharing programmes.

The Maryland Department of Transportation has granted Montgomery County’s Department of Transportation $1.008 million for a proposed bikeshare program in the downcounty areas of Friendship Heights, Bethesda, Medical Center, Takoma Park and Silver Spring.

Bikesharing provides short-term bicycle rentals at self-service, automated, solar-powered docking stations in publicly accessible locations and is considered ideal for trips less than five miles. Bikes may be picked up at one location and returned to another on a system that allows for one-way trips.

 

 

 

 * Solar bicycle at Rs 40,000 in Kerala

 

 

Solar bicycle is the need of the hour since it is less polluting and will save fuel, says Shyam Kumar S, technical director, Innovation Experience, a Thiruvananthapuram-based non-profit organisation.

In a major initiative the organisation has developed two solar bicycles at a cost of Rs 40,000 each, these are now in use in the Kochi and Thiruvananthapuram campuses of UST Global, the founding and funding partner of Innovation Experience.

The company is planning to construct more bicycles and seeks government support for the project.

“If one rides a solar bicycle 20 km a day 0.33  litre petrol can be saved. The solar bicycle developed by us can travel up to 40 km on a single charge and can get charged while moving. The government can take the initiative to make solar bicycle mandatory at government offices at least in Kochi and Thiruvananthapuram,” Shyam Kumar said.

Though the production cost is Rs 40,000 now, upon mass construction it could be reduced to Rs 25,000. With the government subsidy the cost will come down to around `16,000, he said. The imported solar panel from Taiwan, which costs  around Rs 15,000, is the most expensive component of the solar bicycle.  Apart from solar bicycle, the company is  mainly into clean energy, waste management and innovative education initiatives. source



*Innovative solar cycle unveiled

 

 

Just two hours of sunlight and it is forty kilometres of happy biking. A sleek solar bicycle developed by the Trivandrum Global City of Innovation (TGCi) promises this and much more.

�TGCI, an initiative from the Kanthari International (formerly IISE), at Vellayani, unveiled this novel cycle at the annual meet of the Trivandrum Chapter of the� Confederation of Indian Industry that was hosted in partnership with the Trivandrum Global City of Innovation.

Come June, and UST Global will roll out a hundred of these solar bikes for their employees on the Technopark campus.� ‘’There, we intend to put up solar panels on top of a hut and charge a battery. Those who want to use the bikes can charge their cycles from the battery,’’ said Alexei Levene, managing director of TGCi.

�The three solar panels that are now used on the prototype are large. ‘’We are looking for smaller and more efficient panels. That would make the bike lighter too,’’ said Shyamkumar, technical director at the TGCi. The solar bike has a nice white basket in the front, a powerful light and a soft horn that works at the click of a switch. The bike can be pedalled too, if it runs out of solar energy or if you feel you need to exercise your leg muscles.

 

Solar Bicycle: Powered by Sun, Easy on Pockets !Posted on  by 

Disgusted with the frequent petrol price hikes and the histrionics that follow? Definitely it’s time to think of alternatives.

Look up – Sun and ways to harness its energy have now caught the fancy of even common people. So much so that when the Trivandrum Global City Initiative (TGCI) functioning out of Kanthari (formerly International Institute for Social Entrepreneurship) at Vellayani developed a uniquely designed solar bicycle, it took them four hours to transport it in a carrier-auto from Vellayani to Technopark.

The reason? Vehicle-owners, motorists and curious passersby kept stopping the vehicle to find out more about the cycle, its cost and availability.

The TGCI has developed two cycles, one in red and one in white as a pilot project for UST Global. If this is successful, the TGCI intends to identify a manufacturer and go in for mass production of the same. Their idea is to get 10,000 solar cycles on the roads of Ananthapuri, in the nearest future, while that of UST’s is a petrol-free campus.

‘’This solar cycle was developed to demonstrate that the time has come for eco-friendly, cost-effective and healthy alternatives to travel, rather than using expensive and environmentally damaging fuels such as petrol,’’ said Alexei Levene, managing director of TGCI.

The solar bicycle operates like any normal pedal cycle, but has an electric motor in the back wheel that lowers the resistance in pedalling, making it easier to go even uphill. The cycle has an overhead flexible covering lined with solar cells which can also double up as an umbrella, protecting you both from rain and blistering Sun. The sunlight charges a battery, kept in a box right beneath the seat.

Shyamkumar, technical director of TGCI, who has also designed and developed the cycle, said that the motor can be fully charged not just when it is out on the streets but also when left outside in the sunlight. This means that if you are at office, the bike gets charged by the time you want to ride back  home. When the Sun is not shining, the bike can be charged by electricity.

The first prototype of the solar bicycle that the TGCI developed had bulky solar panels on the carrier which could not be opened or charged while riding. ‘’We imported flexible solar panels that now work as a canopy over the rider’s head. Comparatively, this model is lighter and since the battery is kept beneath the seat, it is easier for the rider to balance the vehicle,’’ said Shyamkumar.

The bike has to be charged for six to eight hours and can run a cool 25-30 km when fully charged. The best part is, running out of solar power is nothing like running out of petrol. You can still get home, and get a good exercise too. Cycling is also known to be a great stress-buster.

‘’When you think about how much petrol and maintenance of a car cost each year, the opportunities for savings are immense and the solar cycle provides a healthy fast alternative,’’ said Alexei.

Shyamkumar gave some interesting figures on this. Consider a bike with a mileage of 60 km per litre of petrol. If it travels 20 km a day, within three days that one litre of petrol will be used up. He would need two litres per week and eight litres per month and approximately 100 litres per year. If one solar cycle can save one 100 litres of petrol a year, imagine how many litres of petrol 10,000 bikes can save?

This is precisely what the TGCI is aiming at – 10,000 solar bicycles in this city of Ananthapuri, to be followed by other regions of the State. ‘’We are looking to roll this solar cycle out across the region to enhance the quality of life, protect the environment and give citizens a real choice about how they travel,’’ said Alexei Levene.

The TGCI expects the cost to be around Rs 20,000 to Rs 25,000 when the cycles are mass-produced, with government subsidy. Not a huge amount to convert Thiruvananthapuram into an environment-friendly, pollution-free, solar city.

News Sourced from “The New Indian Express

 

 

 

Solar Bicycles: Easy on the Pocket, Friendly with the Environment

 

 

People who want to use clean renewable energy for their rides, have another option now. Unlike solar cars which are costly to use and maintain, the solar bicycles, aptly titled ‘Sun Cycles’ by its developors Subhadra Industries, are cheap and easy to maintain. What is more, the bicycles people are already using can also be transformed into solar bicycles.

These bicycles come with a 40 volts battery and two solar panels specially designed for the bicycles, a motor, and push buttons at the handle bars to regulate the acceleration, a controller, and a meter which gives reading of the speed of the bicycle.

Battery, controller, and solar panels, are fitted to the carrier of the bicycle. The panels absorb sun rays and transfer heat to the controller, from which it goes to batteries before getting retransmitted as solar power. From the controller, the power gets shifted to motor, which is fitted to the front wheel. The wheel rotates depending on the acceleration. As the hub of the front wheel is fitted with planetary gear system, it facilitates rotation of wheels by five times, enabling the bicycle to cover more distance.

Once the battery is fully charged, the bicycle can cover a distance of 25 km. The battery has to be replaced once every three years. It comes with a two-year guarantee. These bicycles can take a total weight of 90 kg.

The intending buyers have option of using either the big battery or the small one. The battery can also be charged with electricity in the absence of sun rays. These batteries can easily be dismantled or refitted. If the battery gets exhausted, the rider has the provision to use pedals to move forward. He also has the option of pedaling alongside motor, so that the rider does not feel the fatigue. He can totally depend on motor too for the ride, or alternatively, pedal his bicycle forward on his own. As the bicycle comes with normal parts, it can be repaired and its spares can be replaced at any of the bicycle repair shops, Subhadra Industries, which has produced this bicycle after a six-year long effort, claims.

 

 

 

Students of Srinivas Institute of Technology has developed a dual-powered bicycle that neither use petrol nor any other fuel.

The concept of their project is providing ease to the rider while riding a bicycle and also to conserve energy by all possible means. The motor and batteries with regeneration capabilities can provide a rider necessary relief when they feel exhausted by doing all the pedalling. The electricity generated by the solar panel and dynamos is stored in the battery, enabling a rider to switch over the operation to hybrid mode anytime and control the speed of the bicycle using the accelerator.

Students who have already conducted test rides, assert that the bicycle will run for 20km with the fully-charged two 12-Volt batteries. It will require about six hours to charge the battery fully using the solar panel. Meanwhile, the dynamos charge the 6-Volt battery which supplies power to the headlamp of the bicycle.

D Shrinivasa Mayya, principal of the college said the bicycle will create a revolution in a scenario where people are facing the brunt of rising prices of fuel and also have to contend with the problems of global warming as the innovation of his students uses only renewable energy.

Final year mechanical engineering students U Adithi, Ajaya R Pai, Dharmesh Patel and Nakul A Raichura, who developed the eco-friendly bicycle under the guidance of professors Jayaram Thumbe and K Dilip Kumar, are gearing up to increase the capacity of the bicycle and to obtain a patent for their project.

 

A solar-assisted bicycle that gives riders extra pedal power has been invented in 2011. The bicycle, called a Cycle Sol, has been invented by Miroslav Miljevic. The bright yellow device operates like a normal pedal cycle. It has a canopy lined with solar cells overhead.

When the user pedals in the sunshine the solar rays charge a battery. The battery powers an electric motor in the back wheel, propelling the bike at speeds of upto 15mph. It also lowers the resistance in pedalling to make it easier to go up hills.

When the sun is not shining, the bike can be charged by mains electricity.

 

Guim Valls Teruel has travelled across 14 countries on a hybrid solar electric bicycle. An electric bicycle comes with a battery pack that powers the wheels as the cyclist pedals. On pushing the pedal, one can feel a light jerk followed by an effortless motion of the bicycle.

The battery can be charged either through a regular power supply, like a mobile phone, or through solar panels. Teruel and Nguyen's bikes go up to a maximum of 25 kmph. A trailer of solar panels connected to the bike travels with them, charging batteries on the move. 

 

The Canadian developed E-V sunny bicycle is said to be the first solar electric bicycle driven completely from power derived from the sun’s rays.

Specifications:

Three mode biking options:

1)      Only pedal power

2)      Pedal assist electric power

3)      All electric power (No pedal option)

 

 

 

Features of E-V Sunny bicycle:

 

  • There are three ways to power the bike: pedal power, pedal assisted electric power or all electric.
  • Can reach speeds of up to 18 miles per hour
  • Front hub motor is fully encased and is waterproof
  • Flexible solar panels are incorporated into the wheels
  • Compact electric motor drives the bike’s front wheel.
  • The bike can also be charged using a wall outlet.

Many large metropolitan areas have implemented bicycle sharing systems to encourage the eco-friendly form of transportation while minimizing traffic log-jams.  In Copenhagen, they’ve taken the concept even further!

“Bicyclus,” invented by Stefano Marchetto, uses solar energy to power touch screens on the bicycles available for rent.  And the fleet of bicycles themselves include about 8,000 abandoned bikes, which are then retrofitted with computerized displays (including maps of the city and the ability to interact with other Bicyclus users).

 

 

When fully implemented, the Bicyclus system will operate with modular stations throughout the city – much like transit stations.  These stations are 100% solar powered.  Solar panels absorb UV light and convert it to clean electricity which is then used to recharge the bicycle’s computerized touch screens and electronic locks.

 

Riding bicycles is already an eco-friendly way to commute.  With a solar-powered bicycle-sharing system, Copenhagen is combining the best of all green worlds: recycling abandoned bicycles, encouraging bike use with an automated, computerized bicycle-sharing system, and relying on 100% clean, renewable solar power!

