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Wind Policy of TN, Wind energy Farms, incentives for Wind Power in TAMIL NADU, wind energy tamilnadu, wind energy loans in tamilnadu, wind energy locations in tn,

 *CEA DEMANDS BETTER FORECASTING TOOLS FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY

 

The Central Electricity Authority () has made a strong case that state-of-the-art forecasting tools be provided in the  (RE) rich states such as Gujarat, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and Rajasthan to improve the forecast quality for maintaining the load generation balance.    CEA has also suggested that technical and regulatory measures be enhanced for the flexibility of conventional generation to increase the balancing capacity of the grid.    It is necessary that healthiness of grid protection schemes through regular monitoring and updating is ensured. The trigger is capacity addition o 32,000 MW proposed through RE  while around 88,537 MW from conventional generation during 12th plan.more..    

 


 

 

*DAY-AHEAD FORECAST FOR WIND POWER PRODUCERS TO BE REVIEWED : CERC     The need for prediction of power production is genuine, it is not practicable as of now.That is why there are so many cases against such an order by CERC. Anyway it is good news for the industry.

Following opposition from various wind power producers lobbies, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission (CERC), the apex electricity regulator, would review its regulation on day-ahead forecast by wind power producers.

The CERC order has been challenged in three high courts of the country by three different organisations. Indian wind power association (IWPA) has filed an injunction against the regulation in Delhi High Court, Wind Independent Power Producers' Association (WIPPA) in Madras High Court and a recent addition, Gujarat Mineral Development Corporation(GMDC) in Ahmedabad High Court. Wind power producers have challenged the regulation on grounds of both feasibility and legality. Some power producers have also questioned the preparedness of the national grid to handle modern data collection technology.  more...

 


 

The wind energy sector could breathe some fresh air with more venture capital funding available in the third quarter of 2012 versus the second quarter. However, mergers and acquisitions in the segment saw a drop.

After a weak second quarter of 2012, the sector saw a positive investment trend in the third quarter attracting $57 million in funding in six deals ($17 million in three deals in the second quarter), says a report by Mercom Capital Group llc, a global clean energy communications and consulting firm. The report deals with funding and merger and acquisition activity in the wind sector during the third quarter of 2012.

Source

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Wind focus now shifting from TN to Guj and Maha

Tamil Nadu, country's hub for wind farms, now started loosing to the near by states in South and to Gujarat. The state which attracted around Rs 7,000 crore investment a year before is likely to close the current fiscal with an investment of only around Rs 1,300 crore, a drop of around 81 per cent.

Industry representatives attributed the drop to state utility defaulting to the wind farm owners, unfriendly policy and lack of infrastructure.Ramesh Kymal, chairman, Indian Wind Turbine Manufacturers Association and Chairman and Managing Director Gamesa said that "compared to more than 1000 MW last year, we have done only 150 MW in the first half. And I can assure u between now and march we will have another 50 MW".

 "So about 1100  MW , we are talking about Rs 7,000 crore investment made in Tamil Nadu last year and this year only 200  MW  is going to come which is only Rs 1300 crore." he said.

It may be noted, the state has been the darling for wind energy companies as the availability of huge wind corridors with good wind velocity has been attracting investors to Tamil Nadu for more than a decade. The state, with an installed capacity of 7,000 MW, has the highest number of windmills in the country.

But the investment direction is now getting changed towards Karnataka, Gujarat and Maharastra. Industry representatives said, apart from huge sum of money (to the tune of around Rs 1,500), which has to be owed by Tami Nadu Electricity Board to the wind energy producers, adverse policies and tariff are also hurting the investors sentiment.

“Investors have lost interest in the state, as the charge, dubbed cross-subsidy charge of about Rs 1.30 per kWhr, makes investments in wind project unviable” said an industry representative.

A TNEB official said the Board is facing fund constrains, with the recent Government decision to infuse money into the Board and to provide guarantee, the Board will be able to raise money from the financial institution and soon it will pay the money to the wind farm owners.

The other major problem is infrastructure, The state-run distribution company is yet to come out with a concrete plan of action for establishing sub-stations along with private sectors, which will attract another 1,000 MW of wind power in the region.

With these issues, wind power players are looking at other states like Karnataka, Maharashtra, Rajasthan and Gujarat as alternate investment ground, which will not augur well for state that is facing power shortage of around 4000 mega watt.

Source

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Wind energy equipment manufacturers hope the government would put policies for incentives to enable the wind energy generation industry to reach its potential.

Absence of proper incentives -- including the proposed generation-based incentive (GBI) and accelerated depreciation benefits, which were earlier enjoyed by the industry -- had hit the industry hard, said Ramesh Kymal, chairman, Indian Wind Turbine Manufacturers Association (IWTMA).

Source

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a very recent development has brought fresh cheer to the Wind industry—the possibility of reinstatement of the other benefit, viz., accelerated depreciation.

 

This is said to be due to the efforts of the Indian Wind Power Association. The Association’s Chairman, K Kasturirangan, met the Union Finance Minister, P Chidambaram, a few days back in Coimbatore, to follow up on his own previous presentation to the Ministry of Finance.

“I am confident that the Government will bring back accelerated depreciation,” Kasturirangan told Business Line today. The Indian Wind Power Association has 1,500 members.

 

Dr K Venkatachalam, Chief Advisor, Tamil Nadu Spinning Mills Association (TASMA) fully shares Kasturirangan’s optimism. Recently, when asked if TASMA members would look at solar power projects with accelerated depreciation in mind, he said that he was confident that AD would be given for wind projects also. 

source

 

 

TN takes wind out of power biz

Producers Move Out Citing Transmission, Capacity Woes

Sushma U N TNN 


Chennai: At a time when Tamil Nadu is grappling with an acute power situation, the state’s policy on wind energy is driving investors to other states. Several companies like Orient Green Power Ltd (OGPL), Techno Electric and Gamesa, which have brought substantial wind investments to Tamil Nadu, are applying the brakes on their investment plans and are taking their windmills to Karnataka, Rajasthan and Maharashtra. 
    Tamil Nadu, which has 40% of the country’s wind generating capacity, added only 150MW this half year and will augment 50MW more by yearend, compared to the 1,100MW it added last year, said Wind Turbine Manufacturers Association chairman Ramesh Kymal. With the significant dip in capacity additions comes the uncertainty in businesses of biggies like Vestas and Suzlon. 
    Vestas has not officially confirmed about exiting India operations, but it is scaling down investments here. Suzlon is almost pushed to a position where it has no choice but to reduce its production levels. Inadequacy of grid capacity to evacuate and transmit the power generated has proved the biggest problem for the industry. 
    “There are not enough transmission lines, and the existing grids don’t have the capacity to transmit the power from south Tamil Nadu to consumers in the northern parts of the state,” said OGPL managing director P Krishnakumar. OGPL is now focusing on Andhra Pradesh and Gujarat, and won’t be making any investments in Tamil Nadu for another two years, Krishnakumar said. 
    The increase in power tariff by 12 paise to Rs 2.51 a unit is also a reason for investors pulling out of Tamil Nadu. “There was a hike in tariff, but it wasn’t attractive enough for us,” Krishnakumar said. States like Maharashtra and Karnataka are luring investors with tariffs such as Rs 5.50 and Rs 4 respectively. Kymal said the introduction of transmission charges for captive investors (companies which generate power and consume it themselves) has also driven away investors. 
    “Also, the electricity board has not been making payments to power suppliers on time for about a year now, because of which banks don’t lend to companies” he said. Adding to their woes is the introduction of cross subsidy charges, which is levied by the state electricity distribution company on the industrial consumer to make good the loss incurred due to power subsidy. “The challenges will remain, and we might look at coming back to Tamil Nadu by May 2014, but not earlier,” Krishnakumar said. Kymal, who is also Gamesa MD, said, “We are moving to Maharashtra, Rajasthan and Karnataka since the electricity boards there make payments on time and tariffs are attractive there,” he said. 
    Tweaking the policies to benefit all parties and repowering existing plants rather than only focus on new investments could help the industry, say experts. “With some of the best wind sites in Tamil Nadu that now have very old turbines, the state offers potential for repowering (replacing older, lower capacity less efficient machines with the latest technology machines). If such a policy were to be introduced, Tamil Nadu is likely to be an attractive destination,” an industry expert and the founder of Panchabuta a renewable energy focused newsletter, Vineeth Vijayaraghavan said. source

 

 

* Vestas to scale down indian operations

Vestas, the world’s biggest wind turbine manufacturer, has decided to “scale down its sales efforts in the Indian market’’.

Business Line had heard rumours that the Danish multinational was closing down its India operations and sent an email query.

In response to the query, Mikkel Friis-Thomsen, Communication Partner, Media & External Relations, Vestas Wind Systems A/S, said that the global wind energy market is in a “challenging situation right now’’.

As a consequence, Vestas is currently implementing a global re-organisation plan to develop a “more scalable and flexible organisation” and cut cost by €250 million by the end of 2012.

Consequent to its efforts to “re-establish a more efficient and profitable business”, the company is “re-evaluating its current business set-up and approach in India’’.

Therefore, “Vestas has decided to scale down its sales efforts in the Indian market to focus on providing value-added service and maintenance to existing Indian wind power plants,” Friss-Thomsen said.

“Vestas will adjust the number of employees to match the reduced business scope,” he has said in the email.

 

One of the earliest

Vestas was one of the earliest wind turbine manufacturers to set up shop in India. It came into India in collaboration with RRB. Vestas-RRB was a well known brand in the mid-1990s and was the second highest selling turbine after NEPC Micon, which was a joint venture between NEG Micon of Denmark and the NEPC group.

In 1996, NEG was taken over by Vestas in Europe consequent to which the partners of NEPC Micon had to split up. NEG was on its own in India, as a subsidiary of Vestas, even though Vestas was present also through Vestas RRB.

In 2004, the partners of Vestas-RRB decided to part ways. Vestas was on its own and all the operations of NEG were subsumed under Vestas.

Vestas today has about 3,000 MW of standing machines.

According to Mr Ramesh Kymal, who headed Vestas for many years—he now heads Vestas’ competitor, Gamesa India—the Danish company’s business model was not appropriate for India, as it refused to do the “project development work”—such as buying and developing land and putting the transmission infrastructure.

Also, Vestas India had to report into Singapore, rather than Denmark, and as such those in Denmark were not fully aware of the realities in India, Mr Kymal told Business Line today.

Vineeth Vijayaraghavan, Founder-Editor of the online newsletter, Panchabuta, says that the Indian wind energy market is “shifting to a smaller number of customers and larger size of wind farms”. Against this new backdrop, “Vestas's approach on scaling down sales force and focusing on value added service and maintenance is the best approach given that they do not do project development in India," Vineeth said. source

 

 

* Rs 3.51 

 

The Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission (TNERC) has passed its tariff order hiking the tariff for wind power producers in the State to Rs 3.51 a unit.

Windmills installed between August 1, 2012, and July 31, 2014, will be able to sell the power they generate to the State electricity distribution company, TANGEDCO, at this tariff.

Windmills commissioned prior to May 15, 2006, shall be eligible for a tariff of Rs 2.75 a kWhr. Those commissioned between May 15, 2006, and September 18, 2008, will get Rs 2.90 per unit. Those commissioned between September 19, 2008, and July 31, 2012, will get Rs 3.39 per unit.

The Commission has not accepted the plea of many to make the tariff applicable retrospectively from April 1, 2011. The previous ‘control period’ had ended on March 31, 2011, but the period got extended thrice, and finally the new tariff order was issued. ource 3/8/12

 

& Rs 3.51 inadequate : TASMA

 

The wind tariff order issued today by the Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission has made investments in the wind power sector in Tamil Nadu unviable, say industry leaders.

After a detailed calculation, the Tamilnadu Spinning Mills Association (TASMA), whose members own over 3,000 MW of wind power capacity, has concluded that the captive consumers are put to an additional expense of 95 paise per unit.

“This makes it fully unviable to invest in the wind energy sector any more,” K Venkatachalam, Chief Advisor, TASMA, has said in a note to the Association’s members.

 

 

Expressing similar views, Ramesh Kymal, Chairman, Indian Wind Turbine Manufacturers’ Association (IWTMA), and Chairman and Managing Director, Gamesa India Pvt Ltd, described the order as “a retrograde step.”

 

He observed that while the tariff had been raised by 12 paise, the additional burden arising out of various other charges works out to about a rupee.

 

Recalling that the Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu, J Jayalalithaa, had envisioned creation of additional 6,000 MW of capacity in the state in the 12th Plan, Kymal said, “That is not going to happen.”

 

“We were hoping that we would get at least the CERC(-norms based order),” he said. CERC-norms based tariff would fetch between Rs 4.20 and Rs 4.50 a unit. source

 

Wind Energy

 

India has the fifth largest installed wind power capacity in the world. Wind power accounts for 8% of India's total installed power capacity.

