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Those who have been following the textile industry will be aware of the closure of over 750 dyeing units in Tirupur owing to pollutants being discharged in their waste water. The Madras high court had ordered the closure of 752 dyeing units along Noyyal river some months back, based on an apex court ruling on a petition filed by farmers’ association Noyyal River Ayacutadar Protection Association ( NRAPA)).

Out of these 752 units, as per the pollution control board (PCB) records, 502 units were connected to 20 CETPS in Tirupur and the remaining 152 units had Individual Effluent Treatment Plants (IETP). They were still asked to close down because of the PCB  stipulation that it had to be zero discharge.

In a significant move towards resolving the Tirupur crisis, it has been recently decided that one of the two advanced methods – Brine solution method or the nano-technology treatment of effluents – will be adopted to ensure zero-liquid discharge of toxic effluents into the Noyyal river. This would, hopefully, pave the way for the reopening of the dyeing units after five months.

An expert delegation will be sent to Bharuch district in Gujarat to study and analyse the nano-technology treatment of effluents adopted by some of the dyeing units there.

The Pollution Control Board (PCB) of Tirupur has already given the nod for a three-month trial run of Arulpuram CETP using the brine water solution method where the Reverse Osmosis (RO) reject from the treatment plant is channelled back through special pipelines and reused again to ensure zero-liquid discharge.

I am not able to find specific details on the brine method or for that matter the nanotech method. Let’s hope these are indeed sustainable methods.