 * 

Solar bicycle helmet at $ 35 source

 

Design suggestion for a solar bicycle

 

Solar bike shed at University of Western Australia

22. OCTOBER 2012 | BY:  GEORG DREHER

Solar powering electric bicycles

Solarmatrix designed and installed a solar system at The University of Western Australia (UWA) to recharge a fleet of electric bicycles on campus. The complete system was designed in combination with the Australian companies Solar Bike, Penny Farthings Pushbike Parking and the facilities management team at the University.

This project aims to provide a practical and environmentally friendly means of transport to UWA. It also aims to reduce parking congestion and the cost of transport to University. The electric bicycle shed has charging points for 16 electric bicycles and is free to use by all staff and students, a quick email to UniPark will provide swipe card access and lockers.

The installed 2.3 kW system featuring SolarWorld panels from Germany's largest solar manufacturer, is guaranteed to produce an average of more than 9 kilowatt-hours each day for 25 years. Each bicycle has a range of about 40 km with light pedaling and will consume a daily maximum of 0.4 kilowatt-hours to fully recharge from flat. There is sufficient energy generated to power 22 e-bikes for a distance of 40 km each day.

Excess energy generated is fed into the grid to offset other electric demand by the University. Additional benefits include freeing up car parking spaces, a healthy no sweat and no stress ride to work, lower car maintenance and no parking costs. Using electric bicycles recharged by solar instead of driving can save 80 liters of petrol per day and over $40,000 per year. The electric bicycles used by the University include a range of bicycles that have been made electric with Solar Bike’s conversion kits; providing a custom and high quality solution.

This system shows some forward thinking from the University and is a great demonstration system for other organisations to follow. Parking, traffic, health and fossil fuel consumption are becoming ever greater problems and this is the type of solution that can alleviate some of the damage caused by human movement.

Electric bicycles are a very practical form of transport for all age groups and are great for dealing with Perth’s hot and windy summers and hilly terrain. For more information, please visit www.solarmatrix.com.au  

Solar bike park and charge shed

Links:



Read more: http://www.pv-magazine.com/services/press-releases/details/beitrag/solar-bike-shed-at-university-of-western-australia_100008916/#ixzz2BrVjEZFb

 

* bicycle made of cardboard by an Israeli inventor

 

EXPERIMENT ONE: A CRUDE FOUR-WHEEL PLAYA CRUISER

The Rhodes Car

After a decade of speculating about the practicality of building a solar-powered desert vehicle, in 1996 Bryan found an old four-wheeled pedal contraption for sale in Sacramento. Called the ‘Rhoades Car,’ it was originally designed to have two riders pedal it around senior complexes. Could it be used as the frame for a possible desert solar vehicle?

We went into high gear with the goal of building something we could take to the Burning Man arts festival in that same Black Rock desert where we first dreamed of solar playa vehicles. So we built a frame out of bent electrical conduit to hold some solar panels above the car, and outfitted it with a scrounged one-half horsepower motor connected to the rear axle through two stages of chain reduction. The motor was a brushed DC motor made for water pumps. We used industrial chain, sprockets and bearings, which was a mistake because of the large frictional losses. The Rhoades Car had two cranks in front, driving two chains to derailleurs in back. We added a third sprocket cluster and derailleur to the rear axle, though we never implemented gear changing on the driven cluster.

The electrical system was 12 Volt, with two marine batteries in parallel. Solar power came from an array of nine 36-Watt Carrizo Solar panels once used on the Arco solar array on the Carrizo plain in California. This 300W array charged the batteries directly with no controller. On a sunny morning we would see with delight that the panels were pushing 20 amps into the battery. On a sunny afternoon we could hear the electrolyte boiling inside. Hmmm...maybe it’s time to stop charging?

We also opted to design our own motor “controller,” an on-off switch rather than an actual speed controller. We would pedal up to our maximum endurable speed, then cut in the motor. Yabba-dabba-doo!

Our motor switching was accomplished with a bank of FETs activated by a switch on the steering wheel. The FETs were high power, low resistance devices which remained cool since they didn’t have to do much. We also replaced the original wimpy manual disk brake with a hydraulic brake used in go-karts, and energized it using a motorcycle master cylinder. The whole lumbering thing weighed about 600 pounds empty, closer to 1,000 with the two of us. It had a top speed on smooth pavement of 12 miles per hour, at about 60 Amps draw, though up to 100 amps when accelerating. We couldn’t be sure, however, because the mighty arcing current melted the 30 amp ammeter.

To Bryan, high current implied knife switches as controls, in the style of Nicola Tesla and Dr. Frankenstein. We installed a knife switch above Russell’s head as an emergency shutoff, connected via stiff 6 gauge wire to the battery terminals. On a side trip to a hot spring in 1997, the wires jiggled until they fatigued and broke, showering Russell with green sparks. He had to manually hold the wires on the terminals while bouncing along on the dirt road, hoping to wash the soot off himself in the spring.

Russ was seen underneath the vehicle half the time, wielding soldering irons to repair flamed-out circuits. This vehicle went to Burning Man for three years, after which the frustration/fun ratio exceeded unity.

EXPERIMENT TWO: A SMALLER QUADRACYCLE WITH PUSHER TRAILER

Xcelerator

It was clear that putting solar panels on wheeled vehicles made more sense when applied to lighter vehicles. As the whole system scales down, the weight and therefore the power required decreases as the cube of the scaling factor, but the solar power decreases as the square. You win if the system gets smaller. Thus a vehicle half the size may have a quarter of the solar, but an eighth of the required power. Little toys about two inches long powered only by a small array of cells on top zip along quite nicely. Clearly, as the size is decreased, the ratio between operating power and solar panel power decreases, so you can charge for less time between runs, and even run all day without having to charge (when the ratio is 1). One can use this run/charge power ratio as a design goal. For instance, if you expect to charge four times as long as you run, then a 100W panel with a 400W motor is about right. Of course there are inefficiencies and variations in available sun that aren’t taken into account in this simple approach, but this has been the rule of thumb for the design of the cars from the beginning, and it seems to work. The ratio we try to maintain is 4:1 or less, which is convenient for use at Burning Man, where one stops frequently to look at art.

Consequently, Russell decided to build a much-lighter, single person vehicle based on a four-wheel car from Trailmate, the Xcelerator. Trailmate builds indestructible pedal cars and trikes for bike trails near tourist attractions like Venice Beach, so these could withstand the Burning Man environs. To power it, Russell bought a pusher trailer made by Thunderstruck EV in Sonoma CA. This was a Bob Yak trailer with a 400W motor connected to the wheel with a chain. It freewheeled when not powered. The 24V brushless DC motor was powered by two 16AH gel cells in series. This trailer was designed to connect to any bike rear axle via a special axle with side pins, and so could be attached to any bike. Russell used it for his recumbent Terratrike commuting to work, enough to fry the motor on hills. Eventually the motor was replaced with a larger version.

Russell's recumbent commuting Terratrike

A 100W solar panel (recovered from the Rhoades Car project) was used as the power source, mounted on the trailer. This was a 12V source, so charging was implemented through a 12V controller using a switch to charge the batteries in parallel and discharge them in series. When the vehicle was stopped, one flipped the switch from run mode at 24V to charge at 12V. This solar trailer pushed the Trailmate car at about 14MPH. It was a truly useful vehicle with some carrying capacity in the trailer.

The vehicle evolved in subsequent years. A second panel was added on a frame above the Xcelerator pedal car, boosting the solar power to 200W. This allowed series operation at 24V and constant charging of the batteries through a 24V controller. A volt meter above the driver’s head on the overhead panel monitored the state of charge. As the pusher trailer acquired more mileage, the frame began to give out in back due to the asymmetrically mounted motor and the weakness of the aluminum frame, which was bouncing along with batteries and a 25 pound panel to boot. The bouncy Yak was not as good a choice for this as the Bob Ibex, which has suspension, and which was the basis for an evolved design by Thunderstruck (using a hub motor) before they abandoned this product altogether. It has been completely redesigned by Synthetic Transport, using a specially built trailer and lithium batteries.

Another problem on the playa was the accumulation of dust in the chain, causing wear and lengthening. The chain was tensioned by adjustment of motor-wheel separation, and would lose tension when ground out by dust, causing the chain to pop off. This was exacerbated by twisting of the frame due to the problems mentioned above.

EXPERIMENT THREE: CHAIN-DRIVEN QUADRACYCLE

Xcelerator with on-board motor

Finally the trailer version of the vehicle was abandoned altogether and a motor was mounted on the Xcelerator itself. This new iteration used a Cyclone drive system, designed to drive the chain on a regular bike. Really nothing more than an industrial brushless DC motor with a gear reducer and a freewheel sprocket, this was mounted on the bottom of the frame to drive the chain to the rear wheel. The Xcelerator is designed with a front chain connected to the crank, coupled to a rear chain to the wheel through a freewheel hub for a cruiser bike. This in combination with the Cyclone freewheel made pedaling and motoring independent.

The 12V, 100W overhead panel was replaced with two 12V, 50W panels in series. This made a nice compact vehicle every bit as useful as the previous ones. The main problem was the dust grinding, chain lengthening issue, as there was no spring idler to tension the chain. One has to carefully design these systems for the harsh environment on the playa.

EXPERIMENT FOUR: A HUB MOTOR DELTA TRIKE

Delta Trike on Driveway

Delta Trike on the Playa

Russell developed an alternate design based on hub motor power. Taking again a Trailmate base vehicle, the Low Rider, he put in a Crystalyte 406 motor in the 16” front wheel of this delta trike. The 406, run on 36 volts, he calculated, would give a maximum ground speed just sufficient for desert playa operation. The pedals drive one rear wheel, so motor and pedals are independent. To get the 36 volts the motor requires, Russell developed a charger that would take 12V from a panel and charge a bank of three 18AH gel cells. This was a set of magnetic latching relays sequenced from a digital counter, which applied power from the 12V charge controller to each battery in turn, 10 seconds per battery. This may not be the perfect way to treat the batteries, but it worked. There is a 12V, 85W panel (Kyocera) on a frame on top. This machine runs at 16MPH on flat pavement. A planned improvement is to replace the relay contraption with a DC-to-DC converter to 36V, and use a 36V charge controller. This vehicle was intended to be a design that could be built cheaply and easily. It has proved to be more reliable than the Xcelerator version, when run in identical conditions

By 2007, then, Russ and Bryan had experimental experience with building four solar vehicles and were eager to press on to their fifth and most-ambitious project, the Solar Touring Bike. source

 


SOLAR BIKE TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Construction location Bryan’s garage, Sacramento, California
Solar Panels 3 SunPower SPR-300 approx. 315 watts each or 945 total watts
Panel Output Approx. 60 volts @ 5.5 amps each
Batteries 3 12v Optima spiral lead-acid, 55 Ah Yellow-top, 42.5 lbs each
Motor controller Crystalyte 4840 48-volt 40 amp run modded to run at 36v
Solar charge Controller Outback MX60 charges up to 60 amps 12-60 volt input
Remote controller video display Dedicated 7” LCD screen and remote TV camera
Power/trip Display DrainBrain (Now cycleAnalyst)
AC battery chargers (3) Iota Engineering DLS-55 w/IQ4 55 amp @ 12v
Recumbent Tandem Trike Greenspeed (Australia) GTT 2002
Gearing 14 speeds, two front chainrings
Captain/Stoker Intercom Tandem-com wired duplex headsets
Rear Hub Motor Crystalyte 5303 brushless DC in 20" steel rim (Phoenix ‘Racer’ driven at 36 volts)
Front through-chain drive motor EcoSpeed 750-watt brushless DC w/planetary gear
Throttle Hall effect, switchable to control chain-drive motor or hub motor
Tires Tioga Comp-Pul, 20" x 1.75 inch @90 PSI
Drive tire Schwalbe Marathon Plus 20" x 1.75" @ 80 PSI
Headlight Six Luxeon 3w LED run at 24v
Amber Xenon Strobe Caterpillar 24v