 

Wind power can be broadly categorized into onshore and offshore wind power. India is yet to exploit any offshore wind resources.

 

Total available potential

While the official estimates at the local level put the total potential at 102,000 MW, a new Lawrence Berkeley study estimates that the potential is in the order of 2,000,000 MW. This higher potential is owing to higher available percentage of windy land for wind power development than was originally considered.

 

Exploited potential

Total installed capacity is 17,644 MW (Jul 2012)

Projected capacity

Estimates from the EAI Wind Research team project India having a total wind installed capacity of over 33,000 MW by 2020, implying an addition of about 2000 MW on average every year until 2020. This drop from previous estimates is due to the removal of Accelerated Depreciation and Generation Based Incentives.

 

Government incentives

Feed-in-tariffs are available for wind for each state; these range from Rs. 3.39 to just under Rs. 5/kWh. Generation based incentives of Rs 0.50/kWh which were available earlier have lapsed but are expected to be renewed in the near future.

 

Investments

 

 

Challenges

üIncentive Challenges – FiT needs to be wind zone based, not state based

üTransmission Challenges – connectivity to grid and evacuation infrastructure is poor

üEfficiency Challenges – small wind efficiency low; efficiency of MW wind varies significantly from one location to another

 

Cost of power generation

Rs. 2.75-3.5/kWh – this includes amortized capital costs, O&M expenses, insurance, and loan repayment costs.

 

 

Tamil Nadu's first wind energy plant now lies abandoned 7/7/12

Wind energy cuts outages in Tamil Nadu 4/7/12

This blog like is written like how others write in eai club. All the latest news will be at the top. As time passes by, old news will get deleted/ minimised and the latest news will be given prominence. Below and in comments you will find all relevant information about tamilnadu wind policy, wind energy loans, wind energy locations in tamilnadu, wind power purchase terms in tamil nadu etc.,

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Latest Latest News Tamilnadu wind energy 

*JUNE 20: 

Wind energy banking : the isssue

Wind power producers in Tamil Nadu have strongly denied that the state-owned power utility, Tamil Nadu Generation and Distribution Company, is losing around Rs 1,200 crore because of the wind power sector in the State.

In its response to Tangedco’s view, the Tamilnadu Spinning Mills Association (TASMA) — whose members have over 3,000 MW of wind power capacity — has told the Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission (TNERC), that the wind power producers are not responsible for Tangedco’s losses.

Tangedco had said – both to TNERC and to Business Line – that the ‘banking facility’ allowed to captive wind power producers caused a huge loss to the state utility.

‘Banking’ enables a wind power producer to put in electricity into the grid and draw it back at a time of his choice within the end of that financial year. Tangedco believes that due to the difference in price they pay the producers and the price at which they have to procure from the market to supply back to them, it sustains a huge financial loss.

Wind power producers disagree. In a written counter submitted to the regulator, TASMA has noted that during high wind seasons, Tangedco actually makes a profit on trading in wind power.

TASMA reasons that even assuming that Tangedco purchased power from the market – for the purpose of supplying to the captive wind power companies that had ‘banked’ their power – even at a high price of Rs 10 a unit, the utility should have bought 1,200 million units to have made a loss of Rs 1,200 crore. In no year have the wind power producers banked as much as 1,200 million units, TASMA says, backing its stand with data.

Hence, it has to be taken that “the purchase made at Rs 10 a unit was to offer power to all consumers and not to wind power producers alone,” says TASMA.

The wind power producers (and the biomass power producers) are unhappy with Tangedco that the utility collects ‘infrastructure development charges’ on the one hand, and does not make the grid available all the time.

mramesh@thehindu.co.in

http://www.eai.in/360/actionbar/news/5538

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As Tamil Nadu hosts some of the oldest turbines in India, it has significant

potential for repowering. However, TNEB’s insistence on continuing with the old tariff and the existing name plate capacity is literally precluding repowering possibility for all sites, including those that may have additional capacity in evacuation infrastructure. Repowering, if adopted, can be a win-win formula for all. While it will mean monetary benefits to the investors, it will also mean better land utilization and high-quality generation, as the new machines would have more grid-friendly features than the old machines do. TNEB should initiate necessary measures for supporting repowering on a large scale.

3/8/12=========================================================================

 

 

*The Tamil Nadu Generation and Distribution Company (TANGEDCO), which is the state electricity generation and distribution utility, on Friday made a plea before the Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission for abolishing the system of 'banking' of electricity by wind power producers.

The 'banking' system allows wind power producers to put power into the grid and draw the power back for consumption within a year. This is particularly useful for wind power producers who also own other industries that may need electricity to run.

"Banking has to be totally withdrawn," said Mr G Rajagopal, Director-Finance, TANGEDCO, in a public hearing organised by the TNERC for the purpose of 'determination of tariff and allied issues in non conventional energy sources.'

TANGEDCO's plea was that banking was hurting the organisation because wind power producers put electricity into the grid when there is enough power - they are paid Rs 3.39 a unit - but exercise their option to draw power when there is a scarcity of power. As TANGEDCO is bound to supply them the power, it has to purchase power at high rates from the market for that purpose. In the bargain, TANGEDCO makes a loss. Furthermore, it has to supply power to the wind producers (who had 'banked' the power) in preference to other consumers.

In the public hearing, TANGEDCO's officials were supported by a number of sympathisers who said that it was unfair that TANGEDCO was made to suffer a loss at so that the wind power producers may be favoured.

Wind power producers, on the other hand, said that the facility of 'banking' was a promise made by TANGEDCO on the basis of which heavy investments have been made. Withdrawing the promised facilitiy would tantamount to breach of agreement, they said.

There was also a variance of views on the point of what the cost of capital should be and whether or not the tariff should be a fixed one, or determined through a process of competitive bidding.

Wind power developers said that the cost of wind turbines had gone up to between Rs 6 crore and Rs 7 crore, compared with the normative cost of Rs 5.35 crore on the basis of which the current tariff had been fixed. Others opposed this saying that there was no reason why the cost of a wind turbine should be so substantially higher than the cost of equipment of, say, thermal power, which is anyway more complex machinery. They said that the cost of a wind turbine should be taken at around Rs 4.5 crore.

Wind power producers also wanted the plant load factor to be brought down from the current normative rate of 27.15 per cent, to perhaps around 25 per cent. One speaker said that the TNERC itself had assumed a PLF of 19.5 per cent while determining the tariff to be charged by TANGEDCO to consumers. Therefore, he said, the normative PLF should be 19.5.

The wind farm developers were also against the idea of tariff determination by competitive bidding. A representative of South India Mills Association said that competitive bidding was okay at a time when the southern grid would be completely integrated with the national grid. (Today, all the other four zones are fully integrated while the southern grid is not linked with the all the rest, but the national plan is to link up south with the national grid by 2014.)

The SIMA representative said that if a wind power producer could sell his power to any customer anywhere in the country, then 'competitive bidding' made sense, but not till then. A representative of Indian Wind Turbine Manufacturers' Association noted that 64 per cent of the global wind capacity of 191 GW was under fixed, feed-in tariffs.

===============================================================

 

There are about 13400 MW of project applications

pending with TNEB. The main reason for delay in approvals seems to be the inadequacy of the existing

infrastructure to evacuate the proposed power. Prolonged delays in project approvals is one of the

biggest impediments to accelerated wind deployment. Urgent and effective actions are needed to grant

express approvals to pending projects.

3/8/12=======================================================================

 

*Tamil Nadu government offers interest-free loan to promote wind power units
Seeking to attract more private players in wind power generation, the state government has said that it would provide interest-free loans for five years to new entrants.

"The government is keen on more private companies producing electricity from wind power... We are ready to provide interest-free loan for five years to those who want to set up the wind power units," Electricity Minister Natham R Viswanathan told the Assembly.

Replying to a Special Call Attention motion moved by the Left parties, he said that the private companies were already producing electricity in their wind farms which have capacities of 440 KiloWatts (KW) and 230 KW. While TANGEDCO was opposed to raising the 'feed-in' tariff beyond the current Rs 3.39, wind power producers' demanded higher rates. Dr K Venkatachalam of Tamil Nadu Spinning Mills Association (TASMA) wanted Rs 5.32 a unit, another speaker wanted Rs 6.40.

source

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Load flow studies of 2011/12 conditions indicate that a large

number of 100 kV and 220 kV lines get loaded beyond their thermal limit during the high-wind season.

While the long-term solution is to create new grid infrastructure and connect large wind capacities at 400 kV level, short-term measures like replacing standard conductors with HTLS conductors and changing single circuit lines to double circuit lines may help immensely. This modification can be done for the  highly loaded lines and will require smaller investments than those for installation of new capacities

3/8/12

========================================================================

 

 

Payment delay to wind farm owners, majority of whom have not been paid for last one year of generation. This nonpayment is severely affecting the capabilities of IPP players, some of whom have no alternative sources of income to even meet their debt obligation. This has curtailed IPP investments in Tamil Nadu. To build investor confidence and push development, immediate measures are needed to pay the pending balance over a committed time limit.

3/8/12======================================================================

 

 

 

The Tamil Nadu Generation and Distribution Company (Tangedco), the State power utility, argued against escalation of power tariff for wind energy and doing away with concessions and benefits to the sector.

At a stakeholders meeting organised by the Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission, the statutory regulator, for considering their views on revision of power tariff for wind, biomass and bagasse-based cogeneration plants, the representatives from the utility argued against extension of preferential tariffs.

Industry representatives across sectors pushed for a hike in tariff in line with the escalating costs. They were also critical of the delay in payments which ranged from several months to over a year.

Senior officials of the utility pointed to the poor financial condition of the utility and its inability to pay higher tariffs. Even a small hike could affect the operations of the utility. Also, though wind energy has helped address the shortage of power in the State, the utility cannot afford to continue with the ‘promotional tariff' simply because it was from a renewable source.

According to official estimates, the State power utility is losing over Rs 9,741 crore a year, its accumulated losses as of March 2012 was Rs 50,000 crore, it owes Rs 45,000 crore to banks and lenders and over Rs 11,000 crore to suppliers and power companies.

WIND ENERGY

The officials said incentives to renewable energy had contributed to the installed capacity of wind energy reaching 7,000 MW, which was nearly 70 per cent as compared with the total installed capacity to conventional power plants.

The prevailing tariff, the price per unit of electricity, that the utility pays wind energy producers ranges from Rs 2.75 a unit to Rs 3.39 depending on the vintage of the wind mills.

Investors in wind energy pushed for a uniform tariff of Rs 5.32 a unit irrespective of age of wind mills. The proposed tariff should take effect from the April 2011, they said. The period of the previous tariff order announced by the Regulator in 2009 ended in March 2011.

The representatives included wind energy equipment manufacturers such as Vestas and Suzlon, associations such as the Indian Wind Energy Association, Indian Wind Turbine Manufacturers Association, and investors from the textile industry including individual mills and industry associations such as the South Indian Mills Association and the Tamil Nadu Spinning Mills Association.

The industry representatives said the capital costs have increased to over Rs 6.5 crore a MW from about Rs 5.35 crore at the time the previous tariff had been set. Increase in land costs, material costs and taxes have contributed to the increase they said.

BAGASSE COGENERATION

The South Indian Sugar Mills Association – Tamil Nadu representing the bagasse-based cogeneration plants sought an appropriate hike in line with the increase in investment costs. It now ranges around Rs 6 crore a MW as compared with Rs 4.9 crore estimated at the time of previous fixation when the tariff was pegged at Rs 3.15-Rs 4.49 a unit. more 

 

 

 

Twelfth National Training Course

WIND ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

Specially for Students 

18th to 20th July 2012


 

THE PROGRAMME

The total course duration is three days from 18th to 20th July 2012 encompassing presentations, lectures with case studies, success stories and exercises. The training course timing will be from 09.00 am to 06.00 pm.

 COURSE OUTLINE

 

  • Wind energy conversion technology and power generation

  • Wind turbine technology developments

  • Wind resources assessment and techniques

  • Planning including design of wind farms

  • Design of wind turbine

  • Wind turbine components and performance characteristics

  • Control system engineering

  • Feasibility study & technology assessment of wind farms

  • Cost benefit analysis of wind energy projects

  • Installation and commissioning of wind farms

  • Post installation activities - grid integration

  • & M aspects of wind farms

  • Testing & Certification of wind turbines

  • Small wind turbine and hybrid systems

  • Indian government policies, schemes and legal frameworks

  • Wind energy developments in India

  • CDM related to wind energy development

 

source

 

 Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-Wet), an autonomous R&D institution under the renewable energy ministry, has launched another phase of its wind assessment project. This phase of the project will measure the potential of wind energy at a height of 100 meters in 75 locations and at 120 meters height in 4 locations.

"The technology of megawatt class wind turbine has been changing all over the world. Anticipating taller towers with larger diameter rotors in the Indian market, we have now extended our assessment at greater heights in different areas to harness the potential of wind energy with the latest technology in India," said DrS Gomathinayagam, executive director, C-Wet.

 

This phase will also look for land availability through Geographical Information System along with a 'land-use land-cover' map, indicating the type of land cover which provides easy access to the wind power producers. It will also mark suitable land areas that are available for wind farming, using geographical instruments and applications like 'Google maps'.

Currently, the project operates in 7 states -- Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh, while there's a separate project for Odisha.

This project would calculate the potential of only on-shore wind sites. For offshore, however, there is one project in Tamil Nadu near Rameshwaram, measuring the wind energy potential at 100-meter height.

The Centre believes that this will attract a lot of new engineering, procurement & construction players and independent power producers in the wind energy sector. "This project will give direction to the industry and guide investors, policy makers and the government. Wind turbine manufacturers and power producers will have prior knowledge about the land, indicative wind at heights, hence helping them to choose a suitable technology," said Gomathinayagam. more 

 

 

 

 

Tamil nadu Wind Energy

The wind installed capacity of the state is 6548  as on 31.10.2011. This is 47% of the country’s total wind installed capacity.

Tamil Nadu is endowed with three prominent passes having high wind potential, due to the tunneling effect during south West Monsoon.

Sl.No

Name of the Pass/Districts

Annual average Wind Speed (Km/hour)

1     

Palghat Pass, Coimbatore, Erode

18-22

2

Shencottah Pass, Tirunelveli, Tuticorin

18-22

3

Aralvoimozhi Pass, Kanyakumari

19-25

4 Kambam Pass , Dindigul district 19-25

Kambam Pass in Dindigul District has been identified as wind potential area in the recent past.

 

Tamilnadu Wind power resource map

 

 Tamil Nadu Wind Energy Resource Map, identifying wind speed for wind power generation

 

 

 

 

 


State-Wise Cumulative Wind Generation Data in (BU)

(As on 31.01.2011)

 

S. No. Name of the State Upto 2005 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Up to Jan. 2011 Cumu-lative
               
1 Andhra Pradesh 0.721 0.079 0.111 0.101 0.333 .106 .067 1.518
2 Gujarat 1.332 0.286 0.455 0.851 2.104 2.988 2.309 10.325
3 Karnataka 1.409 0.935 1.397 1.840 1.723 2.895 2.362 12.561
4 Kerala 0.047 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 .065 .059 0.171
5 Madhya Pradesh 0.300 0.030 0.070 0.069 0.003 .082 .039 0.593
6 Maharashtra 2.650 0.790 1.714 1.804 2.207 2.778 2.368 14.311
7 Rajasthan 0.494 0.427 0.532 0.682 0.758 1.127 1.049 5.069
8 Tamil Nadu 11.970 3.444 5.268 6.066 6.206 8.146 8.017 49.117
  Total 18.925 5.991 9.547 11.413 13.334 18.187 16.270 93.665

 

 

 

* Spanish wind-turbine major Gamesa Corporacion Tecnologica SA, which has commissioned two repowering projects in India, believes it now has the demonstration capability to sell the concept of replacing old windmills with the more efficient new ones.

At Aaralvoimozhi in southern Tamil Nadu, Gamesa Wind Turbines Pvt Ltd recently completed replacing 11 old wind mills of 225 kW capacity each, with three of its own 850-kW machines. The capacity remains roughly the same, but the new machines, with their ability to rotate even in low-wind speeds, are up longer, generating more electricity.

 

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/companies/article2447359.ece

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wind Energy

Installed Capacity per state (MW)

State March 2011

March 2010

March 2009

March 2008

March 2007

March 2006

Tamilnadu 5904.4 4907 4304.5 3873.4 3492.7 2894.6
Karnataka 1730 1473 1327.4

1011.4

821.1

584.5

Maharashtra 2310.8 2078 1938.9

1755.9

1487.7

1001.3
Rajasthan 1524.8 1088 738.4

538.8

469.8

358.1

Andhra Pradesh 200.2 236 122.5

122.5

122.5

121.1
Madhya Pradesh 275.5 229 212.8 187.7

57.3

40.3
Kerala 32.8 28 27.0 10.5

2

2
Gujarat 2175.5 1864 1566.5 1252.9

636.6

338

Others 0 4 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1
Total 14158 11807 10242.3 8754.0

7090.8

5341

 

 

 

 

List of the 9 zones present in the database:

ND: unclassified

 

Update for this sheet: 05/2012

 

 

The 30 largest wind power capacities

 

Wind Policy of TN, Wind energy Farms, Wind Turbine Projects of India, incentives for Wind Power in TAMIL NADU

The world and India is looking for cheap clean energy to meet all its requirements. Well as Bob Dylan said,’the answer my friend is blowing in the wind’ Indian wind power potential is 49,130 MW  and The Indian wind energy sector has an installed capacity of 14158.00 MW (as on March 31, 2011). In terms of wind power installed capacity, India is ranked 5th in the World. Today India is a major player in the global wind energy market.

 

wind farm in rural india

Wind has considerable potential as a global clean energy source being both widely available, though diffuse, and producing no pollution during power generation. Tamilnadu the southernmost state in India has been in the forefront of wind energy thanks to its geographical layout.Installed wind power capacity in Tamilnadu stands at 6,067MW, which is about 43 percent of the capacity available in India.

Tamil Nadu is endowed with three lengthy mountain ranges on the Western side with potential of 1650 MW in palghat pass in Coimbatore District, 1300 MW in Shengottai pass in Tirunelveli District and 2100 MW in Arelvaymozhi pass in Kanniyakumari District and 450 MW in other areas totaling 5500 MW.

There are 41 Wind potential sites in 8 Districts in the State, declared by MNRE, as suitable for Wind Power projects based on the Wind assessment studies carried out by TEDA with the funding assistance of MNRE and the State Government.  Wind farms have so far been set up in 26 sites of the above, almost entirely by the private sector, except for 19 MW of Demonstration Wind farms in 8 locations set up during 1986 to 1993, jointly by TEDA and TNEB, but now run and maintained by TNEB. The total installed Capacity of Wind Mills in the State including the 19 MW under public sector is 3475 MW (7349 Machines) as on 31.3.2007. The addition made during the year 2007-08 is 236 MW as on 29.02.2008. The capacity addition made during the 10th Five year Plan (2002-07) is given below:

The total units generated from wind are 20682 million units (cumulative) as on 31.3.2007 and for the year 2006-07 it was 5269 million units which is 8.5% of Tamil Nadu’s grid consumption. In recognition of Tamil Nadu’s commendable achievement in Wind power generation, the State was awarded the First prize for Wind power programme (2002-2007). The award was presented during the Silver Jubilee Function of MNRE by Tmt. Pratibha Devisingh Patil, Hon’ble President of India on 22.11.2007. Further for the first time in the country, a village Panchayat Odanthurai in Coimbatore District, has set up a wind mill of 350 Kw capacity exporting power to grid, which was commissioned on 31.3.2006.

Incentives/Concessions

A package of incentives which includes fiscal concessions, custom duty, excise duty exemption and 10 year tax holiday are available for Wind Power projects from Govt. of India.

 Intra State open access regulations have been notified and preferential tariff orders issued for Wind Power Projects in Tamil Nadu by the Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission (TNERC). As per the revised tariff orders issued in May 2006, the rate is Rs.2.75 per unit for the projects for which agreements had already been signed and Rs.2.90 per unit where the agreements are to be signed. The wheeling and banking charges remain unchanged at 5% each. The new unit rates have now come into effect as per the TNEB order dt.14.9.2007.

Hurdles in Execution

Wind power producers seek Rs 1200 crores dues from TNEB. The Indian Wind Power Association, which has 1100 members, has written to the PM on this...The TN Distribution Generation and Disrtibution Corp has not paid them since Apr 2010, according to reports! In addition, the letter to the PM said that over 1000 MW of wind power has been installed in TN in 2010, much has remained idle as they are not evacuated owing to the lack of 230 KV and 400 KV sub-stations...

http://www.eai.in/club/users/amsapna/blogs/tags/wind_energy_in_Tamilnadu

Feasibility Study for wind energy

Wind resource assessment studies were carried out in 69 Wind prone Zones by setting up Wind monitoring stations since 1986, out of which 41 sites having annual mean wind speed of 18 KM per hour and above and annual mean Wind power density of 150/200 W/m2  and above at 30 m/50m level, have been declared by MNRE as potential and viable for commercial projects.

Windmills have so far come up in 26 sites. 9 new wind-monitoring stations are under installation through C-WET a Govt. of India undertaking (one completed) in various Districts with 20% cost sanctioned by the State Govt. and balance 80% cost provided by MNRE to C-WET. Further Micro survey of Wind resource, around select potential stations has been carried out to provide reliable data to wind farm developers for selecting proper location for Windmills in potential areas. Apart from 19 stations where the study was carried out with MNRE funding, the study was done in 8 more stations by C-WET with State funding. The total potential in the 27 stations as per the above study is 6385 MW.

Apart from MW scale wind mill generators (grid connected), stand alone type generators upto 30 KW rating are also available. Wind mills can also be used directly for pumping water for drinking purposes or minor irrigation. MNRE subsidy is available for installation of these systems.

The wind power programme of the Ministry is the fastest growing renewable energy programme. Indian wind power potential is 49,130 MW and the installed capacity of 13,065 MW as on December 2010. Wind power contributes to around 75% of the grid-connected renewable energy power installed capacity in the country. The major wind power capacity is in the states of Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Karnataka and Rajasthan. The wind energy market is continuing to grow steadily in India along with the rest of the world. India is all set to become one of the global manufacturing hubs for wind turbines with about 18 large wind turbine manufacturers, capacity ranging from 225 kW to 2100 kW and several small wind turbine manufacturers producing capacity ranging from 300 W to 50 kW. The main driving force for development of wind energy sector has been the programmes and provisions of Government of India (Major highlight: Accelerated Depreciation of 80%) which enabled large profit making companies, small investors and captive users to participate in the sector.

Ministry has also launched a scheme for Generation Based Incentives (GBI) through which more Independent Power Producers (IPPs) and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) are attracted towards the sector.  Indian wind power potential is 49,130 MW  and The Indian wind energy sector has an installed capacity of 14158.00 MW (as on March 31, 2011). In terms of wind power installed capacity, India is ranked 5th in the World. Today India is a major player in the global wind energy market.

 

 Wind Capacity Utilization Factors and Generation 

 

 

Wind Capacity Utilization Factors and Generation

 

Wind Power Density map from Indian Wind Atlas (2010)

 

 

 

Wind Power Density map

 

Wind Turbine Generators Technology Options and Development Trends

 

 

Comparison of Wind Turbine Generators



 

 

Courses in Wind Energy Technology

Indian Wind Industry faces serious deficit of skilled man power to meet the huge demand of this booming industry. Completely Indigenous and low-cost wind turbine design remains as challenge due to non-availability of human resource and research infrastructure. To assure timely evolution of wind industry and to meet India’s demands and development of rural areas, human resource development is a matter of immense interest. Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-WET), Chennai is continuously addressing these issues by organizing national & international training programmes since 2004 to produce quality human resource for windustry.   

Till now, about 600 national and 100 international participants were trained by C-WET through its ten national training courses including one special training course for professionals from Ministry & SNAs and Seven international training courses including one special training course for AOI engineers from Egypt. They have announced  the 10th National Training Course on “Wind Energy Technology” to address all aspects of Wind Resource Assessment, Wind Turbine Testing, Standards & Certification and Operation & Maintenance of Wind Electric Generators (WEGs) in a focused manner.

This short course offers a unique opportunity to learn about fundamentals of wind turbine technology and have been well received by the public and appreciated for wide coverage of interdisciplinary syllabus and quality of lectures. 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The objective of the training course is to transfer knowledge and needed special skills to the wind energy personnel active in technical and operational fields. The idea is to provide specialized training and knowledge to industry, utilities, technical institutions and various central and state governmental implementing agencies.

  1. Build personnel to meet the huge demand of skilled human resource in India, and specifically to do extensive research and evolve innovative strategies
  2. Disseminate knowledge and develop special skills using lectures from scientists and leading professionals in the wind energy sector, interactive sessions with the leading personnel in the Wind Energy field and learning materials.
  3. Provide an invaluable platform for exchange of professional and cultural experiences among diverse participants from all parts of the country.
  4. At the end of this course participants will have strong understanding on fundamentals of wind energy technology along with applications, standards, certification, economics, CDM and policies.
  5. Leverage on the research that continues to shape this rapidly evolving discipline.

 

THE PROGRAMME

The total course duration is three days from 25th to 27th May 2011 encompassing presentations, lectures with case studies, success stories and exercises. The training course timing will be from 09.00 am to 06.00 pm.