PERFORMANCE

 

 Design touring cruise speed  20 mph
 Top speed  22 mph
 Pedal-up speed to start  7 mph
 Approximate muscle-powered wattage contribution  300 watts/hr (boosts speed from 17 to 19.5 mph at same motor power)
 Solar/human energy ratio  Approx 3:1 solar/human
 Watt-hours/mile @18 mph  30 w-h/mile (no pedaling)
 Watt-hours/mile @ 21 mph  50 w-h/mile (no pedaling)
 Miles per dollar of AC wall charge  400 miles per dollar
 Maximum range, battery only  50 miles @ 17 mph, 30 miles @ 22 mph
 Maximum range w/summer solar  200 miles/day
 Time to fully solar charge batteries  2 hours

MECHANICAL
 Nose-to-tail length (bike trailer)  23.5 feet
 Maximum width  41 inches
 Trailer touring cargo capacity  Approx. 15 cubic feet
 Bike weight w/o riders  160 lbs
 Trailer weight  300 lbs
 Total operating weight w/2 riders  860 lbs

 

source

 

* Solar powered Glow in the dark bicycle for safety

pure fix cycles kilo glow dark

source

 

 

 

 

 

26-year-old Portland residentAlexander Main wants to change the world by building tiny houses that can be pulled behind a bicycle. And he just finished his first prototype — which is a good thing because it's also his home. Main moved here from Germany just over a month ago and set out to build what he refers to as "the first of its kind self-sustainable solar powered Bike RV Trailer!" (and yes, he's very excited about it).

The BikeRV was built to be simple and inexpensive and Main plans to publish the plans and materials list free on his BikeRV Project website. "I want people to copy it, to improve it and to use it as an inspiration to create better models," he says.

 

 

source

 

 

 

 

THURSDAY, MAY 31, 2012

Solar Powered bicycle

Solar bicycle consists of battery,DC-DC boost converter, Solar Panel, Motor and Motor controller.It will get its energy from three places brakes,  pedals of the bicycle, and by solar-cell.


 There are three ways you can build solar powered cycle:

a) Build an electric cycle and charge its batteries using electricity provided by solar cells at home. One time charge is sufficient for 9 Miles (15 km approx).If you use this cycle to visit nearby places; this is good option for you. 

b) Second method consists of placing both solar cells and batteries on the cycle. Placing solar cells on bicycle itself would help in recharging batteries while travelling.

c)Third one and my most preferred one is to build hybrid cycle whose batteries not only charged by solar cell, but also use energy of regenerative braking and pedaling.



 


Useful Link:

Solar Electric Bicycle Project

Build your own solar bicycle http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1043&context=eespsource http://iprojectideas.blogspot.in/2012/05/solar-powered-bicycle.html

*WinSolar Energy Bike: As part of the 13th International Bicycle Design Competition (IBDC), designers Chun-Tung Chen and Kuoh-Siang Cheng created an intelligent bicycle concept that is quite unique.  Out of 938 entries from 55 countries, the WinSolar design was awarded the 2008 Excellent Prize and Merida Prize. The WinSolar Energy Bike is not only attractive; it can harness solar, wind, shock energy and pedal power.

WinSolar Features:

  • The Spoiler, located below the handles, is covered in solar panels and includes a wind-powered electricity generator.
  • The removable headlight, located on the front of the spoiler, can also be used as a flashlight.
  • The Adjustable Energy Plane is located below the main pipe. It can be adjusted to absorb more direct lighting.
  • The two front forks of the bike feature a coil and magnet configuration.

 

Solar electric bicycle videos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdfO3fkYoQU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vk9GcG9EJzA 

 

 

* Who in India will buy this Smart ebike bicycle ? 

The Smart ebike is now ready to pre-order.

 

It costs 500 UK pounds ie Rs 43000 for an electric bicycle. No one in India will buy it at this price.

 

Electric bicycle with removable power kit


The Velocity is a prototype pedal-electric bicycle with a power system that can be removed... 





For people who wouldn’t otherwise ride a bike, or who don’t want to arrive at work all hot and sweaty, electric-assist bicycles are a neat idea. Commonly referred to as pedelecs (for “pedal-electric”), they use an electric motor to augment the rider’s own body strength while pedaling, yet that motor can usually be switched off when they don’t need it. The only problem with that setup ... even when the motor isn’t being used, it and its battery are still there, weighing the bike down. For his prototype Velocity pedelec, however, Taiwanese designer Larry Chen came up with a creative solution – an easily-removable motor/battery unit. It was enough to win him a gold award at the latest International Bicycle Design Competition in Taiwan.


The “Power Core,” as it’s called, consists of a rechargeable battery pack, a control unit, two DC motors, a wireless antenna, and a drive shaft. The whole thing drops into the bike’s equivalent of a seat tube, where it is hidden from sight. Once in place, the downwards-facing drive shaft engages an internal helical gear on the bottom bracket, so the motor/pedal interface is also hidden from view and protected from the elements.

External wiring is eliminated, as a power meter built into the chain ring senses the pedaling torque being applied by the rider, and wirelessly sends that information to the control unit. That unit, in turn, determines how much extra power to send to the drivetrain.

 



















more


 

 

Audi, the German Automaker is showcasing their new sports electric bike concept, Audi Wörthersee. Well, it is not just another e-bike. It combines the eco-friendly design with lightweight construction (21 kg (46.30 lb) in weight) and networking ability. With use of bionic principles and the 26-inch wheels made from CFRP, the Audi designers have made a bike that looks futuristic. 

Amazing what German engineering can do with a bicycle !!

It may not be the appropriate product for the masses in India. 
But Just as there is a market for BMW, Audi, Toyota cars in India, this electric bicyle too will find a market. 

Audi-e-bike-Wörthersee-Austria 



The Audi e-bike Wörthersee runs on five different modes - In the ‘Pure’ mode the rider only propels the bike by means of the pedals. In the ‘Pedelec’ mode the rider is assisted by the electric motor. In the ‘eGrip’ program the Audi e-bike Wörthersee can be ridden with the electric motor providing all the necessary power. While, in the ’Wheelie’ mode the power flow is electronically controlled in order to assist the rider when the front wheel is in the air. If the rider wants to use the pedals and maintain a constant power input, the ‘Training’ mode can be chosen.

The rider’s smartphone can communicate by WLAN with the bike’s computer. The antenna is integrated into the front brake line. To ride the bike, the immobilizer is deactivated at the smartphone; the bike is then ready for use.

 

A Chunabhatti-based engineer, Shri PK Pillai has claimed to have invented a solar-motor tricycle

 

 

A Chunabhatti-based engineer, Shri PK Pillai has claimed to have invented a solar-motor pedi-cab, (a tricycle of sorts) that could potentially replace the traditional auto rickshaw. He has now sent the designs to IIT-Bombay for comments are looking for funding to promote the model commercially.

The solar powered version of thehumble cycle-rickshaw promises to offer a solution to the urban traffic woes in the suburbs.

“It’s like the tri-cycle that is run in northern states of India and in cities like London. My effort has gone into reducing that labour that goes into peddling the tri-cycle. A battery operated motor that could be recharged by solar power is the USP of the invention,” said Pillai, who has been involved with instrumentation and has over 32 years experience in industrial design.

How is the model different from a similar solar-based tri-cycle displayed at a recent auto show in Delhi designed by the state-run Centre for Scientific and Industrial Research

Pillai says, “The smoothness of the movement of any vehicle depends on the contact between two surfaces. Take the example of the train on how easy and effortless is it for a locomotive to pull a longer train. The steel wheels and steel rails make the movement faster and effortless. I have applied similar principles.” He further adds , “The experiments need to be conducted in a professional set up and am looking for funding to promote the invention. I am sure it could turn out to be a positive alternative to the auto rickshaws that ply in Mumbai.”  http://indianfusion.aglasem.com/?p=4722

 

 

 

Solar Rickshaws for India

 

The most common sight in India, the wooden rickshaw, pulled by people for a fee, could soon be replaced by modern, electric counterparts, as part of India's effort to reduce the heavy pollution it is facing, as well as its dependency on fossil fuels. New Delhi has hosted this month the exhibit of the first solar-powered rickshaw prototypes, whose job is to relieve the clogged streets that characterize today's India. 
 

 

 

The new models will be powered by a 36-volt solar cell and will be outfitted with power outlets for cell phones recharging capabilities. The wooden and insecure benches are to be replaced with foamed ones, for a plus of comfort and the ability to carry three people comfortably. The vehicle can also be pedaled normally, without using a drop of electricity. An FM radio is also mounted inside by default. Authorities say that this improved version of the rickshaw could offer a viable transport alternative to more than 8 million owners in India.
 

 

Also, developers considered the psychological impact of the new rickshaws. Currently, drivers of such vehicles are regarded as nothing more than mere slaves and are treated as such. The job is not very dignifying and some rickshaw pullers suffer from extremely low self-esteem. But all that could change once the new vehicles are entered into mass-production. http://news.softpedia.com/news/Solar-Rickshaws-For-India-95622.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

 

Solar Bikes, Best Solution To Soaring Fuel Price
An Indian electrician from Pune has developed asolar powered bike that has zero emissions. Ayub Khan Pathan, the inventor of the bike said he had worked on the prototype for more than three months. Mr Pathan has added a a DC solar panel thatconverts sunlight into electricity that is stored in a battery to the Yobike, India's first zero emissions bike.




Imran, Mr Pathan's nephew who also worked for the development of the bike said: “Petrol prices are rising and it is not feasible for people to use their own vehicles on a daily basis. There are already so many solar powered inverters and batteries, so we thought why not apply them to scooters as well. This will be especially useful in villages, where long power cuts are the norm."

Mr Pathan claims the solar bike will have a range of fifty to sixty kilometres per charge. Further he added that on a sunny day one can travel as much as 200 to 250 kilometres in a day as the bike will be charged continuously. The solar bike can also be charged using a multi-purpose socket during cloudy days. The bike emits zero emissions.

The Bangalore-based Sri Subadra Industries has come up with the prototype of a solar bicycle which, once charged for four hours, can be ridden up to 25 kilometres. Latha, one of the officials of the firm, says another model of lithium-ion battery will be launched in about three months. The bicycle is priced at Rs 22,000.  http://www.deccanherald.com/content/227815/now-take-cool-walk-sun.html 

*Solar bicycles projectSolar bicycles university projectSolar bicycles thesis
This project is consists of two part that is hardware and software. The hardware will be the bicycle and the software is the program of the controller to control the operation of the bicycle. To be more specific about this project, there will be using several things that are: Use solar energy to recharge the battery. Use PIC Microcontroller for charging system. Use high torque motor to drive the bicycle.more

HOw to build your own solar bicycle 

The solar bicycle can be easily created providing you have the necessary tools and equipments at your disposal. Here I am explaining a way to make a solar bicycle within $350. The cost may vary from area to area and depending on the price of the equipments and their availability.

Time Required

One can build this bicycle within two days; one day for procuring the necessary items and equipments and another day for assembling the equipments and charging the solar panel. For testing one more day is required.

Resource Required

For this project we can use a mountain bicycle as they are generally tough in any kind of situations and they can give a smoother experience. The main equipments are: motor which motor controller, 36V 10Ah SLA (sealed lead acid) battery pack with charger, mounting rack to mount solar panel and the battery, a 30watt solar panel and charge controller to convert the solar power into battery power. All these equipments are available in big retail stores such as Wal-Mart or one can also go for online shopping through eBay.

 

 

Estimated Cost

The equipments I have listed are to make basic version which one can avail within $300. But to get more power and mileage one can select higher range of products as well which may ranges from $400 - $800. Also I have assumed that users already have the bike with them so that cost hasn’t been included in the estimated cost.

Instructions

Basically there are three components-motor, throttle and the battery. They have to be properly connected with the solar panel and the bicycle.

First unscrew all the components of the bicycle, especially the wheels and the carrier section. The battery will fit in the carrier section while the motor will get assemble in the wheels. The throttle and the motor will get connected with the battery through the connectors.

Secondly, put the battery inside its box as specified in the manual. There are two small holes in the box through which the connecting wires will come out and these wires are directly connected with the battery.

Thirdly, put the motor kit in the inside rim of the front wheel and then assemble it in its proper place.

Fourthly, unscrew the break at right hand side of the handle (assuming the user is a right handed person) and pull it out. Install the throttle unit in here.

Next, connect the throttle and motor with the battery unit with the help of the connectors. Now assemble the entire cycle together and test it by pressing the throttle button whether the motor in the front wheel is working or not. Once that working, the next step is to work on solar panels.

Now take the solar panel and mount it on the front side or on above the battery chamber. There’s a connector from the solar panel comes out which will go to the battery input unit and it will get connected in here. Now once the solar panel is charged, it will provide power supply to the battery to get it charged and provide power to the motor and the throttle.

FAQ

More and more Arizona bicyclists are putting the metal to the pedal.

In this case, the metal being an add-on gas or electric motor that allows their bikes to reach legal speeds of up to 20 mph on city streets.

Industry experts say it's a national trend that is especially evident in Arizona, where riders don't need a license, registration or insurance.

Bicyclists, bike-shop owners, city officials and industry analysts describe an almost underground industry that thrives on word of mouth and Internet searches. Bike shops and big-box stores also sell powered bikes, parts or installation kits.

Brian Folts, 25, built his electric bike, or e-bike, in January, saving money with a $270 kit, plus $100 shipping from China. The Ahwatukee Foothills software engineer already was biking to his job on Kyrene Road.

"I hate the act of driving my car and sitting in traffic," Folts said. He says he drives to work maybe 10 times a year.

But constant biking was tiring his legs before big weekend cycling races, so he decided a little battery power once a week would help.

In 2011, there were 89,000 premanufactured electric bikes sold in the United States, according to Pike Research, a clean-technologymarket-research firm in Boulder, Colo. That was up from 70,000 the year before. Dave Hurst, a senior analyst at the company, predicts the number will double by 2015.

The total number of e-bikes in the U.S. hit half a million last year, almost triple the 170,000 on the road three years earlier, Pike estimates.

The flurry of powered bikes is fueled by several global trends, experts say. Among them: aging Baby Boomers who want to pedal less; the development of lighter battery packs; cheap manufacturing in China; and affordable shipping. Also, a deep recession and high gas prices have forced a new frugality.

Another factor is growing demand from younger people who can't afford the cost of insuring and maintaining a car and want a cheap means of getting to work or searching for a job.

Some people seek motorized bikes because they have no driver's license, sometimes resulting from drunken-driving penalties.

In Arizona, the heat also prompts riders to motorize their bikes.

Byron LeVan, a pharmaceutical worker in Glendale, got a $150 engine for his bike to save money after he lost his car to his ex-wife. He didn't want to spend $55 a month on a bus pass, a service he considered unreliable.

He was biking, but he suffered heat exhaustion on one summer ride. The motor shaved five minutes off his 20-minute commute.

Powered bikes come in a range of types and prices. The lowest-cost option, powered by a lawnmower engine, can be had for the price of a garage-sale bike and a $180 kit. Premade electric bikes sell for an average of $810, according to Pike, while custom models can cost as much as $30,000.

Customers can save money by buying batteries and installation kits online and doing the work themselves.

Almost all motorized bikes offer the option of pedaling. Some have a clutch that shifts between pedal and automated power. Some gas-powered models can be fitted with boosters, such as nitrogen tanks, to increase their speed.

By federal law, they are considered bicycles as long as they can be pedaled, go slower than 20 mph, and have batteries smaller than 750 watts or engines smaller than 49 cubic centimeters.

"A lot of our advertising is word of mouth. It's still an underground kind of thing and hasn't exploded yet," said Jeff Lin, who started selling gear online at BikeBerry.com from his warehouse near Anaheim four years ago.

PHOTO: In this April 25, 2012, photo, Phillip Robertson rides his electric-powered tricycle from his house in Phoenix to Chase Field to watch an Arizona Diamondbacks baseball game. Robertston converted the tricycle to electric power himself. More and more Arizona bicyclists are putting the metal to the pedal. In this case, the metal being an add-on gas or electric motor that allows their bikes to reach legal speeds of up to 20 mph on city streets. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle) MARICOPA COUNTY OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALESIn this April 25, 2012, photo, Phillip Robertson rides his electric-powered tricycle from his house in Phoenix to Chase Field to watch an Arizona Diamondbacks baseball game. Robertston converted the tricycle to electric power himself. More and more Arizona bicyclists are putting the metal to the pedal. In this case, the metal being an add-on gas or electric motor that allows their bikes to reach legal speeds of up to 20 mph on city streets. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle) MARICOPA COUNTY OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES

In Arizona, that means they can legally travel anywhere a regular bike can, which is everywhere: streets, bike lanes and sidewalks.

A typical gas-powered bike with a half-gallon tank can go 75 miles. A common battery can last 40 miles at high speeds before it needs to be recharged.

Paul Horak, who lives on the Caribbean island of St. Croix, started an Internet forum, motorbicycling.com, four years ago and has seen the number of visitors to the site increase from 10,000 to 45,000 in the last two years. He said the overwhelming majority of them are older than 50.

"It's like the fountain of youth for these guys," he said, explaining it gives Baby Boomers a chance to revisit the benefits of bicycling without the pain.

Phillip Robertson, 42, put together an electrified tricycle last year after he suffered serious injuries to his back and hips. He bought the bike for $75 on Craigslist, where he found a battery kit for $300.

"It really was a piece of cake," he said of the installation. "Anybody who can run a cable and tighten a bolt can do it. I did it in an hour, an hour and a half," Robertson said.

On a recent Wednesday, Robertson pedaled to an ArizonaDiamondbacks day game, but normally he rides around his neighborhood in central Phoenix to medical appointments and the store. "It's very therapeutic. Instead of 'woe is me,' staying in the house, this gets me out of that funk," he said.

Experts say that while the trend initially attracted Baby Boomers, the market also is catering now to commuters and younger people.

Horak said he's seeing an increasing number of younger people in his chat rooms. "We're seeing more and more kids riding these things to college," he said.

Hurst, of Pike Research, estimates that 80 percent of powered bicyclists ride gas models. Almost all of those are home-built, while half of the e-bikes on the road are manufactured.

The gas models are popular in Arizona, according to a leading vendor of parts and kits based in Southern California.

"A lot of our advertising is word of mouth. It's still an underground kind of thing and hasn't exploded yet," said Jeff Lin, who started selling gear online at BikeBerry.com from his warehouse near Anaheim four years ago. Sales this year have climbed 30 percent from last year, he said, adding that Arizona, California and Florida are among his biggest markets.

The popularity and informality of the business prompted him to start a wholesale service a year ago. He noticed customers would start businesses of their own, retrofitting bikes out of their garages, so he offered to sell kits in bulk.

Mike Casto did just that with electric bikes five years ago. What started as a hobby in his garage became Mr. B's Electrified Bicycles in Surprise and has expanded to Colorado and Texas. Most of his prefab bikes sell for $1,200 to $2,000, and the average age of his clients is 58.

He, too, has seen more buyers as gas prices climb, though analysts say fuel costs don't drive demand.

"Every time it spikes, we see more interest," Casto said.

Phoenix traffic engineer Kerry Wilcoxon, who runs the city's bike program, began noticing powered bikes a couple of years ago. Now he sees them a couple of times a week.

He's worried about the safety implications, but the issue hasn't risen to the attention yet of the police or City Council. "I've seen them on travel lanes, bike lanes and sidewalks," Wilcoxon said.

When powered bikes become numerous enough or there is a bad enough accident, something made more likely by their higher possible speeds, the city may take more notice, he said.

___

Information from: The Arizona Republic, http://www.azcentral.com

 

 

 

 

Rent a Bike, Make a Friend

 

 

 

 

 

Solar electric bicycle 

 

another amateur solar electric bicycle 

 

12th May 

 

Brammo’s Wicked New Empulse & Empulse R Electric Motorcycles Unveiled
empulse r


Brammo, an electric motorcycle leader, unveiled its new Empulse and Empulse R this week in Los Angeles. Susanna Schick was at the unveiling and has more:

 



Cyomo Electric Bike Design By Raymond 

Cyomo is a comfy and eco friendly electric bike that is designed with solar panel for harvesting sun energy to recharge its battery. It is designed by Raymond Bessemer for daily commuting purpose. While the Cyomo is parked on the outdoor, the solar panel will harness the solar energy to recharge the internal inside it. For recharge the battery with solar panel, user just need to foldout the solar panel to lets the battery for harnessing the sun energy. And while riding this comfortable Cyomo, the solar panel can be folded vertically, so that user feel more comfortable when riding this comfy electric bike. 
http://www.healtycycle.com/cyomo-electric-bike-with-solar-panel/ 






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Sanya police launch solar-powered bicycle patrols in the city http://www.whatsonsanya.com/news-20744-sanya-police-launch-solar-powered-bicycle-patrols-in-the-city.html

 

 

 

 

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31 Comments

  • shankar
    shankar -

    http://www.bangaloremirror.com/article/10/2011061720110617000028851a4bdfda5/Smart-bike-gets-sun-to-do-the-hard-work.html Like

  • Gopi625
    Gopi625 -

    The Solar Powered Bicycle is good. But how is the acceptance in India which will decide its success. Now every kid in the town wants his first vehicle like the scooty or scooterete.

    This is actually a concept of CITY BICYCLE which is widely popular in Japan and few European countries where dedicated Bicycle tracks are there. Its a comfort driving for short distances and enjoyable. 
    Like

  • anna
    anna -

    This idea should work well in both cities in villages. We need to create an eco system around it as shankar says. 


    The battery takes about 4 5 hours to be fully charged and then can be rode for about a distance of 20 kms. It can also be charged from an electric source. Like most of the cars today, this bicycle too has a provision to charge cell phones.
     
    Dr Srinivas Mayya D, principal of SIT said that the total expense of the bicycle is estimated at Rs 13,000 . We have successfully test-driven the bicycle for 20 kms on the highway, he claimed.


    I dont see what the IP is here. I mean the intellectual property. I dont see any here.HOwever What Bharani says is very true. If there is an IP, apply for it and then go public. Like

  • barani
    barani -

    This is an excellent way to progress; however a very bad way to go public. The patent laws are very clear about one rule: never publicize your invention until after you file for the patent and get the acknowledgement. For that matter, the rule states clearly that going public is a clear violation of the rule and a disqualification to obtain a patent. How come the college didn't know these basic ip protection steps?

    Like

  • shankar
    shankar -

    There can be battery charging stations in central locations. There can also be battery exchange centres where people can exchange their batteries belonging to a particular batch, a batch mentioning a particular period.Thus one creates an eco system around the solar bio cycle.
    Like

  • vijaychakrawar
    vijaychakrawar -

    Its very good thing , any way people start to use clean energy also it saves national expenses on fuel in form of Subsidy.
    But
    I think its not invention, since already Yo-Bike in market, only the charging is done by solar instead of mains AC power.