 METHODOLOGY & COURSE OUTLINE

The course content for the training is a carefully thought out syllabus with specific subject experts giving lectures and class room exercises. The course is designed to address all the aspects of wind power harnessing starting from wind resources assessment to project implementation and operations & maintenance in a focused manner. The three day course gives an overview covering the following multi-disciplinary topics:

  1. Wind energy conversion technology and power generation
  2. Assembly / design of wind turbine
  3. Wind turbine components and performance characteristics
  4. Control system engineering
  5. Wind turbine technology developments
  6. Feasibility study & technology assessment of wind farms
  7. Wind resources assessment and techniques
  8. Planning including design of wind farms
  9. Cost benefit analysis of wind energy projects
  10. Installation and commissioning of wind farms
  11. Post installation activities - grid integration
  12. O & M aspects of wind farms
  13. Testing of wind turbines
  14. Certification of wind turbines
  15. Small wind turbine and hybrid systems
  16. Indian government policies, schemes and legal frameworks
  17. Wind energy developments in India
  18. CDM related to wind energy development

 Seventh International Training Course on WIND TURBINE TECHNOLOGY AND APPLICATIONS for ITEC & SCAAP Countries 03rd to 26th August 2011

 This is a special training course for Indian Technical and Economic Co-operation (ITEC) and Special Commonwealth Assistance for Africa Programme (SCAAP) partner Countries organised by Centre for Wind Energy Technology, Chennai, India under the ITEC / SCAAP programme of Ministry of External Affairs (MEA), Government of India with the support of Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), Government of India.

 Interested candidate may apply through TC Division of Ministry of External Affairs @http://itec.mea.gov.in.

 Find your country eligibility to participate, from the list of countries in the link below,

 ITEC Countries

 SCAAP Countries

 Applications should be sent through the Embassy / High Commission of India at your respective countries. Details regarding Indian Embassy / High Commission in your country can be found at http://itec.mea.gov.in

http://www.cwet.tn.nic.in/html/international_seventh.html

Soon colleges in Tamilnadu will be offering courses in wind energy.  The centre, industry and educational institutions are working together to start specialized courses in wind energy in engineering colleges. Tamilnadu tops in wind energy generation. The need for qualified manpower in this sector has been felt by ministry of new and renewable energy.
The wind turbine manufacturers association [IWTMA]have also expressed this need.  IWTMA has submitted a draft syllabus to Amrita and PSG engineering college.
As more companies wish to set up windmills in Tamilnadu, the students will find good employment.  An offshoot of wind energy companies, is the need to find the right location to set up plant. Software companies like Windsim are reaping benefits. They too are interested in collaborating with educational institutions. 

http://www.eai.in/club/users/aathmika/blogs/302

 

Year wise capacity addition in Tamilnadu:

Year wise installed capacity addition (MW):

Up to Mar 2

877.00

2002-03

133.60

2003-04

371.20

2004-05

675.50

2005-06

857.60

2006-07

577.90

2007-08

380.70

2008-09

231.10

Total capacity

4304.50

 

Capacity of Wind energy sector:

As on 31.3.2006

Demonstration Projects (MW)

19.4

 

Private Sector Projects (MW)

2873.1

 

Total Capacity (MW)

2892.5

As on 31.3.2007

Demonstration Projects (MW)

19.355

 

Private Sector Projects (MW)

3440.1

 

Total Capacity (MW)

3459.4

Addition during 2006-2007

(MW)

565

Addition during 2007-2008

(MW)

391.90

Addition during 2008-2009

(MW) till 30.11.08

250.30

Total Capacity

(MW) till 30.3.11

4132.72

 

 

General details on Wind Power generation
http://www.mnre.gov.in/prog-wind.htm

  1. Demonstration Programme on Generation Based Incentives for Grid Interactive Wind Power Projects.
    http://www.mnre.gov.in/adm-approvals/wpp-gbi-gcwp.pdf
  2. Guidelines for Wind Measurement by Private Sector and subsequent development.
    http://www.mnre.gov.in/adm-approvals/wra-guidelines.pdf
  3.  
    1. General information on Small wind energy and Hybrid Systems
      http://www.mnre.gov.in/adm-approvals/wind-hybrid-system.htm
    2. Modified scheme for the programme on “Small Wind Energy and Hybrid Systems(SWES)” during 2010-11 and 2011- 12– reg.
      http://www.mnre.gov.in/adm-approvals/wind-hybrid-system.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of Domestic Wind Electric Generators (WEG) Suppliers:

 Suzlon Energy  Suzlon Energy is the biggest Wind Energy Company by far with 4-5 Gigawatts of WTG Capacity per year. Its subsidiaries Hansen Transmission and RePower are also big players in the Wind Energy in Europe.The Company has seen its revenues and profits take a huge hit in recent times but has been recovering slowly.

 

RRB Energy

The company has a long history and manufactures Wind Turbines at its plants in Tamil Nadu. The Company has a capacity of 300 MW which it is expanding to 700 MW.The Company makes only 2 models with power rating of 600 Kw and 1.8 MW.Merill Lynch has made a small investment in this company.

                   NEPC India

This company was one of the wind energy heavyweights and a stock market darling earlier. However It no longer remains an active player in the Indian market .Heavy Debt and Bad Management drove to this company to the ground despite being a pioneer in the Indian Wind Power Market.

 Auro Mira Energy

The company is more of a Green Utility rather than a full fledged WEG manufacturer. It has made plans to manufacture Wind Turbines in the future. It has attracted funds from Baring and IFC to push forward its Green Plans.

Regen Powertech

It is a small scale WTG Supplier like RRB Energy which recently set up a small 300 MW manufacturing facility in Tada,Andhra Pradesh recently. The company licenses technology from Vensys to manufacture 1.5 MW gearless Wind Turbines. The company has managed to supply both big and small wind farms over the last 2 years.The company is supported by the PE arm of Future Group.

 

 WinWind

The company is not exactly a domestic company rather one with a Finnish Origin.It is owned by the Abu Dhabi Masdar ,Siva Group and the government of Finland.It has recently established a 1000 MW capacity in Venga, Tamil Nadu and also has a 500 MW plant in Finland as well. The company plans to producer 3 MW Turbines at its Indian plant as well.

Pioneer Wincon

The company is a JV between the Pioneer Group and Wincon of Denmark.It makes small 250 KW Turbines and is a bit player with 30 years of operations in India.The Company remains a small static player in the Wind Energy Market of India.

 Chiranjeevi Wind Energy

 A Small bit player like Pioneer Wincon which engages mostly in the sale of small 250 KW Wind Turbines.Like Pioneer Wincon it has sold a number of these Turbines to small companies mainly in the Southern Part of India.

Lietnar Shriram Limited

The company is a 50:50 JV between the Shriram Group of India and Lietnar of Italy.The company makes gearless turbines of 1.5 MW capacity and has supplied to small farms in Maharashtra.The company has a major in-house customer in the form of Orient Green Power which is building a 300 MW farm in Tamil Nadu using Lietnar Shriram Wind Turbines.

 

 Kenersys

The company is part of the Baba Kalyani Group which is a major forgings manufacturer in India. It was bought over in 2007,when the Kalyani Group and PE firm First Reserve bought over the German company RSB Consult. The Company mainly makes 2 and 2.5 MW turbines and has production facilities both in India and Germany. It has wind design capabilities between 1-3.6 MW and with a powerful parent, it could become a success in the future. Amongst the newer wind energy companies like Lietnar,RRB Energy,Regen and WinWind,it looks like the one with most potential.
                                     Techno Electric& Engineering Company Ltd

 Tamilnadu  gets more power from the leading EPC company

Techno Electric & Engineering Company Ltd (TEECL), one of the leading EPC Company in the country, focused on power sector, today announced commencement of first phase of the 125 MW wind energy generation project. Simran Wind Project Pvt. Ltd., the 100% subsidiary of TEECL, embarked the project by commissioning 15 MW of wind energy generation on March 31, 2011 in the state of Tamil Nadu. The 125 MW project which is as per of schedule is set for completion by June 2011. The total cost for phase I of the project will be about Rs 700 crore with a debt-equity ratio of 1.8:1. The debt financing is being done by IFC Washington, Standard Chartered & DBS.

Foreign Wind Turbine Manufacturers in India

Besides the Domestic players,all the Major Global Wind Heavywieghts l have  Turbine Production Facilities in India such as Vestas,Enercon,Gamesa,Siemens,GE .

Offshore Wind Energy in India/Tamilnadu

Offshore wind power refers to the construction of Wind farms in bodies of water to generate electricity from wind. Better wind speeds are available offshore compared to on land, so offshore wind power’s contribution in terms of electricity supplied is higher.  An offshore wind power project is under discussion for Tamilnadu.

Deepak Gupta, secretary, ministry of new and renewable energy, had announced that a study is being undertaken with the help of Chennai-based Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-WET) to ascertain the feasibility of setting up wind farms in India’s offshore areas.

“We’re thinking of two pilot projects in Tamil Nadu and Gujarat states,” Deepak Gupta, secretary of the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, said in an interview on the sidelines of a wind conference in New Delhi.

The cost of offshore wind farms are typically 2-2.5 times the traditional wind farms and face challenges in terms of technology, implementation as well as environment. Suzlon has been pushing for offshore wind farms as its subsidiary REpower has a dominant position in the supply of offshore wind turbines But it looks like Tata  has the honour of setting up India’s first offshore wind energy plant off Gujarat. end November.

 Siemens has big plans to enter the highly competitive wind market in India and  they may focus more on the offshore wind market in India.

R Christodas Gandhi, principal secretary, TEDA, said 41 sites were located in Tamil Nadu for setting up wind farms for power generation, of which 26 sites are exhausted. “We are also now looking at possibilities for setting up wind farms in offshore and coast line.”

http://energybusiness.in/tamil-nadu-exploring-offshore-possibility-wind-farms/

http://www.eai.in/club/users/amsapna/blogs/1305

wind sites in Tamilnadu

Villages District Wind Power Density at 50 m (W/m2)
Kayattar Thoothukudi 356
Onamkulam Thoothukudi 292
Ottapidaram Thoothukudi 378
Andhiyur  Coimbatore 271
Arasampalayam Coimbatore 291
Edayarpalayam Coimbatore 398
Kethanur Coimbatore 376
Myvadi Coimbatore 376
Pongalur Coimbatore 309
Poolavadi Coimbatore 416
Poosaripatti Coimbatore 254
Sultanpet Coimbatore 206
Thannirpandal Coimbatore 317
Kamagiri Dharmapuri 212
Pushpathur Dindigul 201
Kanyakumari Kanyakumari 436
Kattadimalai Kanyakumari 458
Muppandal Kanyakumari 597
Muppandal Kanyakumari 410
Muttom  Kanyakumari 203
Sembagaramanpudur Kanyakumari 441
Andipatti Madurai 346
M.S.Puram Madurai 343
Meenakshipuram Madurai 334
Alagiyapandiyapuram Thoothukudi 442
Ayikudy Thoothukudi 448
Naduvakkurichi Thoothukudi 244
Nettur  Thoothukudi 419
Puliyamkulam Thoothukudi 343
Servallar Hills Thoothukudi 313
Talayathu Thoothukudi 422
Vakaikulam Thoothukudi 256
Mettukadai Erode 281
Rameswaram Ramanathpuram 426
Achankuttam Tirunelveli 397
Gangaikondan  Tirunelveli 338
Kalunir Kulam Tirunelveli 390
Kannankulam  Tirunelveli 375
Kumarapuram Tirunelveli 385
Mangalapuram Tirunelveli 423
Ovari Tirunelveli 221
Panakudi Tirunelveli 469
Sankaneri Tirunelveli 388

TN has currently about 5800 MW of wind turbines installed, by far the largest in the country.

Wind power Projects in TN:

Power Plant

City

Total Capacity (MWe)

Cape Comorim

Cape Comorim

33

Kayathar Subhash

Kayathar

30

Muppandal Wind

Muppandal

22

Gujdimangalam

Gujdimangalam

21

KPR Mills

Tirunelveli

19.27

Chennai Mohan

Chennai

15

Perungudi Newam

Newam

12

Amarijyoti Spinning Mills

Tirunelveli

11.27

Kethanur wind farm

Kethanur

11

Arupukottai Srijayavilas

Tirunelveli

7.5

Muppandal Madras

Muppandal

10

Poolavadi Chettinad

Poolavadi

10

UIC Udyog

Coimbatore

5

KPR Fertilizers

Tirunelveli

3

Kallam Agro Products

Tirunelveli

1.5

 

Most of these wind power projects  have a firm  PPA with TNEB and power generated will be exported to the southern grid.

http://wind-power.industry-focus.net/index.php/tamil-nadu-wind-power-projects.html

Indian Wind Turbine Policy

The tabular column below will give a comparative idea of the guidelines and incentives for wind power generation in various states.