    Like

  • anna
    anna -

    Yes Vijachakrawar

    There are many bikes which are operating with solar energy and battery.

    Like you said, it is very very appropriate for India. The poor and the middle class can use it.
    It is also good for India as it is the diabetic capital of the world.

    Some cycling can help them.


    Like

  • Nitin
    Nitin -


       i heard the latest trend in urban development is to build self contained units-offices, residences, and shopping malls in close proximity; these bikes will then become very handy as most people will walk or bike to all places  Like

  • Shweta
    Shweta -

    Solar bikes hold promise for future



    Ayubkhan Pathan and his nephew, Imran Pathan, owners of Alright Electronics and Electricals, made the solar bike out of an old bike in three months. A solar panel is attached to the front of the bike with the help of which the battery attached to the bike 
    is charged.

    Once fully charged in the sun — which automatically happens even when the rider is travelling in the sun — the bike can cover up to 250 km in bright sunlight at speeds of up to 50 km per hour. The battery supply is automatically discontinued when the battery 
    is charged.

    The bike starts with a switch: it does not need a kick or a starter, said Ayubkhan, who hails from a farmer’s family from Malwad village in Shrirampur taluka of Ahmednagar district. After completing his graduation in science in 1988, he started Alright Electronics and Electricals in Pune in 1990.

    He has earlier made solar emergency lamps, solar inverter and other solar equipment. The uncle-nephew duo has set up a huge solar emergency lamp at Shrimant Dagdusheth Halwai Ganesh temple in the city and at the dargah of Hazrat Kamar Ali Durvesh, at Khed Shivapur, which Ayubkhan claims is the largest in the world.

    Ideal products for india. http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report_solar-bikes-hold-promise-for-future_1544188

    Like

  • Shweta
    Shweta -

    young Americans are more focused on bicycles and public transportation than their parents were. With younger perspectives focused online and with more and more jobs offering telecommuting as a viable option, young people are relying less on owning a car. Like solar powergoing green with bicycles is becoming a common phrase with the younger set.

    We should have such options for cycles in India as well as for solar powered bicycles.

    In fact, in some urban areas, owning a vehicle is downright inconvenient. Between insurance, gasoline, car maintenance and parking fees, the cost of owning a car coupled with expensive household costs is too high for some young urbanites. Some cities have begun addressing this shift and are establishing bike lanes in busy downtowns. Yes, we’re beginning to see some real changes towards a bike-friendly society.

    What if you only need a bike for a short time period? There are bike shops that rent bicycles by the hour, but if you need the bike for a couple weeks while on vacation, the price quickly becomes steep. Or what if you contracted work in another city and need a bike for a month or two? Thanks to Splinster, you now have affordable and convenient bike rental options for longer lengths of time than just tooling around the beach for a day. And using the service is easier than building a photography website.

    It works like this: people who want to rent just post pictures of their bikes and rates on Splinster. Someone who wants a bike rental for a short term enters their zip code on Splinster to find a nearby bike owner. Then they decide on the bike they want to rent and submit their interest. The renter and bike owner then agree on a pick-up and drop-off location and time. Payment is submitted to Splinster, which, in turn, then pays the person renting the bike. The added bonus is the potential for making friendships along the way.

    Source: Planetsave (http://s.tt/1aGJI)


    A Chunabhatti-based engineer, Shri PK Pillai has claimed to have invented a solar-motor tricycle

    A Chunabhatti-based engineer, Shri PK Pillai has claimed to have invented a solar-motor pedi-cab, (a tricycle of sorts) that could potentially replace the traditional auto rickshaw. He has now sent the designs to IIT-Bombay for comments are looking for funding to promote the model commercially.

    The solar powered version of thehumble cycle-rickshaw promises to offer a solution to the urban traffic woes in the suburbs.

    “It’s like the tri-cycle that is run in northern states of India and in cities like London. My effort has gone into reducing that labour that goes into peddling the tri-cycle. A battery operated motor that could be recharged by solar power is the USP of the invention,” said Pillai, who has been involved with instrumentation and has over 32 years experience in industrial design.

    How is the model different from a similar solar-based tri-cycle displayed at a recent auto show in Delhi designed by the state-run Centre for Scientific and Industrial Research

    Pillai says, “The smoothness of the movement of any vehicle depends on the contact between two surfaces. Take the example of the train on how easy and effortless is it for a locomotive to pull a longer train. The steel wheels and steel rails make the movement faster and effortless. I have applied similar principles.” He further adds , “The experiments need to be conducted in a professional set up and am looking for funding to promote the invention. I am sure it could turn out to be a positive alternative to the auto rickshaws that ply in Mumbai.”  http://indianfusion.aglasem.com/?p=4722

    Solar Rickshaws for India

    The most common sight in India, the wooden rickshaw, pulled by people for a fee, could soon be replaced by modern, electric counterparts, as part of India's effort to reduce the heavy pollution it is facing, as well as its dependency on fossil fuels. New Delhi has hosted this month the exhibit of the first solar-powered rickshaw prototypes, whose job is to relieve the clogged streets that characterize today's India. 
     

    The new models will be powered by a 36-volt solar cell and will be outfitted with power outlets for cell phones recharging capabilities. The wooden and insecure benches are to be replaced with foamed ones, for a plus of comfort and the ability to carry three people comfortably. The vehicle can also be pedaled normally, without using a drop of electricity. An FM radio is also mounted inside by default. Authorities say that this improved version of the rickshaw could offer a viable transport alternative to more than 8 million owners in India.
     

    Also, developers considered the psychological impact of the new rickshaws. Currently, drivers of such vehicles are regarded as nothing more than mere slaves and are treated as such. The job is not very dignifying and some rickshaw pullers suffer from extremely low self-esteem. But all that could change once the new vehicles are entered into mass-production. http://news.softpedia.com/news/Solar-Rickshaws-For-India-95622.shtml

    Solar Bikes, Best Solution To Soaring Fuel Price
    An Indian electrician from Pune has developed asolar powered bike that has zero emissions. Ayub Khan Pathan, the inventor of the bike said he had worked on the prototype for more than three months. Mr Pathan has added a a DC solar panel thatconverts sunlight into electricity that is stored in a battery to the Yobike, India's first zero emissions bike.




    Imran, Mr Pathan's nephew who also worked for the development of the bike said: “Petrol prices are rising and it is not feasible for people to use their own vehicles on a daily basis. There are already so many solar powered inverters and batteries, so we thought why not apply them to scooters as well. This will be especially useful in villages, where long power cuts are the norm."

    Mr Pathan claims the solar bike will have a range of fifty to sixty kilometres per charge. Further he added that on a sunny day one can travel as much as 200 to 250 kilometres in a day as the bike will be charged continuously. The solar bike can also be charged using a multi-purpose socket during cloudy days. The bike emits zero emissions.





    Solar bikes hold promise for future



    Ayubkhan Pathan and his nephew, Imran Pathan, owners of Alright Electronics and Electricals, made the solar bike out of an old bike in three months. A solar panel is attached to the front of the bike with the help of which the battery attached to the bike 
    is charged.

    Once fully charged in the sun — which automatically happens even when the rider is travelling in the sun — the bike can cover up to 250 km in bright sunlight at speeds of up to 50 km per hour. The battery supply is automatically discontinued when the battery 
    is charged.

    The bike starts with a switch: it does not need a kick or a starter, said Ayubkhan, who hails from a farmer’s family from Malwad village in Shrirampur taluka of Ahmednagar district. After completing his graduation in science in 1988, he started Alright Electronics and Electricals in Pune in 1990.

    He has earlier made solar emergency lamps, solar inverter and other solar equipment. The uncle-nephew duo has set up a huge solar emergency lamp at Shrimant Dagdusheth Halwai Ganesh temple in the city and at the dargah of Hazrat Kamar Ali Durvesh, at Khed Shivapur, which Ayubkhan claims is the largest in the world.

    Ideal products for india. http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report_solar-bikes-hold-promise-for-future_1544188

    Like

  • dheen
    dheen -

    More and more Arizona bicyclists are putting the metal to the pedal.

    In this case, the metal being an add-on gas or electric motor that allows their bikes to reach legal speeds of up to 20 mph on city streets.

    Industry experts say it's a national trend that is especially evident in Arizona, where riders don't need a license, registration or insurance.

    Bicyclists, bike-shop owners, city officials and industry analysts describe an almost underground industry that thrives on word of mouth and Internet searches. Bike shops and big-box stores also sell powered bikes, parts or installation kits.

    Brian Folts, 25, built his electric bike, or e-bike, in January, saving money with a $270 kit, plus $100 shipping from China. The Ahwatukee Foothills software engineer already was biking to his job on Kyrene Road.

    "I hate the act of driving my car and sitting in traffic," Folts said. He says he drives to work maybe 10 times a year.

    But constant biking was tiring his legs before big weekend cycling races, so he decided a little battery power once a week would help.

    In 2011, there were 89,000 premanufactured electric bikes sold in the United States, according to Pike Research, a clean-technologymarket-research firm in Boulder, Colo. That was up from 70,000 the year before. Dave Hurst, a senior analyst at the company, predicts the number will double by 2015.

    The total number of e-bikes in the U.S. hit half a million last year, almost triple the 170,000 on the road three years earlier, Pike estimates.

    The flurry of powered bikes is fueled by several global trends, experts say. Among them: aging Baby Boomers who want to pedal less; the development of lighter battery packs; cheap manufacturing in China; and affordable shipping. Also, a deep recession and high gas prices have forced a new frugality.

    Another factor is growing demand from younger people who can't afford the cost of insuring and maintaining a car and want a cheap means of getting to work or searching for a job.

    Some people seek motorized bikes because they have no driver's license, sometimes resulting from drunken-driving penalties.

    In Arizona, the heat also prompts riders to motorize their bikes.

    Byron LeVan, a pharmaceutical worker in Glendale, got a $150 engine for his bike to save money after he lost his car to his ex-wife. He didn't want to spend $55 a month on a bus pass, a service he considered unreliable.

    He was biking, but he suffered heat exhaustion on one summer ride. The motor shaved five minutes off his 20-minute commute.

    Powered bikes come in a range of types and prices. The lowest-cost option, powered by a lawnmower engine, can be had for the price of a garage-sale bike and a $180 kit. Premade electric bikes sell for an average of $810, according to Pike, while custom models can cost as much as $30,000.

    Customers can save money by buying batteries and installation kits online and doing the work themselves.

    Almost all motorized bikes offer the option of pedaling. Some have a clutch that shifts between pedal and automated power. Some gas-powered models can be fitted with boosters, such as nitrogen tanks, to increase their speed.

    By federal law, they are considered bicycles as long as they can be pedaled, go slower than 20 mph, and have batteries smaller than 750 watts or engines smaller than 49 cubic centimeters.

    "A lot of our advertising is word of mouth. It's still an underground kind of thing and hasn't exploded yet," said Jeff Lin, who started selling gear online at BikeBerry.com from his warehouse near Anaheim four years ago.

    PHOTO: In this April 25, 2012, photo, Phillip Robertson rides his electric-powered tricycle from his house in Phoenix to Chase Field to watch an Arizona Diamondbacks baseball game. Robertston converted the tricycle to electric power himself. More and more Arizona bicyclists are putting the metal to the pedal. In this case, the metal being an add-on gas or electric motor that allows their bikes to reach legal speeds of up to 20 mph on city streets. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle) MARICOPA COUNTY OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALESIn this April 25, 2012, photo, Phillip Robertson rides his electric-powered tricycle from his house in Phoenix to Chase Field to watch an Arizona Diamondbacks baseball game. Robertston converted the tricycle to electric power himself. More and more Arizona bicyclists are putting the metal to the pedal. In this case, the metal being an add-on gas or electric motor that allows their bikes to reach legal speeds of up to 20 mph on city streets. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle) MARICOPA COUNTY OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES

    In Arizona, that means they can legally travel anywhere a regular bike can, which is everywhere: streets, bike lanes and sidewalks.

    A typical gas-powered bike with a half-gallon tank can go 75 miles. A common battery can last 40 miles at high speeds before it needs to be recharged.

    Paul Horak, who lives on the Caribbean island of St. Croix, started an Internet forum, motorbicycling.com, four years ago and has seen the number of visitors to the site increase from 10,000 to 45,000 in the last two years. He said the overwhelming majority of them are older than 50.

    "It's like the fountain of youth for these guys," he said, explaining it gives Baby Boomers a chance to revisit the benefits of bicycling without the pain.

    Phillip Robertson, 42, put together an electrified tricycle last year after he suffered serious injuries to his back and hips. He bought the bike for $75 on Craigslist, where he found a battery kit for $300.

    "It really was a piece of cake," he said of the installation. "Anybody who can run a cable and tighten a bolt can do it. I did it in an hour, an hour and a half," Robertson said.

    On a recent Wednesday, Robertson pedaled to an ArizonaDiamondbacks day game, but normally he rides around his neighborhood in central Phoenix to medical appointments and the store. "It's very therapeutic. Instead of 'woe is me,' staying in the house, this gets me out of that funk," he said.

    Experts say that while the trend initially attracted Baby Boomers, the market also is catering now to commuters and younger people.

    Horak said he's seeing an increasing number of younger people in his chat rooms. "We're seeing more and more kids riding these things to college," he said.

    Hurst, of Pike Research, estimates that 80 percent of powered bicyclists ride gas models. Almost all of those are home-built, while half of the e-bikes on the road are manufactured.

    The gas models are popular in Arizona, according to a leading vendor of parts and kits based in Southern California.

    "A lot of our advertising is word of mouth. It's still an underground kind of thing and hasn't exploded yet," said Jeff Lin, who started selling gear online at BikeBerry.com from his warehouse near Anaheim four years ago. Sales this year have climbed 30 percent from last year, he said, adding that Arizona, California and Florida are among his biggest markets.

    The popularity and informality of the business prompted him to start a wholesale service a year ago. He noticed customers would start businesses of their own, retrofitting bikes out of their garages, so he offered to sell kits in bulk.

    Mike Casto did just that with electric bikes five years ago. What started as a hobby in his garage became Mr. B's Electrified Bicycles in Surprise and has expanded to Colorado and Texas. Most of his prefab bikes sell for $1,200 to $2,000, and the average age of his clients is 58.

    He, too, has seen more buyers as gas prices climb, though analysts say fuel costs don't drive demand.

    "Every time it spikes, we see more interest," Casto said.

    Phoenix traffic engineer Kerry Wilcoxon, who runs the city's bike program, began noticing powered bikes a couple of years ago. Now he sees them a couple of times a week.

    He's worried about the safety implications, but the issue hasn't risen to the attention yet of the police or City Council. "I've seen them on travel lanes, bike lanes and sidewalks," Wilcoxon said.

    When powered bikes become numerous enough or there is a bad enough accident, something made more likely by their higher possible speeds, the city may take more notice, he said.

    ___

    Information from: The Arizona Republic, http://www.azcentral.com

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  • dheen
    dheen -

    Audi, the German Automaker is showcasing their new sports electric bike concept, Audi Wörthersee. Well, it is not just another e-bike. It combines the eco-friendly design with lightweight construction (21 kg (46.30 lb) in weight) and networking ability. With use of bionic principles and the 26-inch wheels made from CFRP, the Audi designers have made a bike that looks futuristic. 

    Amazing what German engineering can do with a bicycle !!

    It may not be the appropriate product for the masses in India. 
    But Just as there is a market for BMW, Audi, Toyota cars in India, this electric bicyle too will find a market. 

    Audi-e-bike-Wörthersee-Austria 



    The Audi e-bike Wörthersee runs on five different modes - In the ‘Pure’ mode the rider only propels the bike by means of the pedals. In the ‘Pedelec’ mode the rider is assisted by the electric motor. In the ‘eGrip’ program the Audi e-bike Wörthersee can be ridden with the electric motor providing all the necessary power. While, in the ’Wheelie’ mode the power flow is electronically controlled in order to assist the rider when the front wheel is in the air. If the rider wants to use the pedals and maintain a constant power input, the ‘Training’ mode can be chosen.

    The rider’s smartphone can communicate by WLAN with the bike’s computer. The antenna is integrated into the front brake line. To ride the bike, the immobilizer is deactivated at the smartphone; the bike is then ready for use.

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  • dheen
    dheen -

    Electric bicycle conversion kit catches on in California

    The US market can be bleak. I will bet on the Indian market for low cost electric bicycle conversion kits. Not just in the semi urban and rural markets. But also in cities. 

    Electric bicyles can be  faster in city traffic and safer too.

    T

    In California, e-bikes are not categorized as motor vehicles and do not require a driver’s license or registration to ride, making them accessible and inviting to consumers.

    Nationally, e-bike sales reached roughly 300,000 in 2010, double the number in 2009, according to Electric Bikes Worldwide Reports, a service that determines electric bike sales. E-bikes have been growing at a 21 percent year clip and could reach sales of 785,000 units a year by 2016, according to Pike Research, a clean energy market research firm.

    These numbers, however, are dwarfed by the immense figures being registered overseas. In Europe, an estimated 1 million e-bikes were sold in 2010, according to Electric Bikes Worldwide. In China, among the 450 million bike riders, more than 100 million occupy the roads with their electric bikes.

    Despite promising U.S. projections from consultants, manufacturers and merchants of e-bikes, its sluggish growth in American markets compared to the rest of the world has cast doubt on its future here. (Photo by Reiner Kolberg, Creative Commons) 

    “I don’t believe e-biking will become significant in America,” said 47-year-old Bill Knowles, an engineer in Boston who has been riding his e-bike since 2008. “We’re a car culture.”

    Knowles is a life-long bicyclist who uses his e-bike to commute 12 miles to work two or three times a week, but still sees major obstacles that must be overcome for e-bikes to be truly accepted and embraced by the American market.

    “We (Americans) have a ‘bicycle is exercise’ mentality. There are also a lot of commercial e-bikes that perform poorly. All these factors make it tough for e-bikes to be widely accepted in this country,” Knowles said.

    Robert Kalkman, a 52-year-old commercial building maintenance manager in Peoria, Illinois who rides to work on his e-bike, also has a bleak outlook for the market.

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  • dheen
    dheen -

    Electric bicycle with removable power kit

    The Velocity is a prototype pedal-electric bicycle with a power system that can be removed... 





    For people who wouldn’t otherwise ride a bike, or who don’t want to arrive at work all hot and sweaty, electric-assist bicycles are a neat idea. Commonly referred to as pedelecs (for “pedal-electric”), they use an electric motor to augment the rider’s own body strength while pedaling, yet that motor can usually be switched off when they don’t need it. The only problem with that setup ... even when the motor isn’t being used, it and its battery are still there, weighing the bike down. For his prototype Velocity pedelec, however, Taiwanese designer Larry Chen came up with a creative solution – an easily-removable motor/battery unit. It was enough to win him a gold award at the latest International Bicycle Design Competition in Taiwan.


    The “Power Core,” as it’s called, consists of a rechargeable battery pack, a control unit, two DC motors, a wireless antenna, and a drive shaft. The whole thing drops into the bike’s equivalent of a seat tube, where it is hidden from sight. Once in place, the downwards-facing drive shaft engages an internal helical gear on the bottom bracket, so the motor/pedal interface is also hidden from view and protected from the elements.

    External wiring is eliminated, as a power meter built into the chain ring senses the pedaling torque being applied by the rider, and wirelessly sends that information to the control unit. That unit, in turn, determines how much extra power to send to the drivetrain.



















    more



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  • Nitin
    Nitin -

    Some intersting links for solar electric bicycles in India, cost of solar bicycles, solar bicycles kit, 

    http://www.gotwind.org/diy/solar_electric_bicycle_project.htm 

     I have built my own electric solar-cycle with a layout I haven't seen before,  the solar panels double up as mud guards,  and I have made my own battery packs using 13ah ni-mh cells.  The batteries are arranged in  3 packs of 11 each.  Each battery pack contains 11 batteries taking up the same space as a Yuasa NP 12-12   this gives me a higher Ah rating ,higher terminal voltage and a lower mass.

    You can see the layout from the photo . The PWM controller is mounted between the top two battery packs with a pancake motor mounted above. The power is transmitted through a toothed pulley belt + belt tensioner to a friction 

    drive. On full charge it will do about 25 mph probably illegal in UK which drops to about 22. I have done about 150 miles on it and reckon it does 12 miles WITHOUT pedaling. What do u think?


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  • Nitin
    Nitin -

    http://bikes-as-transportation.com/my-solar-bicycle/ 

    http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Vehicles/KevinEBike.htm 

    Bicycles design - not solar bicycles site  http://bicycledesign.net/

    Design and component details of an electric bicycle. The batteries can be recharged using solar energy. So in a way it is a  solar bicycle.  http://www.electricycle.com/ebike2.htm
    It is a detailed site complete with details.

    Australian sexy looking electric bicyles.  http://www.solarbike.com.au/electric_bicycles.php
    I guess the batteries can be recharged using solar power.

    Solar powered bicycle boat !! Awesome  http://ecoble.com/2008/04/15/awesome-solar-powered-bicycle-boat-design/ Like

  • Nitin
    Nitin -

    Smart electric pedelec, for £2,500
    An electrib bicycle for Rs 2 lakhs !!


    The pedelec (pedal electric cycle) can be ordered now for late May deliveries, though we don't expect demand to outstrip supply for what is, basically, a mode of transport that retains all that's harrowing about a bicycle but removes the major benefit - improved cardiovascular fitness.

    Still, it's a stylish looking bike, and will make going up hills a doddle.

    It's won a design award already, in fact, taking the esteemed red dot gong for 'best of the best' design quality, ahead of 4,500 other products.

    Its electric motor is a 200-watt unit housed in the rear wheel hub, which provides four levels of power assistance to lethargic riders, and is switched on as soon as the pedals begin to move. So, the cyclist will always have to physically pedal, though they can select the amount of assistance from the motor.

    It features regenerative braking to recharge the battery when the stoppers are on, and a mobile phone cradle is an option, so that riders can charge their mobiles on the move.
     
    The aluminium framed bike weighs 26kg (about four stone), and is available in either white with green trim or matte grey with orange. http://uk.autoblog.com/2012/05/08/smart-electric-bike-on-sale-for-2-500/
    Like

  • Nitin
    Nitin -

       



     


     






     






     

     






     

     





     



    All the above are some pics selected by me after searching for solar bicycle in google images.
    Here is an interesting site selling a solar bicycle 
    http://newsolarbike.com/  with a solar generator.

    The following are what their website offers. Check out. Check out with some of those who already bought their bicycles and then buy, if you are convinced.

    Here's what makes our new solar bike so amazing...