Guidelines / Incentives for Wind Power Generation in Various Status

Andhara Pradesh

Wheeling

5 % of energy wheeled

Banking

Not allowed

Buy-Back

Rs. 3.50/perKWh w.e.f. 09.09.2008 (frozen for 10 years)

Third Part Sales

Allowed under Electricity Act 2003 subject to regulation framed by respective SERs

Capital Subside

Industrial Status

Other Incentives

Reactive Power: 10 paise perKVARh upto 10% & 25 paise per KVARh above 10%.

 

Tamil Nadu

Wheeling

5% of Energy

Banking

5% (12 months financial year April to March)

Buy-Back

Rs. 3.39/ per KWh (No Escalation)

Third Part Sales

Allowed under Electricity Act 2003 subject to regulation framed by respective SERs

Capital Subside

Nil

Other Incentives

Reactive Power: 25 paise perKVARh upto 10% & 50 paise per KVARh above 10%.

 

Karnataka

Wheeling

5% of Energy

Banking

Allowed @ 2% of energy Input

Buy-Back

Rs. 3.40/ per KWh without any escalation for 10 years of commercial operation

Third Part Sales

Allowed under Electricity Act 2003 subject to regulation framed by respective SERs

Capital Subside

No Electricity Duty or 5 Years

Other Incentives

Reactive Power: 40 paise per KVARh

 

Kerala

Wheeling

To be decided by SERC

Banking

To be decided by SERC

Buy-Back

Rs. 3.14/ KWh for 20 years

Third Part Sales

Allowed under Electricity Act 2003 subject to regulation framed by respective SERs

Capital Subside

 

Other Incentives

 

 

West Bengal

Wheeling

7.5% . of energy fed of grid

Banking

 

Buy-Back

Rs. 4/ KWh

Third Part Sales

Allowed under Electricity Act 2003 subject to regulation framed by respective SERs

Capital Subside

 

Other Incentives

Reactive Power: 20 paise per KVARh

 

Gujarat

Wheeling

4% of energy

Banking

Settlement to be done month to month & surplus energy at end of month & surplus energy at end of month shall be deemed as sold to Utility as per Tariff Rate.

Buy-Back

Rs. 3.50/KWh for 20 years

Third Part Sales

Allowed under Electricity Act 2003 subject to regulation framed by respective SERs

Capital Subside

Electricity duty exempted

Other Incentives

Reactive power < 10% energy wxempted, then 10 paise/ KVARh. Reactive Power > 10% of energy expoeted, then 20 paise/ KVARh

 

Madhya Pradesh

Wheeling

2% of Energy

Banking

Allowed, but proposal for this invited from DISCOM

Buy-Back

Ye Year wise rates (Rs./kWh) from 1st to 20th year 1styr- 4.03 2nd yr - 3.86 3rd yr- 3. 69 4th yr- 3.52 5th yr - To 20th yr - 3.36

Third Part Sales

Allowed under Electricity Act 2003 subject to regulation framed by respective SERs

Capital Subside

No Electricity Duty for 5 years

Other Incentives

Reactive Power: 27 paise for KVARh

 

Maharashtra

Wheeling

2% of Energy 5% as T&D Loss

Banking

12 Months

Buy-Back

Rs. 3.50/KWh (first year of commissioning) (Escalation of 15 paise per year for 13 years)

Third Part Sales

Allowed under Electricity Act 2003 subject to regulation framed by respective SERs

Capital Subside

Power evacuation arrangement,Approach Road,Electricity Duty, Loan to Cooperative Societies

Other Incentives

Reactive Power: 25 paise per KVARh

 

Rajasthan

Wheeling

50% of normal charge as applicable for 33 KV, in addition to the transmission charges of 3.6% 8 surcharge

Banking

Six Months (Apr. to Sept. 8 Oct. to March. Utilization of banking energy not permitted in Dec. to Feb.)

Buy-Back

Rs. 4.2S/ KWh for Jaisalmer, Barmer 8 Jodhpur. Rs. 4.50/KWh for all other districts

Third Part Sales

Allowed under Electricity Act 2003 subject to regulation framed by respective SERs

Capital Subside

Exemption from Electricity Duty @50% for 7 years

Other Incentives

Reactive Power 5.75 paise per KVArh with escalation of 0.25 paise per year

The potential is far from exhausted. Indian Wind Energy Association has estimated that with the current level of technology, the ‘on-shore’ potential for utilization of wind energy for electricity generation is of the order of 65,000 MW. The unexploited resource availability has the potential to sustain the growth of wind energy sector in India in the years to come.InWEA will help the industry in realizing this

 Evacuation of Wind Energy a Major Issue

 Generating wind power is the first step, evacuation from these windmills through grid connectivity is just as vital.

 As most of the wind farms are in remote villages, some even without electric power, evacuation of power has become a major issue.  As I mentioned earlier  1000 MW of wind power has been installed in TN in 2010, much has remained idle as they are not evacuated owing to the lack of 230 KV and 400 KV sub-stations...

To sort out this problem a Japanese firm has come forward to  fund  the Tamil Nadu Electricity Board's (TNEB) Rs 4,000 crore project to improve wind  energy evacuation in the state.

http://www.eai.in/club/users/Romila/blogs/tags/renewable_energy_indiawind_energy_Tamilnadu

Will Global Warming affect the density of wind world over?

We see large wind farms being set up in Tamilnadu as I mentioned the Western Ghats play a crucial role in trapping wind currents; hence regions in the shadow of the ghats- tirunelveli, Coimbatore have become ideal spots for setting wind farms.

The question is will global warming change wind patterns.

Reading the blog below my fears was allayed; Tamilnadu can continue to invest heavily in wind farms without going cropper.

I was pleasantly surprised when i read that " The production of wind energy in the U.S. over the next 30-50 years will be largely unaffected by upward changes in global temperature, say a pair of Indiana University Bloomington scientists who analyzed output from several regional climate models to assess future wind patterns in America's lower 48 states. "

If it is true for USA it must be true for wind projections in TN and wind projections in Gujarat or for that matter the whole of India.

http://www.eai.in/club/users/amsapna/blogs/1268

 

Wind Energy Apex Bodies in Tamilnadu:

 

Indian Wind Turbine Manufactuers Association:

Suite# A2 OPG Towers, 74(Old No.133),
Santhome High Road, Chennai 600 004.
Tel. (044)24620227

http://www.indianwindpower.com/

 

Centre for Wind Energy Technology:

Velachery-Tambaram High Road,
Pallikaranai, Chennai - 601302
Tel : 91-44-22463982-84’

http://www.cwet.tn.nic.in/

 

 

 

Tamilnadu Wind Energy current news 


Solar Wind Hybrid Systems

Tamilnadu State has a very good potential forinstalling solar wind hybrid systems. 

TEDA, Tamilnadu Energy Development Authority,conducted large scale awareness workshops withcolleges resulting in receipt of applications to thetune of 3.1 MW for sanction of Central FinancialAssistance from MNRE. 

This is a record numberagainst less than 1 MW worth of applicationsreceived by MNRE from rest of India !!

That speaks volumes about the huge potential for solar wind hybrid in tamilnadu. 

Just like in Wind energy production, Tamilnadu can lead India in Solar wind hybrid energy production too.



WIND ENERGY


Wind based power generation involves theconversion of wind energy to electrical energythrough the use of wind turbine generators(WTG). The WTG aids to convert mechanicalenergy into electrical energy.

Wind energy is one of the cleanestrenewable sources of power. 

The Potential areathat are suitable for establishment of windgenerators in Tamil Nadu are mostly confined to
the southern (Aralvoimozhi pass and Shengottaipass) and south western (Palghat & Cumbumpass) parts of the state.Wind is the primary reason for Tamil Nadu’sleadership in renewable energy. Wind constitutesover 88% of total renewable energy installedcapacity in the state.The total wind based power productioncapacity in the country is 16179 MW (as of31.01.2012). 

(This figure is before the latest estimate by MIT researchers who have estimated the potential in India for wind energy to be 
between 2000 to 3000 GW.)



Of this 6696 MW is installed inTamil Nadu making it the clear leader in the windenergy sector in India accounting for about 41%of the total installed capacity in the country.

 

 

 

 

 

Publication for Sale

 

 

Information, Training and Commercial Services

 

 

Wind Resource Assessment

 
  • Indian Wind Atlas Map, Timeseries Data, Micro Survey Report, Wind Energy Resource Survey in India

     

    http://www.cwet.tn.nic.in/html/departments_publicationforsale.html

     

    Wind component manufacturers , wind component traders

     

    Ajai Agengy

    Ascott Electricals

    Ashoka Gears

    AE- Automatic Electric Ltd

    Agrawal Electronics

    A.K. Electronics

    A.Bill Engineers

    Advance Technical

    Amit Traders

    Asian Wind Turbines (P) Ltd

    Aswani Engineering Company

    Ajit Electronics Co.

    Asiatic Electrical & Switchgears Ltd

    ACE Automation Engineers

     

    Autokast Ltd.

     

    Atharve Engineers (India) Pvt Ltd.

    Ashok Leyland- Wind Energy

    Appllo Electrical Services

    Avant-Garde Engineers & Consultants (P) Ltd

     

    Ahir Electric Trading Co.

     

    Asian Cables & Industries Ltd

    Axis Electrical Components (I) Pvt.Ltd

    AALAM TEX

    ABB Limited

    Allen-Bradley India Ltd.

    ABG Shipyard Ltd.

    Altec Fabricators

    Anand Engineering Industries

    Advanced Technikal Services

    AVN Hydraulik India Pvt. Ltd.

    A.S. Engineering

    APT Controls

    A.K.Electronics

    Allied Electronics

    AAA Elecronics Sales

     

    Amar Polymers

     

     

    A to Z Bearing Corporation

    Arihant Bearing Center

     

    BIL Power Ltd

    Bombay Chemical Equipments

     

    Bill Engineers

     

    Balaji Traders

    BCH Electric Limited

    Balaji Engineers

    Bharat Electrical & Electronic Equipments

    Bentex Electricals

    Batliboi enXco Pvt. Ltd.

    Brevini India Pvt. Ltd.

    BS & B Safety Systems (I) Ltd

    Bharat Forge

    B.I. Enterprises

    Bhilai Engineering Corporation Ltd

     

    Bhopal Engineering Corpn.

    Braco Electricals Pvt.Ltd

     

     

    Birla 3M Ltd.

    Compaq International

    Carbone Lorraine India Pvt. Ltd

    Continental Transport Organisation Pvt. Ltd.

     

     

    Creative Transformers Pvt. Ltd

     CLP Power India Pvt Ltd

    Control & Switchgear Co. Ltd

    CLP Cind Farm (India) Pvt Ltd

    Cotton City Electronics

    Crest Capacitors

    Cresta Instruments

    Care Technocraft

    CO-EFF Friction Bands Pvt. Ltd

    Classic Polymers & Resins

    Coral Rewinding Industrie

     

     

    Capcab India Ltd.

    Cape Electric Corporation

    Consolidated Energy Consultants

     

    CCI Cables Ltd

    Crompton Greaves Limited

     

    Divine Wind Kraft

    Divine Wind Technik

    Dynatech Engineers

    Datar Switchgear Ltd

     

    Delton Cables Ltd

    Diamond Cable Ltd.

    Dodia Electricals

    Elcolite Industries

    Energe Capacitors Pvt. Ltd

    Epcos India Pvt. Limited

    Easun Reyrolle Relays & Device Ltd

    Esennar Transformers

    Emmess Control Pvt. Ltd

    English Electric Company of India Ltd

    Emco Limited

    Electronic Components & Trading Co.

    Elektronika

    Ekta Engineering Corporation

    Empee Engineering Pvt. Ltd.

    Everest Electricals & Engg. Services

     

    Electric Controls Company

    Emerson Electric Co. (Leroy-Somer

    Electrolites (Power) Pvt.Ltd.

    Elektrolites Power Pvt Ltd

    Fronttline Electricals

    FAG Precision Bearings Ltd

    Flender Limited

    Fluidmech Equipment

     

     

    Finolex Cables Ltd

    Fort Gloster

     

     

    Gassco Corporation

    G.E.Power Controls India Pvt. Ltd

    Green (India) Corporation

    Garrad Hassan India Pvt Ltd

    Green Infra Ltd

    GEC Alsthom

     

    Green India Corporation

    GasscoCorporation

    Global Electronics

    Guru Nanak Electronics

    Ghatge Patil Industris Ltd.

    Gosend Enterprises

    Greenweiz Projects Ltd

    Global blade technology

     

    Gandhi & Associates

     

    Goliya Instruments Pvt. Ltd.

    Genus Overseas Electronics Ltd

    General Power Company Pvt. Ltd

    Hagemeyer India Ltd.

    Harman Engineers Pvt. Ltd

    HPL India Ltd.

    Hi Damp Industrial Mountings Ltd

    Hila Industries

    Hindustan Composites Ltd.

    Hi Damp Industrial Mountings

    Hitech Components & Pressings

    Hi-Tech Transducers & Devices

    Henel Engineers Pvt. Ltd

    Hitech Components

    Hitech Wind Solutions

    Hindustan Power Products (P) Ltd

     

     

    Havells India Ltd

    Hindustan Vidyut Products Ltd

    Incab Industries Ltd

    Interface Electronics Ltd

    Integro Engineers Pvt.Ltd

    Instrument Transformers

    Indo Wind Energy Ltd

    Innovative Technologies

     

    Indo Asian Fusegear Ltd.

    Inka Engineers

    India WindPower Ltd

    Intercon Systems Pvt. Ltd.

     

    Industrial Cables (India) Ltd.

    Ishwardas & Sons.

    INOXWind Ltd

    J. Subuswami Aiyar & Sons

    Jyoti Ltd

     

    JSL Industries Ltd.

     

    Jayachandra Traders

    J. Sutaria & Co.

     

    Jayashree Electrodevices Pvt. Ltd

     

    Jaishree Enterprises

    J. Singh Trading Corporation

    Koushik Power Systems (ACSR Conductor)

    Krip-Sure (Emjay & Company)

    Krishna Commercial Corporation

    Kappa Electricals

    Kama Engineering Corporation

    Kapsales Electricals Ltd

    K.Dhandapani & Co. Ltd

    Kintech Synergy (P) Ltd

    Kamla Electricals & Engineering Co.

     

    Kenersys

     

    Lotus Engineering Industries

    Larsen & Toubro Ltd

    Lac Systems Pvt. Ltd

    . Lucas TVS Ltd

    Leitner Shiram Mfg. Ltd

    L.S. Engineering Services

    Lac System Pvt. Ltd

    Lars Enviro Pvt. Ltd

    Lakshmi Electrical Control Systems Ltd

    Lakshmi Machine Tools Ltd.

    Lawrence & Mayo (India) Private Ltd

     

    Lapp India Pvt. Ltd.

    Mark India

    Megger

    Mesuka Engineering Company P. Ltd.

     

    Mass-Tech Controls Pvt. Ltd.

    Megatech Control Ltd.

    Madhav Capacitors Pvt. Ltd

    MALDE Capacitors Mfg. Co.

    MAMAL Capacitors Pvt. Ltd

    Momaya Capacitors

    Modern Instruments (P) Ltd.

    Macroma Commercial Corporation

    Mesuka Engineering Company Pvt. Ltd.

    Motwane Manufaturing Co. P.Ltd.

     

    Multi Pressings

     

    Mac Electronics

     

    N.C. Cable Industries (P) Ltd.

    Narmada Trading agency

    Nasik Insulations

    Niki Cable Industry

    Nicco Corpn. Ltd

    Neo Techniques

    Neo Electronics

     

    Neela Enterprises

     

    ORIENT GREEN POWER

    Oswal Cables Pvt Ltd

     

     

     

    .

     

    MDS Switchgear Ltd.

     

     

     

    Rishabh Instruments Pvt. Ltd.

     

     

     

     

     

    Tibrewala Electronics Ltd

    WPI International (I) Pvt. Ltd.

    Dubas Engineering Pvt.Ltd.

     

    Nu-Tech Industrial Spares & Services (P) Ltd

    MAP World Wide Service

     

    Texonic Instruments

    Vishwatara Electronics

     

     

    Daunil Samcon Co.

    Hind Rectifiers Ltd

    Kab Viel Associates

     

    Emco Precima Engineering

    Jayashree Electron Pvt. Ltd.

    Crown Electronics

     

    Gold Stone Tele Sevices

     

     

    Khatau Junker Ltd

    Magne Win Magnetics

    Rotek Electronix

    Theta Control

     

    Barkar Seals

    HEMLOC Corporation

    Utkrushtha Vastu Waanijya

    Wintech Engineers

     

     

    Central Power Research Institute

    HAWE Hydraulics Pvt. Ltd.

    Hydraulic Equipments Services (HAAS)

    Masu India Control (HAWE Dealer)

    Welbond Products

    Delux Rubber Industries

     

    Raj Bearing

    Durga Bearings Pvt. Ltd.

     

    Gancoss (India) Company

    Indo Asia Enterprise

    Modern Agency

    M.P. Brothers

    M.R. Bearing Company

    NBC Bearing

    Quality Mill Stores

    Raj Deep Industrial Products Ltd

    R B C Bearings Pvt. Ltd

     

    Company

    ZKL Bearings (India) Pvt. Ltd.

    Enercon (India) Limited

     

    Kateel Engineering Industry (P) Ltd

    Rathi Turboflex Pvt.Ltd. (Dealer of Twiflex)

    Arrkay Power Transmission

    s

     

    (Premium Energy Transmission Ltd.)

     

    Jagat Engineering Works

    Rane Brake Linings

     

     

     

     

    National Engineering Company

    Unimod Systems

    Protos Engineering Co. Pvt.Ltd (Transfluid Dealer)

     

     

    Devi Engineering Works

     

    Elecon Engineering Company Ltd

    Kirloskar Pneumatic Co. Ltd

    .

    Winergy Drive Systems India Pvt. Ltd.

     

     

    Pravi Auto Swing Pvt. Ltd

     

    Mechano Engg. Co.

     

     

     

     

     

    Velumurugan Heavy Engg Industries Pvt. Ltd.

    Parag Fans & Cooling Systems Ltd

    Rollon Hydraulics Pvt. Ltd

    Maco Corporation (India) Ltd

    Barakath Engg. Industries Pvt. Ltd

    .

     

    R.M.H.Fabrications Pvt Ltd

    Power Drives Enterprises (I) Pvt. Ltd

    Electromec Equipments

     

     

    Wadia Electronic Enterprises

     

    AIMIL Ltd.

     

    Nippon Intruments India Pvt.Ltd

    Winn Tek Power Systems Pvt. Ltd

    Auroville Wind Systems

    .

    M.P.Windfarms Limited

     

     

    Gold Stone Tele services Ltd.

    .

     

     

     

    Pal Mohan Electronics Pvt. Ltd.

     

    Prem Engineering

     

    Perfect Sales Corporation

    Premier Poly Film

    PLA Components

    Paramount Conductors Ltd.

    Premier Electrical Services

    Protos Engineering Co. Pvt.Ltd

     

    Polycab Wires Pvt. Ltd.

    Phoenix Contact India Ltd

    Pankaj Electronics

    Premier Controls

    Pioneer Jellice India Pvt Ltd

     

    Predict Technologies India Pvt. Ltd

    Pyramid Fabricators & Engineers

    Precision Transmatic Devices P. Ltd

    Powerzen Technologies

    Parag Fans

     

    Premier (India) Bearings Ltd

     

    Phoenix Trading Corporation

    Perfect Bearing Co.

     

    Pioneer Wincon

     

    Power Tech Tradings

     

     

     

     

    Ramesh Iron work Pvt.Ltd

    RPG Cables Ltd

    Ram Sarup Industries Ltd

    Rameez Engineering Construction Corporation

    Royal Engineering Works

     

    . Rockwell Automation

    Rectifiers & Electronics

    Rittal India Pvt. Ltd

    R.K.Trading Co.

    Rolliflex-Industry

    R.S.Windtech Engineers (P) Ltd

    Ramakrishna Electrical Winding Works

    Re-union Engg. Co. Ltd.

    Ramawat Construction Company

    Regen Power

    Rectifier House (India) Pvt. Ltd.

    Reicoill Powers Ltd

     

    Ravin Cables Ltd

     

    S.G.Control

    Shri Laxmi Mining Corporation

    Sri Sanari Electrical & Engg. Works

    SKF Bearings (I) Ltd

    Shreejee Adhesives & Sealends

    Schneider Electric India Pvt. Ltd

    Sacs Engineering

    Selmore

     

    Simplex Engg. & Foundry Works Ltd

    Southern Alloy Foundaries Ltd.

     

     

    Sethia Syndicate

     

    Suzlon Energy Ltd

    Sai Electricals

    Sastha Engineers & Consultants

    Shivalic Power Control Pvt Ltd

    Siemens Ltd

    Sai Elecricals

    ST-Mag

    Shiva Texyarn Ltd

    Sri Satya Sai Constructions

    Shree Ratan Ind. Corporation

    Shree Nirman Udyog

    Shyam Cables Industries

    Skytone Electricals (India) Ltd.

    Southern Electric Coporation

    Siemens Ltd- Renewable Energy Division

    Sri Ganesh Wind Power Engrs. Pvt.Ltd.

    SANA Engineering Company

    Sri Ganesh Wind Power Engineers Pvt. Ltd.

    Star Energy Systems

    Semikron Electronics Pvt. Ltd

    Sree Vasudeva Agencies

    Stromag India Pvt. Ltd.(Sime Brakes)

    S.V. Hightech Bearings India Ltd

    Sales Service Company

    Shree Bearing

    SKF Bearings India Ltd

    Southern Aerodynes Pvt. Ltd

    Sidharth Heavy Equipments Ltd

    Srujana Fabricators & Engineers Pvt. Ltd

    Suvarna Fibrotech Pvt. Ltd.

    Shree Nath Automation

    Shrenik Industries

    SPM Instrument India Pvt. Ltd.

    Sri Amman Services

    Shah Wind Inc.

    Subhash Projects & Marketing Ltd.

    Sri Durga Structurals

    Sakthi Drives

    Shanthi Gears Ltd

    Saif Electronics Ltd

    S.M. Technology

     

    Somani Brothers

    Southern Bearing Enterprises

    Star Bearing Centre

    Star Bearing Company

     

    Satyam Industries

    Secure Meters Ltd

    )

     

    Sushil Cables Pvt. Ltd

    Technical System

    Torrent Power Ltd

    The Tata Power Company Ltd

    Telemecanique & Controls (India) Ltd

    The Coimbatore Millstores & General Supplies Co.

    The New Ahmedabad Ball Bearing Co.

    Timken India Limited

    TTL Technology Pvt. Ltd

    Teknic Controls

    Teknik Euchner Electronics Pvt. Ltd

    Transformers and Ractifires (India) Ltd

    Trio Transformer

     

    MSPL Ltd

     

    Utility Powertech Ltd.

    Universal Engineering Service

     

    Uniflex Cables Ltd. (Unicab)

    United Engineers & Co.

    Universal Construction Machinaries

    Universal Cables Ltd

    Ushadev Power Holdings

    UCIL Synchem Pvt. Ltd.

    Universal Electric Engg. Works

     

    Pioneer Wind con

    VBINE Energy

    Vee Vee Controls Pvt. Ltd

    Venus Engineering Services

    Vulkan Technologies Pvt. Ltd

     

    Vijai Steel Corporation

    Vivin & Company

    Venoos Electricals

    Vikas Agencies

    Voltamp Controls (India) Pvt. Ltd

    Victory Windfarm Services Pvt. Ltd

    Victory Windfarm Services Pvt. Ltd.

    Vinit Enterprise

     

     

    Vestas

    Wind IPP Vitaa Zeus Energy Pvt. Ltd.

     

    Wienergy Drive Systems India (P) Ltd.

    Wind Pro Contacts

    Weizmann Ltd

    Winwind Power Energy Private Limited

    Winn Tek Power Systems Pvt. Ltd.

    WinDForce Management Services

    Wescare (India) Ltd.

    Windcare India Pvt. Ltd.

    Windston Springs Pvt. Ltd

     

    Yeses Infrastructure Pvt. Ltd

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

 

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12 Comments

  • anna
    anna -

    Everyone wants to become Aathmika, is it !:-)

    Like

  • shankar
    shankar -

    Looks great Amsapna. My knowledge in wind is not much.Keep it up. 
    Each of us are Aathmika's in our  areas of expertise.  Like

  • Rahul
    Rahul -

    India stands 5th in wind energy production. wind energy contributes 70% of the renewable energy in our country.
       Wind turbines play a significant part in the wind energy; the model determines the output.
       JNNSM is promoting solar , perhaps we should  have some plans for wind too.
    Suzlon is the big daddy of wind in india;other manufacturers are soon trying to catch up .
    Global Wind Turbine Leaders like Siemens,Enercon,GE have started Wind Turbine Equipment Manufacturing in India in recent times to lower their costs.
       A list of  turbine manufacturers in India can be seen at this site.
    http://www.greenworldinvestor.com/2011/04/08/wind-turbines-in-india-list-of-typessizescapacity-of-turbines-from-wind-turbine-manufacturers/ Like

  • aathmika
    aathmika -

    Repowering revolution is a great opportunity. I am surprised that the potential is just 1400 MW.

    I want to know the viability. Wha tis the cost of Repowering ? What will be the additional energy generation ? When does one breakeven ? 