    • Handcrafted and built to our rigorous specifications -- for Solutions From Science customers and subscribers only!
    • Strong 500-watt motor propels you up to 21 mph on flat land... without even pedaling. Go even faster when you pedal.
    • The world's only electric bike that plugs into the PowerSource 1800 solar generator for quick charging. It is literally a solar-powered bike!
    • Ride hundreds or thousands of miles on your bike using only the free energy of the sun. (Never worry about "Miles Per Gallon" or fuel efficiency again!)
    • Recharge the bike while you sleep -- and be ready to ride again by morning!
    • Save a bundle by slashing your gas bill. If you live in an urban area or in a warmer climate, you may never have to buy gas again! (As gas prices rise, this could literally save you thousands of dollars over the next few years.)
    • Ride up to 55 miles on a single charge... using the pedal-assist to make biking easy! (Ride even further if you use the pedal-assist sparingly.)
    • 7 different gears for all riding conditions -- make quick work of long flats or even steep hills.
    • The motor matches your pedaling cadence perfectly. It never "pulls" you faster than you want to go -- and it never "pushes" you when you're trying to stop. (In fact, the motor is "cut off" the exact moment you pull the brakes!)
    • The perfect money-saving vehicle for running quick errands around town. (Ride to the bank, the grocery store, or anywhere else you need to go.)
    • Park it anywhere -- sidewalks included. (Rather than hunt for a close parking space, just pull up to the front of the building, park your bike, and enter!)
    • No license plates required! Just hop on your New Solar Bike and ride!
    • Finally, a bike you can actually ride to work.





































    Like

  • Rahul
    Rahul -

    A must see site for those interested in designing a solar bicycle of Terry Hope 
    Solar-Cross (e bike)


    Terry Hope a self-taught solar electric vehicle inventor/designer/builder. After committing 3 years of my life building my first EV (THEKPV) I had gathered enough knowledge to begin another solar EV project which I named Solarcross

    This solar e-bike began as an 1998 Specialized FSR bike frame and was custom built for my application, the complete bike cost me $200 CND. Converting to a solar ebike added an additional $500 to the cost.

    Several hardware designs are unique about this ebike, the custom freewheel crank consists of three sprockets, starting on the outside is the 80T (tooth) chain sprocket which the electric motor drives. Then behind the 80T sprocket is another sprocket 42T and behind this is another which is just 22T. The two sprockets rotate the rear wheel by regular bike chain, the smaller 22T sprocket has a top speed of 22 kph without any need to pedal by the operator. The larger 42T sprocket can achieve +40 kph or over 50 kph with operator providing pedal input. The kph previously noted are powered by a 24 volt battery pack, basically half the voltage required of most Ebikes found in 2011.
    http://www.solar-cross.thekpv.com/ 
    Like

  • Rahul
    Rahul -

    Eight students of Shri Shankarprasad Agnihotri College of Engineering, under the guidance of Prof Vikram Pakhale, have invented a hybrid solar tricycle !


    Gajanan Ayyar, one of the students, who developed this project, said, "The tricycle has configuration of 2 solar panel of 75 watt, solar charger, 2 battery of 12 volts, brush less DC motor, speed controller. The market price of this new equipment will be between Rs 20,000-25,000. 

    Another student Animesh Kundu, said, "When we visited Anandwan at Warora, we decided to make a vehicle which can run on solar energy. However, lots of people have worked on this theme but none of the models appeared with tricycle system, we have succeeded in turning the idea into reality."

    "While planning we realized that this was not a simple task since we had to prepare a system. After discussing with our professors, who taught us technical aspects of solar energy, we referred to a model of French scientist Venturi who made hybrid solar vehicle. Now we feel that we can use our knowledge for betterment of the physically-challenged persons," said Rahul Baghale, another student.http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-05-14/nagpur/31700536_1_solar-energy-tricycle-solar-charger


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In order to power the TV you need to do a little bit of cycling to get some power in the battery and then it will work whilst you pedal at a reasonable speed, In a hotel in UK
    http://www.gizmag.com/bicycle-powered-television/22497/ )
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Pedal-A-Watt. It converts your bicycle into a stationary bike and uses your pedal power to generate energy that can be stored in a power pack. An average rider can produce up to 200 watts – ride for an hour and you'll generate enough to power a 25 watt fluorescent light bulb for eight hours. 
    http://www.gizmag.com/the-pedal-a-watt-stationary-bike-power-generator-create-energy-and-get-fit/13433/ )
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    River Gym
    The name says it all. You pedal a bicycle in a boat and  the boat keeps moving.
    www.archinode.com/gym.html-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Like

  • Nitin
    Nitin -

    Audi Ebike is very popular in India. Lots of people are looking for it. Lots of people want to know where Audi Ebike is available. Many people in India want to know who the dealer or distributor for Audi E Bike is. In fact the urban rich want to know as to how much does Audi E bike costs and what its important features are .
    The young educated urban Indians would like to show off if they can buy an Audi E Bike.
    Here I have given lots of information about Audi E Bike and lots of pics too.


    Audi E Bike 
    Imagine a sophisticated bicycle that matches the speeds of a bike with just the press of a button. Well, your fantasy has now become a reality, thanks to an incredible new 
    e-bike by auto manufacturer Audi. 

    The new Audi e-bike Worthersee, built on motor racing design principles, has every possible gadget that you could ever need - just like a Formula 1 car. 
    Audi ebike video

    Perhaps the most helpful feature is an electric motor to help rest those tired legs of the rider. But this isn't just any electric motor, it can help build speeds up to 80 km per hour, the Daily Mail reported. 

    According to its developers, a cyclist can choose between a total of five modes, including the pure muscle power mode, the electric motor alone, or pedalling supported by the motor. 

    In the "Pure" mode, the drive power is purely the product of the cyclist's legs, while in "Pedelec" mode you are aided by the electric motor that then makes speeds of up to 50 mph. 

    If you select "eGrip", the Audi e-bike Worthersee runs solely on the electric motor and can reach a top speed of 31 mph. The cyclist then controls forward momentum using a gripshift and can configure the power as desired using the touchscreen on-bike computer. 

    The cyclist can also hook up to the computer using a smartphone. For those looking to record tricks, video images recorded via the in-helmet camera can be uploaded to the Internet in real time via your smartphone. Facebook status reports also pop up on the Audi e-bike Worthersee display. 

    Different modes can be set using a smartphone or directly on the e-bike - either "Power Wheelie" mode, with adjustable wheelie angle for less skilled bikers or "Balanced Wheelie" mode for sporting challenges. 

    It's also fitted with homogeneous LED light strips that create the immediately recognisable Audi light signature.


    Audi ebike video 


    This show bike is futuristic at the very first glance -- a bike for tomorrow and beyond. All its components, even the pedals, have been shaped by Audi's designers, for instance the 26-inch wheels made from CFRP that weigh only 600 grams (1.32 lb) each and have innovative large-area blade-pattern spokes.
     
    The Audi e-bike Wörthersee's ultra-light carbon-fiber frame weighs only 1,600 grams (3.53 lb). It makes use of bionic principles derived from nature. Material reinforcements are needed only at the points where loads actually occur. The swinging arm for the rear wheel is also made of CFRP. All in all, the Audi e-bike Wörthersee represents the full extent of the brand's expertise in ultra-lightweight design.

    The rear wheel is driven by a chain. The electric motor is a permanent magnet synchronous machine; it is located at the lowest point on the frame and drives the bottom bracket shaft directly. Maximum torque at the rear wheel is in the region of 250 Nm (184.39 lb-ft). Peak output from the electric motor is 2.3 kW -- a new top value on the e-bike scene. The complete bicycle weighs only 21 kg (46.30 lb), equivalent to a power-weight ratio of 9 kg (19.84 lb) per kilowatt, or 7 kg (15.43 lb) per horsepower -- another record-breaking value.

    The lithium-ion battery is housed in the frame; it weighs about 5 kg (11.02 lb) and operates at a voltage of 48 V. Its capacity is 530 Wh and it can be fully recharged from a 230 V supply in two and a half hours. As an alternative it can be easily detached from the bike and replaced by a recharged battery.

    More info: http://bit.ly/Jmxlx9





    Audi ebike video


    Audi e-bike Wörthersee: high-end sports equipment for stunts


    16 production Audi models on 3,500 square meters of stand area


    Audi is exhibiting concept vehicles for lifestyle, action and sport on the Wörthersee Tour. Three powerful versions provide new accents in the Q3 model family, and with its e-bike Wörthersee prototype Audi defines a technical bike concept that explores the limits of technical feasibility on the basis of Audi's core competences "design", "ultra", "connect" and "e-tron". This grand meeting of Audi, VW, Seat and Skoda fans is being held for the 31st time from May 16 to 19 in Reifnitz, on the Wörthersee in Carinthia, Austria.


    One of the highlights on the Audi stand is the bicycle technology concept known as the Audi e-bike Wörthersee -- a sport bike that does not fit into any of the usual categories. It is neither a pedelec nor a conventional bike, but is best described as a high-end pedelec made by Audi for sport, fun and tricks. The Audi e-bike Wörthersee combines the Audi brand's principal competences -- design, ultra, connect and e-tron -- and explores the limits of what is technically feasible in terms of design, lightweight construction, networking and electric mobility.


    This show bike is futuristic at the very first glance -- a bike for tomorrow and beyond. All its components, even the pedals, have been shaped by Audi's designers, for instance the 26-inch wheels made from CFRP that weigh only 600 grams (1.32 lb) each and have innovative large-area blade-pattern spokes.


    The Audi e-bike Wörthersee's ultra-light carbon-fiber frame weighs only 1,600 grams (3.53 lb). It makes use of bionic principles derived from nature. Material reinforcements are needed only at the points where loads actually occur. The swinging arm for the rear wheel is also made of CFRP. All in all, the Audi e-bike Wörthersee represents the full extent of the brand's expertise in ultra-lightweight design.


    The rear wheel is driven by a chain. The electric motor is a permanent magnet synchronous machine; it is located at the lowest point on the frame and drives the bottom bracket shaft directly. Maximum torque at the rear wheel is in the region of 250 Nm (184.39 lb-ft). Peak output from the electric motor is 2.3 kW -- a new top value on the e-bike scene. The complete bicycle weighs only 21 kg (46.30 lb), equivalent to a power-weight ratio of 9 kg (19.84 lb) per kilowatt, or 7 kg (15.43 lb) per horsepower -- another record-breaking value.


    The lithium-ion battery is housed in the frame; it weighs about 5 kg (11.02 lb) and operates at a voltage of 48 V. Its capacity is 530 Wh and it can be fully recharged from a 230 V supply in two and a half hours. As an alternative it can be easily detached from the bike and replaced by a recharged battery.


    The rider of the Audi e-bike Wörthersee can choose between five programs; these either support use of the pedals or permit electric-only travel.


    In the 'Pure' mode the rider only propels the bike by means of the pedals. In the 'Pedelec' mode the rider is assisted by the electric motor; a top speed of up to 80 km/h (50 mph) can be reached and the action radius is between 50 and 70 kilometers (31 and 44 miles). In the 'eGrip' program the Audi e-bike Wörthersee can be ridden with the electric motor providing all the necessary power; in this case at speeds up to 50 km/h (31 mph). The rider controls the power output from the electric motor at a twistgrip and can configure it at the on-board computer.

    In 'Wheelie' mode the power flow is electronically controlled in order to assist the rider when the front wheel is in the air. Alternative operating modes are available, and can be selected by smartphone or directly at the e-bike: either 'Power Wheelie' with an adjustable wheelie angle for less skilled riders, or 'Balanced Wheelie' for those with more experience. In the latter mode the rider's balance is maintained electronically: as his or her weight is displaced forward or back, this is counteracted by either braking or accelerating the electric motor.


    In this way the rider can influence the speed when riding on the rear wheel only by shifting his or her weight. Leaning forward speeds up the bike, leaning back slows it down. If the rider wants to use the pedals and maintain a constant power input, the training mode can be chosen. The electric motor then makes good the extra power needed when riding into the wind or up a hill, so that the rider's performance can be kept constant for training purposes.





    Automaker Audi (Reifnitz, Austria) on May 16 announced the launch of the Audi e-bike Wörthersee. The prototype cycle combines an electric drive and a carbon fiber frame.