    Can someone give the figures ?
    Like

  • Nithya
    Nithya -

    TN alone has the highest potential for offshore ! TEDA tells MNRE !


    .. trying to educate Ministry of New and Renewable Energy on off-shore facilities as the "highest potential for offshore was expected to be only in Tamil Nadu. "We recently explained to the Secretary of MNRE (about the offshore facilities in Tamil Nadu)... he had assured that they will pursue about it..", Jain said.

    Some related news
    Tamil Nadu exploring offshore wind farms

    The Tamil Nadu Energy Development Agency (TEDA) said, it was estimated that around 5,000 mega watt (Mw) of power can be generated through wind energy in Tamil Nadu. Of this, 4,889 Mw has already achieved in March. The agency also said wind-based power generation will be enhanced further and next focus will be on solar.

    R Christodas Gandhi, principal secretary, TEDA, said 41 sites were located in Tamil Nadu for setting up wind farms for power generation, of which 26 sites are exhausted. “We are also now looking at possibilities for setting up wind farms in offshore and coast line.”

    “For the next five years Tamil Nadu is likely to add 500 Mw of wind power every year. Apart from this, the state has the potential to generate power from waste.Salem and Namakkal alone can produce 150 Mw of power by using waste, the state government had not tapped the opportunity so far,” said Deepak Gupta, secretary, ministry of new and renewable energy (MNRE).

    Gandhi added, solar energy also offers exciting opportunities in the state. “The only factor is cost, unless it comes down below Rs 10 crore (for setting up a one Mw solar power plant) investors will keep shying away from solar energy. This can be done through innovation and indigenous technology source

    Like

  • Nithya
    Nithya -

    Offshore potential in TN


    http://ibnlive.in.com/generalnewsfeed/news/on-the-setting-up-offshore-windpower-facilities-jain/923852.html Like

  • aathmika
    aathmika -


    Re introduction of Accelerated Depreciation ie AD and Generation Based Incentive ie GBI for wind energy in India is likely !!


    The renewable energy ministry is planning to re-introduce incentives for the wind energy sector to allay fears that capacity addition could fall after the sops were withdrawn from April 1. 

    The government rolled back two key incentives for the sector this year: accelerated depreciation and generation-based incentive. Industry players say the withdrawal of these sops will keep power producers at bay and could reduce annual capacity addition to less than 1,000 mw in 2012-13, against the target of 3,000 mw. 

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/news-by-industry/energy/power/government-may-re-introduce-sops-for-wind-farms/articleshow/12873801.cms


    Like

  • krupali
    krupali -

    Gamesa will build a 2 billion-rupee ($37 million) plant in southern Chennai to produce its new 2-megawatt machines 

    Gamesa to Add India Wind-Turbine Plant as China Loses Appeal

    Gamesa Corp. Tecnologica SA (GAM)Europe’s second-biggest wind-turbine maker, will open a third factory in India as manufacturing costs fall below those in the larger market of China.

    Gamesa will build a 2 billion-rupee ($37 million) plant in southern Chennai to produce its new 2-megawatt machines, Ramesh Kymal, head of the Spanish company’s Indian unit, said today in Mumbai. The site will get 70 percent of its supplies locally by year-end, driving down output costs by 18 percent, he said.

    Competition among turbine makers in China has grown amid a supply glut, putting pressure on prices as manufacturers seek to contain costs. India has now become the wind industry’s largest growth market by volume after China tightened project approvals and Europe and the U.S. reined in financing amid burgeoning debt, the Global Wind Energy Council said last month.

    Gamesa got 20 percent of its sales in India last year and expects that share to climb, targeting 711 megawatts in sales by the end of December, according to Kymal. Recent orders include a 150-megawatt contract from Mytrah Energy Ltd. (MYT), part of a 2011 accord to buy 2,000 megawatts of machines from Gamesa by 2016.

    “We’re sold out for the year and have booked orders to September of next year,” Kymal said. An 18 percent reduction in output costs is “even more efficient than in China,” where the the selling price remains lower because of cheaper financing and other expenses, he said.

    Gamesa, whose largest competitor is Denmark’s Vestas Wind Systems A/S, already produces turbine blades and towers at two plants in India. Its new factory will have an annual capacity of 1,500 megawatts and export turbines to markets including North Africa and Sri Lanka, as well as supplying local developers, Kymal said.  

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-05-03/gamesa-plans-new-wind-turbine-factory-in-india-s-chennai.html Like

  • amsapna
    amsapna -

    Wind power generation in Tamil Nadu touches 3,000 megawatts

    With wind power generation on the upswing, 30 per cent of Tamil Nadu's requirement of 10,000 megawatts (MW) is being met, leading to uninterrupted power supply across the State for the last one week, K Kasturirangan, Chairman, Indian Wind Power Association has said.

    Since April 28, power generation gradually increased from 1,000 MW to reach a peak of 3,000 MW on Saturday in the major wind energy generating areas of the state, including the Coimbatore region, he told PTI.

    So far there have been no complaints about load shedding or power-cuts, he said.

    The grid received 1,100 MW on Monday last, 1,300 MW on Tuesday, 1,500 MW on Wednesday, 2,000 MW on Thursday and 2,500 MW on Friday. Though official figures are yet to be available, 3,000 MW was generated and used on Saturday, which was the maximum during last year, Mr Kasturirangan said. http://www.ndtv.com/article/south/wind-power-generation-in-tamil-nadu-touches-3-000-megawatts-206934



    C-Wet starts new wind assessment project


    Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-Wet), an autonomous R&D institution under the renewable energy ministry, has launched another phase of its wind assessment project. This phase of the project will measure the potential of wind energy at a height of 100 meters in 75 locations and at 120 meters height in 4 locations.

    "The technology of megawatt class wind turbine has been changing all over the world. Anticipating taller towers with larger diameter rotors in the Indian market, we have now extended our assessment at greater heights in different areas to harness the potential of wind energy with the latest technology in India," said Dr

    This phase will also look for land availability through Geographical Information System along with a 'land-use land-cover' map, indicating the type of land cover which provides easy access to the wind power producers. It will also mark suitable land areas that are available for wind farming, using geographical instruments and applications like 'Google maps'.

    Currently, the project operates in 7 states -- Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh, while there's a separate project for Odisha.

    This project would calculate the potential of only on-shore wind sites. For offshore, however, there is one project in Tamil Nadu near Rameshwaram, measuring the wind energy potential at 100-meter height.

    http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2012-05-11/news/31669216_1_wind-power-producers-wind-turbine-wind-sites


    Tamil Nadu government offers interest-free loan to promote wind power units

    Seeking to attract more private players in wind power generation, Tamil Nadu Government today said it would provide interest-free loans for five years to new entrants.

    "The government is keen on more private companies producing electricity from wind power... We are ready to provide interest-free loan for five years to those who want to set up wind power units," Electricity MinisterNatham R Viswanathan told the Assembly.

    http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2012-05-02/news/31538601_1_wind-power-interest-free-loan-tamil-nadu






    Wind Energy Potential in India Revisited at different hub heights



    The Centre for Wind Energy Technology (CWET), located in the capital of India’s leading wind-energy-producing state, is all set to launch a new project to assess the wind energy potential in the country. The new project would enable new and existing project developers to get a real sense of the investment opportunities available in India’s most favored renewable energy sector.


    Officials at CWET plan to set up wind-speed assessment sensors at 75 locations at a height of 100 meters and at four other locations at a height of 120 meters. The development is significant because the organization has actual validated wind energy potential measurements taken at only 45 meters. The data is so old that probably none of the wind energy solution providers in India are selling any wind turbine with a hub height of 45 meters.
    Most of the wind turbines available in India have hub heights ranging between 65 and 100 meters. Interestingly, according to the measurements at 45 meters high, the southern state of Tamil Nadu has a wind power generation capacity of 5,374 MW while the wind generation capacity installed in the state was 6,286 MW in August 2011. At 45 meters, India’s total wind power generation potential has been assessed at 49,130 MW, while at height of 80 meters the potential has been estimated at 102,788 MW.


    The decision by CWET to undertake a study which matches the current technology would boost the confidence of investors and project developers who were disappointed by the government’s move to roll back a tax incentive policy for wind projects from April 2012.


    Wind energy is the largest renewable energy sector in India with a share of 70 percent of the total renewable capacity installed. The sector continues to attract huge investment from domestic as well as international investors.


    Last year, the Global Wind Energy Council stated that, even in the absence of any new policies, the wind energy capacity is likely to double to about 24 GW by 2020 and further increase to more than 30.5 GW by 2030. If the current policies are fully implemented, the installed capacity is likely to grow by almost four times to over 46 GW by 2020 and then more than double to over 108 GW within the next ten years.


    Source: Clean Technica (http://s.tt/1bzr0)



    Wind Energy

    The wind installed capacity of the state is 6548  as on 31.10.2011. This is 47% of the country’s total wind installed capacity.

    Tamil Nadu is endowed with three prominent passes having high wind potential, due to the tunneling effect during south West Monsoon.

    Sl.No

    Name of the Pass/Districts

    Annual average Wind Speed (Km/hour)

    1     

    Palghat Pass, Coimbatore, Erode

    18-22

    2

    Shencottah Pass, Tirunelveli, Tuticorin

    18-22

    3

    Aralvoimozhi Pass, Kanyakumari

    19-25

    4Kambam Pass , Dindigul district19-25

    Kambam Pass in Dindigul District has been identified as wind potential area in the recent past.






    General details on Wind Power generation
    http://www.mnre.gov.in/prog-wind.htm

    1. Demonstration Programme on Generation Based Incentives for Grid Interactive Wind Power Projects.
      http://www.mnre.gov.in/adm-approvals/wpp-gbi-gcwp.pdf
    2. Guidelines for Wind Measurement by Private Sector and subsequent development.
      http://www.mnre.gov.in/adm-approvals/wra-guidelines.pdf
    3.  
      1. General information on Small wind energy and Hybrid Systems
        http://www.mnre.gov.in/adm-approvals/wind-hybrid-system.htm
      2. Modified scheme for the programme on “Small Wind Energy and Hybrid Systems(SWES)” during 2010-11 and 2011- 12– reg.
        http://www.mnre.gov.in/adm-approvals/wind-hybrid-system.pdf











  • Wind Energy and Evacuation:

    2012 -13


    • Considering the clean & renewable nature of 
    wind energy, Tamil Nadu has been in the forefront in harnessing it to the maximum extent. 
    The installed capacity of Wind power has grown 
    considerably from 857 MW in 2001 to 6696 MW 
    in 2011-12. There is also further scope for 
    adding 10,800 MW by various promoters. For 
    the year 2011-12, TANGEDCO had targeted 45 
    a capacity addition of 1000 MW, and achieved 
    1083 MW.


    • At present, the wind energy generation to the 
    state is predominantly from Udumalpet, Theni, 
    Tirunelveli and Kanyakumari area. The power 
    generated by these wind mills are being 
    evacuated using the nearby existing substations 
    of TANTRANSCO/TANGEDCO.


    • The wind power is highly variable in nature. The 
    unpredictable and infirm nature of wind energy 
    poses a great challenge for the grid 
    management. There are also other constraints 
    such as availability of transmission 
    infrastructure to evacuate the entire power 
    generated by the wind energy promoters.


    • Capacity addition of around 5000MW at the rate 
    of about 1000MW per year is expected through 
    the newly proposed Private Wind Electric 
    Generators (WEGs) in Tirunelveli, Theni and 
    Udumalpet area in the next 5 years. In this 46 
    regard MNRE was approached for seeking fund 
    assistance under National Clean Energy Fund 
    under Two phases. Phase-I transmission system 
    is already planned and recommended by CEA 
    for Rs. 2752.397 Crores. and Phase-II 
    transmission system is under planning stage.


    • In order to evacuate the power from the wind 
    generators, a separate corridor with the 400KV 
    substations at Thappagundu (New SS) - 
    Anaikadavu(New SS) and Rasipalayam (New 
    SS) along with the associated 400 KV lines of 
    336 Ckt Km length mode are also proposed. 
    These substations will be connected to the 
    proposed 765 KV substations being executed by 
    PGCIL at Salem.






    WIND ENERGY

     


    1.1 WIND ELECTRIC GENERATORS: 
    A Wind Electric Generator is a mini power plant which generates 
    electricity from wind energy. It consists of a 30 M high tall steel tower with 
    the wind turbine mounted on top. The wind turbine has 3 main components.



    (i) rotor blades (ii) gear box and (iii) generator. The wind 
    force striking on the blades is initially converted into mechanical energy and 
    this mechanical energy operates the Wind Electric Generator to produce AC. 
    electricity. The Wind Electric Generator has no battery bank and the power 
    produced is directly fed into the grid of Electricity Board. The entire operation 
    of power generation is controlled automatically by means of electronic control 
    system mounted at the bottom of the tower.