    Head of design Wolfgang Egger comments, “As a high-performance e-bike for sports and trick cycling, it features the Audi core competences of design, ultra, e-tron and connect.” The Audi e-bike Wörthersee puts in its first major appearance at this year’s Wörthersee Tour, the 31st meet for Audi, VW, Seat and Skoda fans; trial biker Julien Dupont and downhill specialist Petra Bernhard will demonstrate their stunts and streetbike skills.

    “When developing the Audi e-bike Wörthersee we drew on motor racing design principles for inspiration,” explains Hendrik Schaefers, one of the designers at Concept Design Studio Munich. “The e-bike appears incredibly precise, highly emotional and strictly functional. Indeed, the design effort focused on its function as a sports machine. All design elements are thus firmly aligned to the technical features.”

    The frame features a low center of gravity and a compact overall volume. The lithium-ion battery is incorporated into the frame and requires 2.5 hours to fully charge. On long trial tours, only a few simple steps are required to remove the battery and replace it with a charged one.

    The frame and the swinging arm that holds the back wheel are made of carbon fiber composites. The same material is used for the 26-inch wheels, which feature an innovative “Audi ultra blade” design with broad flat spokes for an optimized transmission of pedal power. “We were able to demonstrate with the choice of materials just how closely design goes hand in hand with expertise in ultra lightweight construction,” Hendrik Schaefers comments.

    Homogeneous LED light strips round out the frame and create the immediately recognizable Audi light signature. For extreme tricks and stunts, the seat can be lowered to run flush with the frame itself. At the press of a button, the seat then rises up and the biker can adopt a comfortable position.

    Cycling modes and other functions can be set using the touchscreen on-bike computer. The cyclist’s smartphone hooks up by WLAN to the computer – when the rider starts cycling, for example, the immobilizer is deactivated. Video images of the trial drive or of a trick, as recorded via the in-helmet camera, are uploaded to the Internet in real time via smartphone. Each trick performed successfully is then awarded success points, and as the number of points awarded grows, the cyclist receives awards and the challenge level rises, too. The rankings table in the Internet means the rider can measure himself/herself against other bikers.

    Audi’s e-Bike is all about carbon fiber

    The cyclist can choose between a total of five cycling modes – pure muscle power, the electric motor alone, or pedaling supported by the electric motor. In the “Pure” mode, the drive power is purely the product of the cyclist’s legs, while in “Pedelec” mode the cyclist is supported by the electric motor that then makes speeds of up to 80 km/h (50 mph) possible and provides a range of 50 to 70 kilometers (31 to 44 miles).

    In “eGrip” mode, the Audi e-bike Wörthersee runs solely on the electric motor and can reach a top speed of 50 km/h (31 mph). The cyclist then controls forward momentum using a gripshift and can configure the power as desired using the computer.


    When performing wheelies, an electronic control system support the rider when performing tricks and back-wheel biking. Different modes can be set using a smartphone or directly on the e-bike – either “Power Wheelie” mode, with adjustable wheelie angle for less skilled bikers or “Balanced Wheelie” mode for sporting challenges. In “Balanced Wheelie” mode, the electronic control system maintains the rider’s balance, by compensating the biker’s movements forwards or backwards via the electric motor.


    The electric motor is located at the lowest point on the frame and drives the bottom bracket shaft directly. The maximum torque delivered to the rear wheel is 250 Nm (184.39 lb-ft). The electric motor generates a maximum output of 2.3 kW, a new world best for e-bikes. The complete bike excluding electrical components weighs in at 11 kg (24.25 lb), equivalent to a power-to-weight ratio of 9 kg (19.84 lb) per kilowatt, or 7 kg (15.43 lb) per horsepower – another record-breaking value. source 



    Like

  • Nitin
    Nitin -




    The trailers are for Music Of The Sun, a mobile, solar- and bicycle-powered outdoor improvisational ambient music series directed toward Minneapolis park and trail system users. Twice a month spring through early fall, The Eclectic Ensemble loads a PA system and instruments into custom-built bicycle trailers and pedal to Minneapolis parks and bike trails to perform for free to the public. Performances happen any time during daylight hours, last 45 to 90 minutes, and can occur on any day of the week.


    =====================================================



    When discussing “motorised” bicycles it is therefore important to distinguish between these two types before making sweeping statements. Online commentators also often equate the environmentally-friendly and slow electric bicycle with the noisy and dangerously fast, customised petrol-driven bikes. The huge difference between these two needs to be emphasised yet again.


    Even in India it needs to be resolved. License requirement for electric bicycles and motorized bicycles using IC engines.

    Electric bicycles are undergoing rapid development and are destined to become a popular means of transport. They have an important potential to make a significant contribution to clean, healthy mobility. Such bicycles are suited to the hilly conditions in Malta.

    The EU treats electric bicycles as normal bicycles in order to encourage electric bicycle use alongside normal bicycles both as a form of environmentally-clean mobility and as a means of relieving traffic congestion. As a consequence, the EU places no restrictions whatsoever on electric bicycles which conform to the adopted definition of “pedelec”. These are electric bicycles which are activated by pedalling and not by a handle-bar throttle or switch. These bicycles are also incapable of a speed greater than 25 km/h.


    Same regulations will work in INdia too. 25 km/h seems alright for bicycles in  India.

    By virtue of article 1 (h) of EU Directive 2002/24/EC such electric “pedelec” bicycles are regarded as “normal” bicycles because, unlike bicycles fitted with petrol engines, electrically assisted bicycles are incapable of high speeds. 


    In fact, one can pedal faster on the level than the electric motor will drive it. Moreover, electric bicycles handle exactly like normal bicycles because the motor provides only slight traction and the rider has to pedal to keep the bicycle in motion. The electric traction of a pedelec only becomes noticeable (and useful) when climbing hills because the rider is not unduly slowed down by having to ascend in low gear.


    But given the weather conditions, we need the battery operated bicycles to run at times on its own, without pedalling and at times faster.

    Finally, bicycle insurance or annual licensing is non-existent in countries where the bicycle is a major form of transport – as Denmark or Holland. The electric bicycle is also exempt in the hope that this will encourage its popularity as acceptable alternative method of commuting which can beat traffic jams and contribute to decreasing traffic congestion and pollution. Everything must therefore be done to encourage such forms of healthy transport. source


    =============================================


    EVs are one of the largest and fastest growing electric vehicle markets. A Light Electric Vehicle LEV is a land vehicle propelled by an electric motor that uses an energy storage device such as a battery or fuel cell, has two or three wheels, and typically weighs less than 100kg. Most LEVs are and will remain ebikes. These are Power on Demand bikes controlled with a throttle. A significant percentage of ebikes sold are scooters in that they have the driver's feet rest on a platform - they are not straddled by the driver. Today, the LEV industry is dominated by large bicycle companies, due to their access to distribution. We explain why, in the future, these companies will face major competition from, and may be pushed aside by car, motorcycle, and car parts companies. Supply chains for motors, batteries, chassis parts, and nearly every LEV component exist in Asia, primarily in China, Taiwan, Japan, and newly emerging South Korea. We reveal where the highest profits will be obtained in future and the opportunities in components as these change with lithium-ion batteries of several generations and supercapacitors being increasingly employed, for example. The more demanding future technical requirements of users and standards are investigated. Adjoining sectors are also discussed such as heavy electric motorcycles and the bigger sector of mobility vehicles for the disabled, where ten year forecasts are presented. New crossover vehicles between LEVs and these sectors are presented.Market Forecasts from IDTechExThis report includes forecasts for LEV numbers and market value from 2012 to 2022. LEV total global market value 2011-2022  Source:IDTechEx



    Shared Electric-Bicycles in Hilly Sanfrancisco 

    As awesome as the bike is as a way to get around, sometimes human muscles don't quite pack enough oomph to deal with hilly terrain. Tour de France cyclists might see steep inclines as a challenge, but my mother would welcome a little assistance... That's why it's such a great idea for San Francisco - far from a flat city - to add electric bikes to its City CarShare fleet (a local nonprofit).



    In essence, the goal is to find out how many car-share trips will be replaced with electric bicycle trips, and what factors influence the switch. City CarShare will receive $760,000 of the grant money, covering some 40 percent of the costs over three years for 90 e-bikes at about 25 locations.

    The organization plans to roll out 45 bikes in the second half of this year and 45 more by the end of 2013, mostly in San Francisco but in Berkeley as well.




    It's a great idea as long as the execution is good. People need to be made aware that these e-bikes are available (it would be even better if there was more of them, of course), and they need to be located within areas where they will be most useful. They also need to make sure that the batteries are always being charged when the bikes are back at the stations (or at least overnight). If all of that is done well, I think electric bikes will be a big hit in SF, and I hope they'll also be added to bike fleets in other cities (even cities in flatter landscapes could benefit from e-bikes). source 

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  • Nitin
    Nitin -


    Come July, 2012, 600 cycle stations will open for business across Manhattan and Brooklyn. New York bicycle hire works like London and Paris, but more expensiveA 30-minute trip is free for subscribers, but a 5-hour rental is $97.

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  • Nitin
    Nitin -

    Folding Electric Bicycle
    Sounds good for the indian market.Depends on the price.Depends on whether the battertry can b charged using solar energy.
    Want to get around in a green way? You can either ride on a bicycle, or get the job done using an electric bicycle. Of course, the latter will result in some sort of carbon emission somewhere (indirectly speaking, since the electricity required to charge it needs to come from somewhere, don’t you think so?), but at least it will help you tackle those steep mountains without missing a beat. Not only that, the name Folding Electric Bicycle does give the game away, where this $2,000 electric bicycle will be able to fold in half, making it perfect for commutes and storage at work or an apartment.
    It will be folded around its integrated battery compartment, where its front half collapses against its rear half, whereas its front unifork will fold into the frame, resulting in a compact 30″ x 18″ x 12″ shape. It can be deployed for riding in an instant, thanks to its silent 250-watt electric motor which will help you go uphill without breaking a sweat, or you can power across broad flats for smooth cruising on its 20″ tires at a top speed of up to 15 mph in full-power mode.
    The removable 24-volt rechargeable lithium battery comes with a 15-mile range, taking half a dozen hours to charge up. It is made out of aircraft aluminum frame, and can support riders of up to 250 lbs. Like

  • Nitin
    Nitin -

    http://www.coolest-gadgets.com/20120529/folding-electric-bicycle/
    I forgot to mention the url. Like

  • voorugonda
    voorugonda -

    please anyone can tell me where can i buy solar bicycle in india and estimated cost. Like

  • narsi
    narsi -

    I think solar bicycles are still a rarity anywhere in the world, so expect it to cost a bomb. It might be a lot easier for you to go for an electric bicycle not powered by solar but by normal grid...this could cost between 10-15 K...Pedelec from TI Cycles is selling in the range 7-12 K ( http://www.tiindia.com/article/investors/209 ) Like

  • anuragsaini
    anuragsaini -

    We are redesigning a e-bike for daily use. it will be very kind if u will help us by filling survey on this link . http://www.surveymethods.com/EndUser.aspx?7F5B372E7D342E287E Like

  • aligproducts
    aligproducts -

    Hi, Alig Products India is a supplier of solar products( MC4 /MC3 Connectors , LEDs) and equipments. We will be more than happy to associate with you. sales@aligproducts.in 917827024258 Like

  • shanks
    shanks -

    It is disgusting that we do not have a manufacturer of e bile kit of BLDC motor, controller, to manufacture a e bike. We need to get it from China and $$$ is toooo much. If you know someone please let me know. myshanks(at)g mail com Like

  • Genelia
    Genelia -

    I think your site is great ... it has been really useful in putting me in touch with manufacturer of e bilk who can help my business. thank you.
    _______________________
    http://www.netscribes.com/ Like

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