     

    Special features: 
    (i) Wind Electric Generators can be installed only at specific locations 
    with adequate wind potential as notified by the Government based on 
    studies. The list of locations are given in Annexure-I. 
    (ii) Available in various capacity ranges from 225 KW to 750 KW (now 
    upto 2.0 MW). 
    (iii) Tower height can be in the range of 30M to 50 M to tap wind energy 
    more effectively. 
    (iv) Wind Electric Generator of 250 KW can generate 4 lakhs to 6 lakhs 
    units of electricity per annum depending upon the wind potential of 
    the area.

     

     

    Cost of Wind mill: 
    The cost of a single 225 KW or 250 KW which is widely preferred is 
    about Rs.1 Crore. The total project cost of a one MW wind farm will be about 
    Rs.5 Crores including charges payable to TNEB.

     

    Incentives / facilities offered by Government of India.

     

    (i) Accelerated depreciation on Wind Electric Generator is permissible 
    upto 80% of the cost for Income Tax calculations subject to minimum 
    utilisation for six months in the year in which the deduction is 
    claimed. 
    (ii) Import of Wind Electric Generators is permitted under Open Genral 
    Licence. 
    (iii) Customs duty concessions are available for the import of Wind Electric 
    Generators and certain essential spares. 
    (iv) Tax holiday granted for ten years in respect of profits and gains from 
    the investments in Wind Electric Generators.

     

     


    Incentives / facilities offered by Government of Tamil Nadu


    (i) TNEB buys surplus energy at the rate of Rs.2.75 per unit from the 
    existing wind mills commissioned before 15.5.2006 from the date of 
    renegotiation of the existing agreement and Rs.2.90 per unit from the 
    Wind Mills Commissioned after 15.5.2006 as per the new tariff order 
    issued by the Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission.

    (ii) Concessional wheeling charge is levied at 5% for captive use of 
    power under which industries can draw the power produced anywhere 
    in the state at the point of consumption.

    (iii) Banking facilities within the same financial year are allowed subject to 
    5% charges.

    (iv) Providing wind data and power potential at potential sites based on 
    the study conducted by TEDA, details of which are given in 
    Annexure I & II.

     


    Who can set up wind farm?


    ™ Power utilities like State Electricity Boards and Private power generation 
    companies, industries, industrial investors etc can install wind farms. 
    ™ Profit making industries can install wind farm to produce power for their 
    captive consumption as well as to avail income tax benefits for the 
    investment in such renewable energy projects. 
    ™ Profit making companies like financial institutions coming under 
    non-industrial categories can also set up wind farms to sell the power to 
    Tamil Nadu Electricity Board as well as to avail the income tax benefits.


    How to set up of wind farm?

     

    (i) Prospective investors may consult Tamil Nadu Energy Development 
    Agency (TEDA) or Tamil Nadu Electricity Board (TNEB) or other 
    Consultancy Agencies and plan for early Wind Energy Generation. 
    (ii) Select suitable land in a wind potential area and purchase the same 
    based on the wind potential. 
    (iii) Apply for consent letter for wind power generation with the following 
    details to the TNEB directly or through TEDA.

     


    a) Topo sketch of the land marking the proposed location of Wind 
    Electric Generator (taking into consideration of the nearby WEG 
    area i.e. leave reasonable space from the border area for your 
    neighbor). 
    b) Village Map. 
    c) Ownership records for the land.


    (iv) Apply for tie up arrangement with TNEB grid and execute the 
    interfacing work as per TNEB norms. 11% charges towards 
    supervision of the interfacing line works has to be paid to TNEB 
    before taking up the interfacing work. 
    (v) Arrange for erection of Wind Electric Generators from approved 
    manufacturers 
    (vi) Remit the prescribed development charges towards infrastructural 
    facilities for evacuation of wind power to TNEB. 
    (vii) Arrange for inspection by Chief Electrical Inspector to Government 
    and obtain Safety Certificate simultaneously from the Chief Electrical 
    Inspector of Government of Tamil Nadu. 
    (viii) Commission the Wind Electric Generator and get it tied up with the 
    Board’s grid. 
    (ix) Arrange to commission the Wind Electric Generator before 
    30
    th 
    September 31
    st 
    or March to avail depreciation allowance and 
    other tax benefits. 
    (The list of manufacturers of WEGs is given in Annexure-III)

     

    1.2 WIND MILL WATER PUMPS

     

    A windmill for water pumping consists of 12 M high steel structure 
    with 12 to 18 blades mounted on the top and with pumping device. The 
    wind force striking at the blades is converted into mechanical energy and 
    this energy is used to operate a pumping rod, as in the case of a hand 
    pump, to pump out water from open or bore well.

     

    Special Features: 
    (i) The windmill can be installed in any well which has no obstruction in 
    the form of tall trees or building around the site. 
    (ii) It can operate in places where the wind speed is about 18 kmph. 
    Gear type wind mills are available which can operate at a speed of 
    9 kmph. 
    (iii) The height of structure can be increased at the time of erection based 
    on site requirements. 
    (iv) There are only a few moving parts which if maintained properly will 
    render long service. 

    Main types of windmills and structure


    Gear type AV 55 Type 
    Tower : 30’ height Tower : 13.5 to 19.5 metre height 
    10’ Dia 18 blades 5.5 M dia 24 blades 
    Pump : 2” to 4” Pump : 3” to 5” 
    Wind Speed : 9 KM / hr Wind speed : 18 KM / hr 
    Water output : 1000 liters / hour Water output : 4000 liters / hour 
    Depth : 20 metres Depth : 15 metres 
    Approx. cost : Rs.82,000/- Rs.1,45,000/- 
    GOI Subsidy: Rs.30,000/- each 
    available for all users 
    Rs.45,000/- each 
    Note: The cost and subsidy are indicative and are subject to change without notice.


    1.3 SMALL AERO GENERATOR / HYBRID SYSTEM Aero generator is a stand-alone type generator which uses wind 
    energy for producing electricity, which is stored in a battery set for use of the 
    power conveniently for feeding small loads upto 30 KW. In the case of 
    hybrid systems, the generator will be run using both wind and solar energy so 
    that the availability of power is increased during the day and at night.


    Cost Rs.2.5 lakhs / KW (approx) 
    Subsidy from Government of India. 
    Community applications Direct use 
    by Central and State Government 
    75% of Exworks cost subject to a 
    maximum of Rs.2 lakhs / KW. 
    Individuals, Industrial Users, R&D 
    and Academic institutions 
    50% of Ex works cost subject to a 
    maximum of Rs.1.25 lakhs / KW.

     


    Procedure involved in setting up a windmill / Small Aero generator

     

     

    The applicant has to hand over the application given in Annexure-V duly 
    filled in and signed to TEDA along with Demand Draft for Rs.5000/- in favour 
    of TEDA towards Caution Deposit. The list of approved manufacturers by MNRE 
    is furnished in Annexure-IV. The applicant may choose one of the 
    manufacturers and indicate the name of the manufacturer in the application.

    On receipt of the application, the manufacturer will inspect the site and 
    give suitability report to TEDA. Based on the suitability report, TEDA will 
    forward the application to MNRE, GOI for the sanction of subsidy. 
    On receipt of 
    sanction order, the applicant will be informed of the allotment of windmill with a 
    request to place supply order on the manufacturer. Simultaneously the 
    manufacturer will also be directed by Tamil Nadu Energy Development Agency 
    to install and commission the windmill at the applicant’s site.

    On payment of 
    balance cost of windmill to the supplier by the applicant, the manufacturer will 
    install and commission the wind mill at the beneficiary site. Then the TEDA 
    Engineer will inspect the working of the windmill and on satisfactory functioning 
    of the windmill, TEDA will release Government of India subsidy directly to the 
    supplier.

    Like

  • aathmika
    aathmika -



    Surandai
    Valliyoor
    Devarkula
    Kayathar
    Theni 
    Kethanur   
    Site locations in Tamilnadu source  http://www.rrbenergy.com/site-location.asp Like

  • amsapna
    amsapna -

    Guidelines on the technical requirement to be fulfilled by a small windturbine manufacturer for empanelment with MNRE/C-WETThe small wind turbine manufacturers who wish to be empanelled with MNRE/C-WETmust submit the following documents to C-WET:I. In the case of 'Provisional empanelment' for manufacturers without avalid type test report from accredited laboratory*:• Registration certificate showing legal identity of the company;• Adequate manufacturing facility and quality system adhering to ISO 9001requirements / proof of having applied for ISO• Detailed technical specification of the turbine.• Product manual covering details of installation, maintenance, routineinspection and personnel safety.• Minimum simplified design document as per the format provided by R&D unit.• Electrical circuit diagrams.• Number of installations and its performance, as per the format provided byR&D unit.• Name plate prominently indicting wind turbine manufacturer and country,model and serial no., revision no., production date, maximum voltage andcurrent at turbine terminals, frequency for turbine connected to the grid.• Enter into an agreement for type testing with C-WET as per the IECstipulations with the above details.II. In the case of 'Empanelment' for manufacturers with a valid type testreport from accredited laboratory*• Registration certificate showing legal identity of the company;• Adequate manufacturing facility and quality system adhering to ISO 9001requirements.• Detailed technical specification of the turbine.• Product manual covering details of installation, maintenance, routineinspection and personnel safety.• Type test reports for power performance measurement, safety & functiontests and duration test.* Any laboratory with accreditation as per ISO/IEC 17025 requirements or any otherlaboratory on merit recommended by the Committee for empanelment of small windturbines and issuing type test reports as per the requirements of IEC standards .Suchlaboratories should also be in a state to support C-WET by providing the detailed reportsas and when required Like

  • Nithya
    Nithya -

    There are about 13400 MW of project applicationspending with TNEB. The main reason for delay in approvals seems to be the inadequacy of the existinginfrastructure to evacuate the proposed power. Prolonged delays in project approvals is one of thebiggest impediments to accelerated wind deployment. Urgent and effective actions are needed to grantexpress approvals to pending projects.
    An area of concern isthe condition of evacuation infrastructure. Load flow studies of 2011/12 conditions indicate that a largenumber of 100 kV and 220 kV lines get loaded beyond their thermal limit during the high-wind season.While the long-term solution is to create new grid infrastructure and connect large wind capacities at 400kV level, short-term measures like replacing standard conductors with HTLS conductors and changingsingle circuit lines to double circuit lines may help immensely.

    payment delay towind farm owners, majority of whom have not been paid for last one year of generation. This nonpaymentis severely affecting the capabilities of IPP players, some of whom have no alternative sources ofincome to even meet their debt obligation. This has curtailed IPP investments in Tamil Nadu. To buildinvestor confidence and push development, immediate measures are needed to pay the pending balanceover a committed time limit.
    TNEB’s insistence of 5D × 7Dcriteria is perplexing. As a way forward, TNEB has to relax this criterion and give the liberty to the winddevelopers to freely site their turbines based on standard optimization process.

    Repowering, if adopted, can be a win-win formulafor all. While it will mean monetary benefits to the investors, it will also mean better land utilization andhigh-quality generation, as the new machines would have more grid-friendly features than the oldmachines do. TNEB should initiate necessary measures for supporting repowering on a large scale.
    Offshore represents a very good opportunity for the state primarilybecause a large-capacity cluster would not affect land, would have more predictable generation andwould not be as distributed as onshore wind, making it easier to manage issues of the transmissioncorridor.

    Solar CSP potential, although estimated at 78505 MW using the NRELdataset, is not recommended for immediate private development. There are considerable differences inDNI data between various modeled datasets, with other (SolarGIS) dataset indicating no CSP potential inTamil Nadu. As DNI is derived data, the assumptions that go between the measurements and the derivedvalue impact the end results. In the absence of any validation of one dataset over another, any decisionon CSP potential cannot be done unless validated by field experience. Considering this, it will be advisablefor the government to install small pilot plants through its own funds and understand the resource andthe generation profile before asking the private investors to scale it up. A small-scale set of two 5 MWprojects, one with storage and one without storage, can be planned in Thottukudi and Tirrupur.
    Off-grids: The development of off-grid solar in Tamil Nadu requiresthree major interventions: enactment of state-based incentive or disincentive mechanisms, fast subsidydisbursal and awareness creation. In the past, the state initiated diktat on water harvesting worked reallyeffectively. A similar strategy for commercially available and proven applications like solar water heating,LED lights, solar street lights, etc. can help. For costlier technologies like rooftop solar PV and solar waterpumping, a suitable incentive mechanism aimed at households, institutions and commercialestablishments will help in accelerated deployment. It is leant that the slow pace of subsidy disbursal anddiscriminatory standards for subsidy eligibility are two main reasons for diversion of investments fromoff-grids. Awareness generation is another aspect that can substantially help in this regard. A majority ofpotential end users, especially in solar process heating, are not aware of the technologies, theiradvantages and subsidies. Like

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